English in journalism

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from SLGDEV. Show SLGDEV's posts

    English in journalism

    I would think that people who write for a newspaper, or at least the proofreaders, would be able to use proper grammar.  Here is an example from today's piece by Zuri Berry:


    "And with those kind of expectations set upon him"


    The word is "that", not "those", because it modifies "kind" which is singular.  Proper English would have been either:


    "And with that kind of expectations set upon him"


    or


    "And with those expectations set upon him"


    or 


    "And with those kinds of expectations set upon him"


    SLGDEV/sheldong/sheldonlg

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: English in journalism

     

    Do they even bother to hire proofreaders anymore?

     

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from ATJ. Show ATJ's posts

    Re: English in journalism

    My pet peeves with both print and broadcast media include:

    *the incessant use of less when fewer is correct

    *the unrelenting assault on the actual meaning of 'beg the question'

    There's more but why aggravate myself further on a beautiful spring day?

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from DanishPastry. Show DanishPastry's posts

    Re: English in journalism

    My personal beef is when the writer cannot use I/me correctly. As in "He gave a report to Peter and I". No, he gave it to Peter and me.

     

    Supra societatem nemo

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: English in journalism

     

     Between you and I, this whole thread just begs the question whether we all need to spend less hours discussing these kind of things and just get back to football! 

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from SLGDEV. Show SLGDEV's posts

    Re: English in journalism

    In response to DanishPastry's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    My personal beef is when the writer cannot use I/me correctly. As in "He gave a report to Peter and I". No, he gave it to Peter and me.

    [/QUOTE]

    That one gets me as well.  Also "me an him".

    I am a programmer, but during the early stages of the 2001 depression (2003 through 2006), I wound up having to teach high school math for a few years.   I was required to take some courses in order to maintain the temporary license I was granted.  I was amazed by the total lack of understanding of proper English usage by several individuals in the classes -- and these were the people that would be teaching our children!

    Here is another one, albeit on a more sophisticated level -- "the data is".  The word "data" is plural so it should be "the data are".

    SLGDEV/sheldong/sheldonlg

     

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from provpats. Show provpats's posts

    Re: English in journalism

    They might as well go to bleacher report

     
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  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from SLGDEV. Show SLGDEV's posts

    Re: English in journalism

    In response to DougIrwin's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Have you seen Mt Hurl's grammar here?  It's embarrassing. He's a teacher, so he claims.

    [/QUOTE]

    He is not a journalist with a wide circulation.  They should be setting a good example.  That was the point of my starting this thread.  If Mr. Hurl is a teacher with poor grammar, that is very unfortunate as well.

    SLGDEV/sheldong/sheldonlg

     

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from mellymel3. Show mellymel3's posts

    Re: English in journalism

    Man oh man is it ever time for real football camp to begin!

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Fletcherbrook. Show Fletcherbrook's posts

    Re: English in journalism

    Good lord I have an ice cream headache now.

     
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  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from CatfishHunter. Show CatfishHunter's posts

    Re: English in journalism

    Journalism died circa 1995 when the interwebs took off.   Your (sic) expecting way too much.  Lower your standards.  It will never return.

     
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  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from SLGDEV. Show SLGDEV's posts

    Re: English in journalism

    In response to CatfishHunter's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Journalism died circa 1995 when the interwebs took off.   Your (sic) expecting way too much.  Lower your standards.  It will never return.

    [/QUOTE]

    Nice joke.  [Your (sic) rather than you're]. I get it. 

    SLGDEV/sheldong/sheldonlg

     

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: English in journalism

     

     Slow day when the grammar discussion is more interesting than the football talk.

     

    Personally, I'm okay treating "data" as a collective noun.  Yes, I know in Latin it's the plural for datum, but really as an English word it's mostly used in a collective sense, which means treating it as a singular noun is  natural.  Most publishers now accept it as a singular noun.  When we talk about data and number is important, we tend to use the phrase "data point" or "data points," while the Latin singular of data (datum) is almost never used in ordinary discourse.

     

    I won't call anyone out, but the phrase I read here that really offends my grammatical sensibilities is "would of."  When I'm feeling particularly magnanimous I guess I can regard it as a quaint and charming New Englanderism, but really do we not know that "would of" is just bad pronounciation of the conditional verb phrase "would have" and that the phrase "would of" makes as much sense as "would in" or "would at" or any other combination of the auxiliary verb  "would" and a preposition?

