Finally

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Finally

     

    Two days after returning from a vacation in Europe and Israel, Patriots owner Robert Kraft finally broke his silence on Monday about Aaron Hernandez’s arrest on a murder charge and subsequent release from the team.

    “No one in our organization was aware of any of these kind of connections. If it’s true, I’m just shocked,” Kraft said in his office at Gillette Stadium. “Our whole organization has been duped.”

    Kraft, who has owned the Patriots since 1994, said he was “limited” in what he could discuss Monday because of “an ongoing criminal investigation, as well as other potential civil proceedings.” It is unclear if the family of Odin Lloyd, the victim in Hernandez’s murder case, will attempt to sue the Patriots.

    But Kraft said it “is important that our fan base hear directly from our organization.” Kraft said the team knew Hernandez was “immature,” but didn’t think his off-field activities would ever lead to a murder charge.

    In fact, the Patriots were willing to draft Hernandez because they believed he had owned up to his past. Kraft produced a letter on Monday that Hernandez sent to the Patriots on April 16, 2010, six days before the NFL Draft.

    In the letter, addressed to Patriots’ personnel director Nick Caserio and written with help from Hernandez’s agents at Athletes First, Hernandez admitted to recreational drug use while at the University of Florida (marijuana) and said he would “willfully” submit to bi-weekly drug testing during his rookie season if the Patriots were willing to draft him (eight drug tests during the regular season). Hernandez then offered to reimburse the team for any money he would earn if he were to test positive and earn a suspension.

    “My point is simple – if I fail a drug test, I do not deserve that portion of the money,” Hernandez wrote. “I realize this offer is somewhat unorthodox, but it is also the only way I could think of to let you know how serious I am about reaching my potential in the NFL.”

    Kraft said the Patriots felt comfortable drafting Hernandez in the fourth round after receiving this letter, and didn’t believe he had any other major off-field issues.

    “Here’s a guy writing a letter, taking responsibility,” Kraft said. “The only thing I ever heard on Aaron Hernandez was he was very young, immature and potentially had problems presented in this letter. Never saw signs of anything else.”

    Kraft said Hernandez “knew how to push my buttons.” Hernandez, a native of Bristol, Conn., told Kraft after being drafted that the first jersey he owned was a Drew Bledsoe Patriots jersey.

    “He was a New England kid who was a Patriot. I thought it was cool,” Kraft said.

    Hernandez often greeted Kraft with a kiss on the cheek, and donated $50,000 to the Myra Kraft Giving Back Fund after signing a contract extension before the 2012 season that paid him $16 million guaranteed, with a maximum value of $40 million.

    Kraft said he tried to give Hernandez the $50,000 back, but Hernandez insisted that the foundation keep it.

    “He wanted to be a role model for the Hispanic community. He said that when he signed his contract,” Kraft said. “He said, ‘You gave me a second chance,’ and I believed him.”

    Kraft said all he knew about Hernandez is what happened inside the practice facility at Gillette Stadium, and that for three years Hernandez was a model football player. He noted that Bill Belichick said that Hernandez had the best training camp of any Patriots player last August, after Hernandez had signed his contract extension.

    “I only know what goes on inside this building. We don’t put private eyes on people,” Kraft said. “When he was in this building, I was never exposed to anything where he was not positive. He was always polite, respectful.”

    Kraft didn’t say whether or not the team will be less willing in the future to take on players with character risks, but “you can be sure we’ll be looking at our procedures and auditing how we do things.”

    Kraft certainly wishes he had done more research on Hernandez’s off-field activities before giving him the big contract extension last August, but felt that signing Hernandez to a long-term deal was the best move for the team at the time.

    Hernandez’s rookie contract was supposed to run through the 2013 season, and the Patriots felt like they could get better value if they had signed him to a long-term deal before he reached free agency.

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from CatfishHunter. Show CatfishHunter's posts

    Re: Finally

    Rkarp:

    Let's be honest here.  Bob Kraft gave a statement and it seems to me he presented a fair assessment of his and  the team's perspective of the situation.

    But you were insistent that he or BB needed to address the media.  You said they had to do it.

