ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsGnome. Show PatsGnome's posts

    ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    Amazing what hippocrates most of the media is.  

    When Riley Cooper made his 'racist' remark, every media outlet covered the story.  

    Now Hugh Douglas does a similar thing to Stephen Smith of ESPN.  Not a sound by

    ESPN and most media outlets.

    http://www.nypost.com/p/news/national/blitzed_ex_jet_in_race_rant_m5Yl50bYR5QgQwRUHDCsIL/

     

    Very Disappointing

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Not-A-Shot. Show Not-A-Shot's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    HERE IS THE LINK

    (The link above doesn't work.)

    I wonder what the backlash will be.  If the Cooper incident didn't happen last week, this would be under the rug quickly.  I think the timing is going to elevate the chatter, however.

     

     

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Muzwell. Show Muzwell's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    Wait what's the big deal, I thought it was OK for black guys to talk that way?

     
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  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from TFB12. Show TFB12's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

    Wait what's the big deal, I thought it was OK for black guys to talk that way?




    Exactly!  It's okay for black people to use words like that to each other, no big deal. 

    Hey, every race want's to be treated equally yet when it comes to things like this it's okay to not be equal. I get it..... not!

     

     

     

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from nyjetssuc. Show nyjetssuc's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    ESPN employing a double standard? I DON"T BELIEVE IT!!!!!!!!!!! IMPOSSIBLEEEE!!!!! NEVER HAPPEN!!!!!!!!!!

     

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    Hey, another outraged white guys thread . . . 

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsEng. Show PatsEng's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

    Hey, another outraged white guys thread . . . 




    Way to assume everyone is white in here Pro. What about other black people, hispanic, or asian that hate the double standard especially in the manner that he used it. He didn't use it as a term of endearment as commie suggested, read the article, he clearly used it as a racist slur against another black man. It's black on black racism. If you were outraged when Cooper said it you should equally be outraged how it was used here as it was clearly used in the derogartory manner

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

     

     So other than Commie, who isn't white?

     

    And a black person calling another black person a "house n . . ." isn't racist, but it's a damn strong insult . . . 

     

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7kf7fujM4ag

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsEng. Show PatsEng's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

     

     So other than Commie, who isn't white?

     

    And a black person calling another black person a "house n . . ." isn't racist, but it's a damn strong insult . . . 



    Who knows but you just assumed everyone was based solely that no one likes the double standard which is what is helping to maintain this seperation and resentment of the races.


    How is that not racist? Calling them a "Uncle Tom" and "house n*" is most certainly racist. Just because they are both the same color doesn't mean you can't be racist towards each other. Kind of like a german calling an irish man "mick" is racist. The best examples came in the civil war in which northern free blacks clearly admitted racism towards their southern slave brothers and treated them differently from northern black people. Similar context clearly used to the seperation of the two and slurs used against one another to treat one different based upon the circumstances and origins.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    Anybody who doesn't get the difference between a white person calling a black person a "n . . ." and a black person doing it, doesn't understand a damn thing about racism (and is almost certainly white).

     

     

     

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsEng. Show PatsEng's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

    Anybody who doesn't get the difference between a white person calling a black person a "n . . ." and a black person doing it, doesn't understand a damn thing about racism (and is almost certainly white). 




    There is a difference between a term of endearment and a derogatory use. I joke around with my friends calling them mick all the time becuase we are irish but we wouldn't want english man calling us micks because that's a racial slur towards us nor would we want another irshman using it towards us in a derogatory manner (if you didn't know the irish are kind of split). BTW I grew up in a predominate black neighborhood so I most certainly know about racist because I faced it everyday against me, that is unless you don't think "cracker" is racist

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

     

    Yeah, and my mom used to affectionately call us "w*ps" but that's different than someone who is not Italian calling me a "w*p."  The "n" word is more offensive, though, than mick or w*p because of the more extreme discrimination Blacks faced for centuries here.  We Irish and Italians faced some discrimination, but for relatively short periods, and without nearly the consequences of the discrimination blacks faced (and, to some degree, continue to face). 

