Evaluating the O-Line

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from KyleCleric2. Show KyleCleric2's posts

    Evaluating the O-Line

     

    Here are just some statistics on last year's offensive line performance.

     

    Matt Light 7.5 sacks allowed (16 starts)
    Logan Mankins 5.0 sacks allowed (16 starts)
    Dan Koppen 4.5 sacks allowed (16 starts)
    Stephen Neal 2.0 sacks allowed (9 starts)
    Nick Kaczur 3.0 sacks allowed (14 starts)

     

    Run blocking:

    Player POA att. Yds Avg POA pct.
    Matt Light, LT 141 777 5.5 90.1
    Mark LeVoir, LT 56 221 3.9 89.3
    Logan Mankins, LG 223 1,119 5.0 91.0
    Dan Koppen, C 197 952 4.8 84.3
    Stephen Neal, RG 117 557 4.9 94.0
    Billy Yates, RG 63 297 4.7 84.1
    Nick Kaczur, RT 106 636 6.0 86.8
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from wozzy. Show wozzy's posts

    Re: Evaluating the O-Line

    Our very good and talented guards would be better served with big mountainous tackles like O'Callaghan and Vollmer on either side of them, our tightends wouldn't be restricted to pass blocking as much if they didn't have to make up for Light and Kaczur's deficiencies against pass rushers all the time.

    Sats are hard to tabulate for offensive and defensive linemen and are often unfair, often the players work in tandem to create holes or pass block.  I like the future of our line, health providing and as long as Dante Scarnecchia is there to teach these young guys. 
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from zbellino. Show zbellino's posts

    Re: Evaluating the O-Line

    A word on stats though.

    In general left side players are matched up against the best defenders on the other team. I would also give each player a few mulligans considering Cassel really cost the team a lot of sacks last season by holding on to the ball.

    In addition LT's rarely recieve help from TE's, their DE/OLB is rarely moved out to cover a TE or slot guy, unlike a RT, and the QB can't see if they are getting beat on his blindside, meaning it is much harder to avoid a sack if they do make a mistake.

    So people need to factor in these things when interpreting the digits. RT/RG have a much easier time performing on these metrics than LT/LG players.

    That said, they were great run blockers last season for sure. Especially factoring how hodge-podge the RB crew was.

    And Cassel or no Cassel Light had his worst season as a pro, and looked more like a RT last season than a LT, where he would benefit from facing up against the second best pass rusher on the opposing team.

    He was one of the top five or ten pass-pro LT's in football for the better part of a decade, but last season was middle of the pack at best. That doesn't cut it when your offense puts the ball up 30-35 times a game.

    The problem is finding a replacement who can actually do the job better.

    Or hoping it was just an off year plus Cassel that led to the poor metric?

    I still hope for the latter. 30 is kind of young to go into a tail spin. Most OL players are solid into their mid 30's. 

    The other obvious thing is hoping Neal can stay healthy a whole season. This line is night and day when he is and isn't in there. I hope some of the draftees/signings can be some good short term depth there. 

    Signs are good on that front as he had nine games healthy last season recovering from 2007's injury, and Ne missing the playoffs should actually pay dividends in the overall health of the team.

    Going deep into the playoffs every single season wears a team down, especially the big men and running backs.

    Despite the cries of some people, I am content (for the most part) with this line going into 2009. Although I must admit I would be happy to see Kaczur get beat out by someone in camp.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from themightypatriots. Show themightypatriots's posts

    Re: Evaluating the O-Line

    Can someone explain what "point of attack" means and how it is measured?
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from zbellino. Show zbellino's posts

    Re: Evaluating the O-Line

    [QUOTE]Can someone explain what "point of attack" means and how it is measured?
    Posted by themightypatriots[/QUOTE]

    It is a measure of who wins the one-on-one battle at the point of attack. It is meant to remove how good the RB is from the equation. YPC can tell us a little, but not the whole story.

    Thus the POA stat is used for defensive line and offensive line players. Higher percentages are better. It is slanted in favor of offensive lineman.

    A "great" defensive lineman will have a POA like 20%. A very good offensive lineman will have above 90%. 80% is the lowest a pro can really go. Something approaching 95% is as good as it gets.

    On defense the POA should be above 10%. A very good defender will have a POA around 15%. And an excellent defender will have something closer to 20%.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from BostonBobBlowhard. Show BostonBobBlowhard's posts

    Re: Evaluating the O-Line

    [QUOTE]  Here are just some statistics on last year's offensive line performance.   Matt Light 7.5 sacks allowed (16 starts) Logan Mankins 5.0 sacks allowed (16 starts) Dan Koppen 4.5 sacks allowed (16 starts) Stephen Neal 2.0 sacks allowed (9 starts) Nick Kaczur 3.0 sacks allowed (14 starts)   Run blocking: Player POA att. Yds Avg POA pct. Matt Light , LT 141 777 5.5 90.1 Mark LeVoir , LT 56 221 3.9 89.3 Logan Mankins , LG 223 1,119 5.0 91.0 Dan Koppen , C 197 952 4.8 84.3 Stephen Neal , RG 117 557 4.9 94.0 Billy Yates , RG 63 297 4.7 84.1 Nick Kaczur , RT 106 636 6.0 86.8
    Posted by KyleCleric2[/QUOTE]

    Who makes up these stats? This post must be from the guy who did subprime derivative trading for Lehman Brothers.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from BostonBobBlowhard. Show BostonBobBlowhard's posts

    Re: Evaluating the O-Line

    [QUOTE]A word on stats though. In general left side players are matched up against the best defenders on the other team. I would also give each player a few mulligans considering Cassel really cost the team a lot of sacks last season by holding on to the ball. In addition LT's rarely recieve help from TE's, their DE/OLB is rarely moved out to cover a TE or slot guy, unlike a RT, and the QB can't see if they are getting beat on his blindside, meaning it is much harder to avoid a sack if they do make a mistake. So people need to factor in these things when interpreting the digits. RT/RG have a much easier time performing on these metrics than LT/LG players. That said, they were great run blockers last season for sure. Especially factoring how hodge-podge the RB crew was. And Cassel or no Cassel Light had his worst season as a pro, and looked more like a RT last season than a LT, where he would benefit from facing up against the second best pass rusher on the opposing team. He was one of the top five or ten pass-pro LT's in football for the better part of a decade, but last season was middle of the pack at best. That doesn't cut it when your offense puts the ball up 30-35 times a game. The problem is finding a replacement who can actually do the job better. Or hoping it was just an off year plus Cassel that led to the poor metric? I still hope for the latter. 30 is kind of young to go into a tail spin. Most OL players are solid into their mid 30's.  The other obvious thing is hoping Neal can stay healthy a whole season. This line is night and day when he is and isn't in there. I hope some of the draftees/signings can be some good short term depth there.  Signs are good on that front as he had nine games healthy last season recovering from 2007's injury, and Ne missing the playoffs should actually pay dividends in the overall health of the team. Going deep into the playoffs every single season wears a team down, especially the big men and running backs. Despite the cries of some people, I am content (for the most part) with this line going into 2009. Although I must admit I would be happy to see Kaczur get beat out by someone in camp.
    Posted by zbellino[/QUOTE]

    You don't just find top LT's at K-Mart. Even less than spectacular LT's get drafted in the top ten every year. This is going to be a tough spot to fill.
     
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