    What substantive information did you learn from this statement?

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Finally

    Saying nothing IMO spoke volumes that the Pats knew something. By saying that they did not, they close the door on all of the speculation....not that I believe him. I fully believe Meyer was very forthcoming with BB on who and what they were drafting....and it wasn't just " he smokes some pot in his free time".

    Lets face it, Kraft couldn't say " we were warned this was a very bad guy, but we drafted him anyways", nor could he say " the NFL had a file on this guy 2 inches thick, and 17 teams had him off the board, but we tried to outsmart everyone"....could he?

    Also, reading between the lines, and hearing whispers from numerous people, the Pats are expecting legal issues with the monies not paid out to Hern. 

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from pcmIV. Show pcmIV's posts

    Re: Finally

    In response to rkarp's comment:

    Saying nothing IMO spoke volumes that the Pats knew something. By saying that they did not, they close the door on all of the speculation....not that I believe him. I fully believe Meyer was very forthcoming with BB on who and what they were drafting....and it wasn't just " he smokes some pot in his free time".

    Lets face it, Kraft couldn't say " we were warned this was a very bad guy, but we drafted him anyways", nor could he say " the NFL had a file on this guy 2 inches thick, and 17 teams had him off the board, but we tried to outsmart everyone"....could he?



    Whether you like it or not you have no evidence for any of this.  If all of this were true why is it only coming out now after Hernandez was implicated in the murder.  None of these "reports" were mentioned when the Patriots drafted him and they weren't mentioned when he was signed to an extension either.  As for the draft boards thing notice how again these "reports" are only coming out now.  Sounds like a bunch of @ss covering by a bunch of NFL teams to me.  You have no more evidence for any of this than Rusty does when he asserts that Brady is running the dam team.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from CatfishHunter. Show CatfishHunter's posts

    Re: Finally

    In response to rkarp's comment:

    Saying nothing IMO spoke volumes that the Pats knew something. By saying that they did not, they close the door on all of the speculation....not that I believe him. I fully believe Meyer was very forthcoming with BB on who and what they were drafting....and it wasn't just " he smokes some pot in his free time".

    Lets face it, Kraft couldn't say " we were warned this was a very bad guy, but we drafted him anyways", nor could he say " the NFL had a file on this guy 2 inches thick, and 17 teams had him off the board, but we tried to outsmart everyone"....could he?

    Also, reading between the lines, and hearing whispers from numerous people, the Pats are expecting legal issues with the monies not paid out to Hern. 




    Huh?

    By saying they knew nothing they open it very wide for someone to come forward to produce evidence to the contrary.   You've stated very clearly here that you don't believe Kraft.  You think he is lying.   He could have said there "wasn't anything that convinced us not to pick him".  He went much further.  He said they knew nothing else.   From a public relations standpoint (if not a legal one) can you not see how embarrassing this could become if it is learned that Kraft did know more?

    I'm starting to feel you have some personal issue with Kraft that is clouding your opinion.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from newenglanderinexile. Show newenglanderinexile's posts

    Re: Finally

    In response to rkarp's comment:

    Saying nothing IMO spoke volumes that the Pats knew something. By saying that they did not, they close the door on all of the speculation....not that I believe him. I fully believe Meyer was very forthcoming with BB on who and what they were drafting....and it wasn't just " he smokes some pot in his free time".

    Lets face it, Kraft couldn't say " we were warned this was a very bad guy, but we drafted him anyways", nor could he say " the NFL had a file on this guy 2 inches thick, and 17 teams had him off the board, but we tried to outsmart everyone"....could he?

    Also, reading between the lines, and hearing whispers from numerous people, the Pats are expecting legal issues with the monies not paid out to Hern. 



    The Patriots clearly did not know anything very bad about Hernandez before signing him and before giving him a big contract.  They are not a stupid organization.  If they had known anything bad about him, they would have foreseen that it could blow up in their faces.  They are willing to take risks, but do you honesly think they would have knowingly risked something as bad as this has turned out to be?  This may destroy their whole season. 