     

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to russgriswold's comment:

     

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

     

     

     

    Anybody who doesn't get the difference between a white person calling a black person a "n . . ." and a black person doing it, doesn't understand a damn thing about racism (and is almost certainly white).

     

     

     

     

     



    You do realize when a black person calls another that word it's to mock the white man using towards the black man, right?

     

     

    My question is, if it's such a dergatory term, why even utter the word to begin with?  It's like a Jewish person using the "k" word towards another. You'd never see that happen because it's deemed offensive and deragatory.

    What is their to gain by saying the word? 

    It's just a shame that people apparently have that kind of language built up in their heads that it's apparently part of their everyday vocabulary.

    I don't know. I would never lower myself in that way to begin with, so maybe I am just looking at this all wrong.

     

     



    Using he word "affectionately" is kind of a way to take control of something long used against you.  But calling someone a "house n" is a different thing altogether.  It's an insult.  Not affectionate. Not racist. But a pretty strong condemnation.  It's kind of like a harsher way of calling someone a "sell out" or a "s*ck up."

     

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from Not-A-Shot. Show Not-A-Shot's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    A black guy says it to another black guy:  He dislikes that black guy.

    A white guy says it to or in reference to a black guy:  He hates all black guys.

    There's the difference in a nutshell.  While it may not be true 100% of the time, that's sort of the idea.  No, it's not okay for a white guy to use that term...ever.  Black guys shouldn't either, but it's a heck of a lot more acceptable.

    As for the right and wrong of things:  Life's not fair.  Trying to make it fair is a waste of time.  Trying to explain why you think it's not fair is an even bigger waste of time. 

    No, there shouldn't be WET because there is BET.  The rest of the channels are WET.

    No, there shouldn't be the WAACP because there is the NAACP.  The rest of the AACPs are for the Ws.

    There is a double standard when it comes to reporting violence, but that's known and you know what?  That's how it goes.  There will never be a media spotlight on black on white violence nearly as much as the one on white on black violence.  Know why?  It's not newsworthy and it won't induce change, so no one cares.

     

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsEng. Show PatsEng's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

     

    Yeah, and my mom used to affectionately call us "w*ps" but that's different than someone who is not Italian calling me a "w*p."  The "n" word is more offensive, though, than mick or w*p because of the more extreme discrimination Blacks faced for centuries here.  We Irish and Italians faced some discrimination, but for relatively short periods, and without nearly the consequences of the discrimination blacks faced (and, to some degree, continue to face). 

     



    You do realize that mick comes from the english after they enslaved the irish for 600 years and treated them just as bad as blacks in America but for only half the amount of time right? Or did you not know that the irish were slaves to the english for 600 years? Did you not know that they had different set of laws for the irish who were used as farming surfs for their english nobles and that irish were routinely killed, abused, and tortured by the english during that time period including using them as front line piece during war to prevent english deaths which included firing arrows into lines of irishman in order to kill the enemy at the same time. Or how about the potato famine which caused the immigration to the US in which irishman were routinely discriminated against and killed millions of irishman only really happened because the english "procured" 1/3 of the remaining edible crops to feed the english army around the world. With that extra food millions of irish would have survived. But yeah no other race knows nothing of the pain of discrimination or slavery.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from TFB12. Show TFB12's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    I think it is funny and extremely foolish of LeSean McCoy to say he can't respect teammate Riley Cooper because of this yet LeSean McCoy went to twitter and tweeted these vile comments to his baby mama..

     

    McCoy said the mother of his child was a "Broke bum" and a "nobody" who was trying to make her name off their son and told his followers to "Tell @Angelface0330 to get a job n stop begging for child support money she a BUM needs me to LIVE sad!!!"

    He also said "I hit u n a week without knowing ya name .. My son the only reason u have a life u broke stop frontn on IG ...U BUM."