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: English in journalism

    In response to DougIrwin's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to SLGDEV's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to DougIrwin's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Have you seen Mt Hurl's grammar here?  It's embarrassing. He's a teacher, so he claims.

    [/QUOTE]

    He is not a journalist with a wide circulation.  They should be setting a good example.  That was the point of my starting this thread.  If Mr. Hurl is a teacher with poor grammar, that is very unfortunate as well.

    SLGDEV/sheldong/sheldonlg

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Well, at least Mt Hurl teaches Home Ec and doesn't teach English.  That we can all be thankful for.  

    [/QUOTE]

    Do I have to remind you that a preposition is a word you should never end a sentence with? 

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from CatfishHunter. Show CatfishHunter's posts

    Re: English in journalism

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

     Slow day when the grammar discussion is more interesting than the football talk.

     

    Personally, I'm okay treating "data" as a collective noun.  Yes, I know in Latin it's the plural for datum, but really as an English word it's mostly used in a collective sense, which means treating it as a singular noun is  natural.  Most publishers now accept it as a singular noun.  When we talk about data and number is important, we tend to use the phrase "data point" or "data points," while the Latin singular of data (datum) is almost never used in ordinary discourse.

     

    I won't call anyone out, but the phrase I read here that really offends my grammatical sensibilities is "would of."  When I'm feeling particularly magnanimous I guess I can regard it as a quaint and charming New Englanderism, but really do we not know that "would of" is just bad pronounciation of the conditional verb phrase "would have" and that the phrase "would of" makes as much sense as "would in" or "would at" or any other combination of the auxiliary verb  "would" and a preposition?

    [/QUOTE]

    I attribute this phenomenon to the gradual change in society.   Many people neither read nor write the written word in proper form any longer.   If you don't see it written correctly you may well rely on the sound of the phrase when needing to compose a thought.   "Would of" sounds a lot like "would have".

    Texting is another contributing factor to the decline of proper language usage.

    I realize that a lot of people on the board will find this minutiae insignificant, but as you say, it's a looong way to next season.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from CatfishHunter. Show CatfishHunter's posts

    Re: English in journalism

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to DougIrwin's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to SLGDEV's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to DougIrwin's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Have you seen Mt Hurl's grammar here?  It's embarrassing. He's a teacher, so he claims.

    [/QUOTE]

    He is not a journalist with a wide circulation.  They should be setting a good example.  That was the point of my starting this thread.  If Mr. Hurl is a teacher with poor grammar, that is very unfortunate as well.

    SLGDEV/sheldong/sheldonlg

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Well, at least Mt Hurl teaches Home Ec and doesn't teach English.  That we can all be thankful for.  

    [/QUOTE]

    Do I have to remind you that a preposition is a word you should never end a sentence with? 

    [/QUOTE]


    Nicely done above.

     
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  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from CatfishHunter. Show CatfishHunter's posts

    Re: English in journalism

    In response to DougIrwin's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to CatfishHunter's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to DougIrwin's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to SLGDEV's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to DougIrwin's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Have you seen Mt Hurl's grammar here?  It's embarrassing. He's a teacher, so he claims.

    [/QUOTE]

    He is not a journalist with a wide circulation.  They should be setting a good example.  That was the point of my starting this thread.  If Mr. Hurl is a teacher with poor grammar, that is very unfortunate as well.

    SLGDEV/sheldong/sheldonlg

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Well, at least Mt Hurl teaches Home Ec and doesn't teach English.  That we can all be thankful for.  

    [/QUOTE]

    Do I have to remind you that a preposition is a word you should never end a sentence with? 

    [/QUOTE]


    Nicely done above.

    [/QUOTE]

    Nicely done?  LOL

    I saw it and didn't feel like adding another word.  I am not getting paid to print things here so I truly don't care if I start or end a sentence with a preposition.

    We have people here who don't know basic words, their uses, conjunctions, possessive, plurals, etc.

    You and your fellow Brady Ball Washer ain't got nothing. 

    Not how I just used "ain't" for effect. LMAO

    [/QUOTE]


    Relax.

    Prolate made a joke by correcting your error with one of his own (intentionally).   Mine did the same, though not as well. 

    Alas, both were clearly lost on you.

     
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