     

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from wozzy. Show wozzy's posts

    Re: Finally

    Firing Hernandez spoke volumes...

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Finally

    In response to pcmIV's comment:

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

    Saying nothing IMO spoke volumes that the Pats knew something. By saying that they did not, they close the door on all of the speculation....not that I believe him. I fully believe Meyer was very forthcoming with BB on who and what they were drafting....and it wasn't just " he smokes some pot in his free time".

    Lets face it, Kraft couldn't say " we were warned this was a very bad guy, but we drafted him anyways", nor could he say " the NFL had a file on this guy 2 inches thick, and 17 teams had him off the board, but we tried to outsmart everyone"....could he?

     



    Whether you like it or not you have no evidence for any of this.  If all of this were true why is it only coming out now after Hernandez was implicated in the murder.  None of these "reports" were mentioned when the Patriots drafted him and they weren't mentioned when he was signed to an extension either.  As for the draft boards thing notice how again these "reports" are only coming out now.  Sounds like a bunch of @ss covering by a bunch of NFL teams to me.  You have no more evidence for any of this than Rusty does when he asserts that Brady is running the dam team.

     



    The evidence was posted in the WSJ last week. Hern shot 2 guys when he was a freshman and was identified by both guys. 10 days later they with drew their statements, letting Hern off the legal hook, with UFLa saying they would handle the discipline. The WSJ showed the police report last week to the public, With Herns name on it, even though he was a m inor. Meyer knew about the shootings. He either said nothing to BB or he did say something, and BB ignored the report.

    With this info floating around out there, shouldn't the Pats have heard something?

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Finally

    In response to russgriswold's comment:

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

    In response to pcmIV's comment:

     

     

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

     

     

     

    Saying nothing IMO spoke volumes that the Pats knew something. By saying that they did not, they close the door on all of the speculation....not that I believe him. I fully believe Meyer was very forthcoming with BB on who and what they were drafting....and it wasn't just " he smokes some pot in his free time".

    Lets face it, Kraft couldn't say " we were warned this was a very bad guy, but we drafted him anyways", nor could he say " the NFL had a file on this guy 2 inches thick, and 17 teams had him off the board, but we tried to outsmart everyone"....could he?

     

     

     



    Whether you like it or not you have no evidence for any of this.  If all of this were true why is it only coming out now after Hernandez was implicated in the murder.  None of these "reports" were mentioned when the Patriots drafted him and they weren't mentioned when he was signed to an extension either.  As for the draft boards thing notice how again these "reports" are only coming out now.  Sounds like a bunch of @ss covering by a bunch of NFL teams to me.  You have no more evidence for any of this than Rusty does when he asserts that Brady is running the dam team.

     

     

     

     

     



    The evidence was posted in the WSJ last week. Hern shot 2 guys when he was a freshman and was identified by both guys. 10 days later they with drew their statements, letting Hern off the legal hook, with UFLa saying they would handle the discipline. The WSJ showed the police report last week to the public, With Herns name on it, even though he was a m inor. Meyer knew about the shootings. He either said nothing to BB or he did say something, and BB ignored the report.

     

     

    With this info floating around out there, shouldn't the Pats have heard something?

     



    Actually, no. If the incident is never reported, how would the Pats know of it? Also, please source this supposed WSJ article.

     



    The incident was reported,a file is on record with the police with Hern's name on it. 

    ThePats would know of it because Meyer should have, or did, mention it...

    Theoretically, in a civil suit, Meyer and UFla could be in more trouble than the Pats. 

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from CatfishHunter. Show CatfishHunter's posts

    Re: Finally

    In response to russgriswold's comment:

     

    Actually, no. If the incident is never reported, how would the Pats know of it? Also, please source this supposed WSJ article.

     



    And even if the incident is true as reported what does it say when we are hearing about this now instead of when it happened?   You think it wouldn't have been newsworthy back then that an NFL team (the Pats no less) drafted a criminal?