    I think it is probably safe to say that not many people respect the dirt bag LeSean McCoy!

     

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  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Muzwell. Show Muzwell's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    The word IS derogatory, and shouldn't be uttered by anybody. To say otherwise is to endorse a double standard. Context doesn't matter. 

    Just the fact that we're analyzing whether this guy said it to that guy and it's OK because they're both black or it isn't OK because one of the guys is lighter skinned, or he uses proper English when he speaks and the other guy is darker and he's from the hood....pretzel logic or what?

    Robbery is wrong, but if I rob from a bank it's not as bad as if I steal a woman's purse, right? 

    Use of the word is classless and wrong no matter who uses it and no matter the context. That's a fact and not a debatable point. Otherwise, it's a double standard. So if you think it's OK depending on "context," then you have to be OK with double standards.

     
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  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

     

    Context does matter.  You can say fire all you want in most situations, but yell it in a crowded theater and it's something else.  Language is like this.  Context is everything. 

     

    Let's not be willfully stupid.  

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to PatsEng's comment:

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    Yeah, and my mom used to affectionately call us "w*ps" but that's different than someone who is not Italian calling me a "w*p."  The "n" word is more offensive, though, than mick or w*p because of the more extreme discrimination Blacks faced for centuries here.  We Irish and Italians faced some discrimination, but for relatively short periods, and without nearly the consequences of the discrimination blacks faced (and, to some degree, continue to face). 

     

     



    You do realize that mick comes from the english after they enslaved the irish for 600 years and treated them just as bad as blacks in America but for only half the amount of time right? Or did you not know that the irish were slaves to the english for 600 years? Did you not know that they had different set of laws for the irish who were used as farming surfs for their english nobles and that irish were routinely killed, abused, and tortured by the english during that time period including using them as front line piece during war to prevent english deaths which included firing arrows into lines of irishman in order to kill the enemy at the same time. Or how about the potato famine which caused the immigration to the US in which irishman were routinely discriminated against and killed millions of irishman only really happened because the english "procured" 1/3 of the remaining edible crops to feed the english army around the world. With that extra food millions of irish would have survived. But yeah no other race knows nothing of the pain of discrimination or slavery.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Did they have separate washrooms for Irish people in the US in 1960? The "n" word and other derogatory words for blacks that were accepted as "normal" by the majority were part of a systematic and pervasive system of discrimination that held blacks in an inferior status for centuries, that continued until at least the 1960s, and that continues to have residual negative effects in the black community in the US. 

    Yeah, everyone knows the English treated the Irish very badly.  But that's not recent American history.  And, please, don't pull this "the Irish are victims" thing in an American context.  There were Irish mayors in major American cities before most blacks could vote in the South or get decent jobs anywhere, North or South.  

     

     

     

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to russgriswold's comment:

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    Yeah, and my mom used to affectionately call us "w*ps" but that's different than someone who is not Italian calling me a "w*p."  The "n" word is more offensive, though, than mick or w*p because of the more extreme discrimination Blacks faced for centuries here.  We Irish and Italians faced some discrimination, but for relatively short periods, and without nearly the consequences of the discrimination blacks faced (and, to some degree, continue to face). 

     

     




     

    But, if the words are deragtory in nature and derived from the same vein, what is the difference?

    Also, I don't see how duration of oppression makes a difference.  If someone called me a "limey" or something, not sure I'd care but it might be offensive or deragotory to some.

    I just don't see the point in this day and age to pretend like there should be differen rules and different applications.

    It's one thing if you're with your friends in private or whatever, but the Riley Coopers or Hugh Douglas's sound like low class, ignorant tools, IMO.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Rusty, you're a smart guy.  You know that context makes all the difference.  It means something very different when I call my wife "sweetie" and if I were to call my secretary "sweetie." Same word, different contexts. 

     

     

     

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    The word IS derogatory, and shouldn't be uttered by anybody. To say otherwise is to endorse a double standard. Context doesn't matter. 

    Just the fact that we're analyzing whether this guy said it to that guy and it's OK because they're both black or it isn't OK because one of the guys is lighter skinned, or he uses proper English when he speaks and the other guy is darker and he's from the hood....pretzel logic or what?

    Robbery is wrong, but if I rob from a bank it's not as bad as if I steal a woman's purse, right? 

    Use of the word is classless and wrong no matter who uses it and no matter the context. That's a fact and not a debatable point. Otherwise, it's a double standard. So if you think it's OK depending on "context," then you have to be OK with double standards.

     



    Yes, life is complex.  Things aren't nearly as simplistic as you portray them.  Context does matter with language, a lot.  Every linguist will tell you that . . .   

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from DanishPastry. Show DanishPastry's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    The word IS derogatory, and shouldn't be uttered by anybody. To say otherwise is to endorse a double standard. Context doesn't matter. 

    Just the fact that we're analyzing whether this guy said it to that guy and it's OK because they're both black or it isn't OK because one of the guys is lighter skinned, or he uses proper English when he speaks and the other guy is darker and he's from the hood....pretzel logic or what?

    Robbery is wrong, but if I rob from a bank it's not as bad as if I steal a woman's purse, right? 

    Use of the word is classless and wrong no matter who uses it and no matter the context. That's a fact and not a debatable point. Otherwise, it's a double standard. So if you think it's OK depending on "context," then you have to be OK with double standards.

     



    Yes, life is complex.  Things aren't quite as simplistic as you portray them.  Context does matter with language.  Every linguist will tell you that . . . 

     

     



    I totally agree. The word in and of itself may be derogatory, but how it is used can change the way it is perceived. But the relationship between messenger and recipient also factores in. Every time I meet one of my friends we say hi by calling each other a very derogatory word. It's okay between him and me, but would be totally out of order in any other setting.

    In all communication it is important to remember, that it is the recipient who determines then content of the message. If a message is ill received, the messenger has a problem - not the recipient.

    That is why communication is a hard thing.

     

     

     

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: ESPN keeping racist comments quiet

    In response to DanishPastry's comment:

     

    In response to prolate0spheroid's comment:

     

     

     

    In response to Muzwell's comment:

     

    The word IS derogatory, and shouldn't be uttered by anybody. To say otherwise is to endorse a double standard. Context doesn't matter. 

    Just the fact that we're analyzing whether this guy said it to that guy and it's OK because they're both black or it isn't OK because one of the guys is lighter skinned, or he uses proper English when he speaks and the other guy is darker and he's from the hood....pretzel logic or what?

    Robbery is wrong, but if I rob from a bank it's not as bad as if I steal a woman's purse, right? 

    Use of the word is classless and wrong no matter who uses it and no matter the context. That's a fact and not a debatable point. Otherwise, it's a double standard. So if you think it's OK depending on "context," then you have to be OK with double standards.

     



    Yes, life is complex.  Things aren't quite as simplistic as you portray them.  Context does matter with language.  Every linguist will tell you that . . . 

     

     

     

     



    I totally agree. The word in and of itself may be derogatory, but howit is used can change the way it is perceived. But the relationship between messenger and recipient also factores in. Every time I meet one of my friends we say hi by calling each other a very derogatory word. It's okay between him and me, but would be totally out of order in any other setting.

     

     

    In all communication it is important to remember, that it is the recipient who determines then content of the message. If a message is ill received, the messenger has a problem - not the recipient.

    That is why communication is a hard thing.

     

     

     

     



    Of course.  This is linguistics 101. It's why things like double entendre are possible.  Muzwell is using a rhetorical device that is pretty common in American political discourse.  You dismiss certain complexities as irrelevant, than repeat what on the surface seems an irrefutable and completely logical truism. But it works only because you've ignored relevant complexity. It's a device used to stifle real thought and instead justify predetermined conclusions.

     

    This one, however, is rather ineffective, because even children know that context matters in language. It's why they laugh at word games.

     

     

     
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