    What it says to me is that, after the recent facts, outfits like the WSJ are dusting off their journalism skills and foraging for background information that was well hidden on draft day.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Finally

    In response to russgriswold's comment:

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

    In response to russgriswold's comment:

     

     

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

     

     

     

    In response to pcmIV's comment:

     

     

     

     

     

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Saying nothing IMO spoke volumes that the Pats knew something. By saying that they did not, they close the door on all of the speculation....not that I believe him. I fully believe Meyer was very forthcoming with BB on who and what they were drafting....and it wasn't just " he smokes some pot in his free time".

    Lets face it, Kraft couldn't say " we were warned this was a very bad guy, but we drafted him anyways", nor could he say " the NFL had a file on this guy 2 inches thick, and 17 teams had him off the board, but we tried to outsmart everyone"....could he?

     

     

     

     

     



    Whether you like it or not you have no evidence for any of this.  If all of this were true why is it only coming out now after Hernandez was implicated in the murder.  None of these "reports" were mentioned when the Patriots drafted him and they weren't mentioned when he was signed to an extension either.  As for the draft boards thing notice how again these "reports" are only coming out now.  Sounds like a bunch of @ss covering by a bunch of NFL teams to me.  You have no more evidence for any of this than Rusty does when he asserts that Brady is running the dam team.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     



    The evidence was posted in the WSJ last week. Hern shot 2 guys when he was a freshman and was identified by both guys. 10 days later they with drew their statements, letting Hern off the legal hook, with UFLa saying they would handle the discipline. The WSJ showed the police report last week to the public, With Herns name on it, even though he was a m inor. Meyer knew about the shootings. He either said nothing to BB or he did say something, and BB ignored the report.

     

     

     

     

    With this info floating around out there, shouldn't the Pats have heard something?

     

     

     



    Actually, no. If the incident is never reported, how would the Pats know of it? Also, please source this supposed WSJ article.

     

     

     

     

     



    The incident was reported,a file is on record with the police with Hern's name on it. 

     

     

    ThePats would know of it because Meyer should have, or did, mention it...

    Theoretically, in a civil suit, Meyer and UFla could be in more trouble than the Pats. 

     




    Source the article I said. 

     



    Can't source the WSJ article as it is a paid site, which I do not belong to. Here's ESPN's take;

    From ESPN’s Kelly Naqi:

    The 2007 Gainesville shooting happened on Sept. 30, when Hernandez was a 17 year old freshman with the Gators. The two men and a friend of theirs had left a nightclub and were in their car stopped at a light blocks away when their vehicle was fired upon, according to the statements two of the men gave to police. Corey Smith, a 28-year-old at the time who was sitting in the front passenger seat, was shot in back of the head. Justin Glass, the 19-year-old driver, was shot in the arm. Randall Cason, sitting in the back seat behind Smith, was unharmed.

    While several witnesses told police the shooter was a black male, Cason said there were two suspects.

    Cason, then 20, told police that shooter was a “Hawaiian” or “Hispanic” male who had a large muscular build, stood about 6-foot-3 or 6-foot-4, weighed about 230 or 240 pounds and had a lot of tattoos. Cason said there was also a black male with the shooter, and Cason identified the black male as Reggie Nelson, a former Florida Gator who was a rookie with the Jacksonville Jaguars. Nelson, in an interview with the Gainesville police, said he had been at the nightclub earlier but denied he was even on the same street as the shooting.

    “As they were waiting for the light to change, the Hawaiian football player and Reggie Nelson walked up to their car on the right side,” the police report says, citing what Cason told detectives. “Then without saying a work (sic), the Hawaiian pointed a small handgun in the front right window and fired five quick shots. Cason saw Smith slump over with blood coming out of the back of the head, at which time the Hawaiian and Nelson took off running towards McDonalds.”

    The police report says that Nelson and Hernandez had been in The Venue nightclub along with two other Gator players, Mike and Maurkice Pouncey, twins who now both play in the NFL. After the shooting, investigators interviewed Cason at Shands hospital. Cason is described as distraught and emotional and an officer indicated Cason said several times “it should have been him that had been shot and not Cory (sic).” Cason told investigators that a week earlier his brother had gotten into an altercation with several Florida football players.

    Nelson told investigators that he was at The Venue with several friends that night. He said he later saw Aaron Hernandez and the Pouncey twins, and Hernandez told him that one of the twins had his necklace snatched by Cason. After the club closed, one of the twins confirmed the story to Nelson. Nelson said he went to speak to Cason, advised that he didn’t want any trouble and the two parted on good terms. He said he was not on West University Avenue, the street where the shooting took place, when Smith and Glass were shot.

    Two days after the shooting, Gainesville police Lt. Keith Kameg was quoted in the Orlando Sentinel as saying neither Hernandez nor Nelson were suspects. Police have also said that they briefly interviewed Hernandez about the shooting. But, according to the police report, Hernandez declined to speak to Gainesville police nine days after the shooting. Hernandez’s name is redacted from the report because he was 17 at the time, so was considered a minor. However, there is one reference to Hernandez in which his name is not redacted. In that section under “Aaron Hernandez,” the report says detectives attempted to speak to Hernandez on Oct. 9 but that “he invoked his right to counsel.”

    That same day Cason, who had originally said Nelson and the Hawaiian or Hispanic male were the suspects, “rescinded his identification of Aaron Hernandez and Reggie Nelson,” according to the report. While Hernandez’ name was redacted in the document, it was the first time the report indicated that Cason had positively identified Hernandez as the shooter at some point.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Finally

    In response to CatfishHunter's comment:

    In response to russgriswold's comment:

     

     

    Actually, no. If the incident is never reported, how would the Pats know of it? Also, please source this supposed WSJ article.

     

     



    And even if the incident is true as reported what does it say when we are hearing about this now instead of when it happened?   You think it wouldn't have been newsworthy back then that an NFL team (the Pats no less) drafted a criminal?

     

    What it says to me is that, after the recent facts, outfits like the WSJ are dusting off their journalism skills and foraging for background information that was well hidden on draft day.



    Yeah,you are right. I guess that's why 17 teams had him off the board...he just smoked a little weed

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from CatfishHunter. Show CatfishHunter's posts

    Re: Finally

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     


    Yeah,you are right. I guess that's why 17 teams had him off the board...he just smoked a little weed

     



    You know that 17 teams took AH off their boards because they said it.

    You know Kraft had more information about AH because he didn't say it.

    Got it.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from BostonSportsFan111. Show BostonSportsFan111's posts

    Re: Finally

    In response to rkarp's comment:

    In response to russgriswold's comment:

     

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

     

     

    In response to russgriswold's comment:

     

     

     

     

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

     

     

     

     

     

    In response to pcmIV's comment:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Saying nothing IMO spoke volumes that the Pats knew something. By saying that they did not, they close the door on all of the speculation....not that I believe him. I fully believe Meyer was very forthcoming with BB on who and what they were drafting....and it wasn't just " he smokes some pot in his free time".

    Lets face it, Kraft couldn't say " we were warned this was a very bad guy, but we drafted him anyways", nor could he say " the NFL had a file on this guy 2 inches thick, and 17 teams had him off the board, but we tried to outsmart everyone"....could he?

     

     

     

     

     

     



    Whether you like it or not you have no evidence for any of this.  If all of this were true why is it only coming out now after Hernandez was implicated in the murder.  None of these "reports" were mentioned when the Patriots drafted him and they weren't mentioned when he was signed to an extension either.  As for the draft boards thing notice how again these "reports" are only coming out now.  Sounds like a bunch of @ss covering by a bunch of NFL teams to me.  You have no more evidence for any of this than Rusty does when he asserts that Brady is running the dam team.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     



    The evidence was posted in the WSJ last week. Hern shot 2 guys when he was a freshman and was identified by both guys. 10 days later they with drew their statements, letting Hern off the legal hook, with UFLa saying they would handle the discipline. The WSJ showed the police report last week to the public, With Herns name on it, even though he was a m inor. Meyer knew about the shootings. He either said nothing to BB or he did say something, and BB ignored the report.

     

     

     

     

     

    With this info floating around out there, shouldn't the Pats have heard something?

     

     

     

     



    Actually, no. If the incident is never reported, how would the Pats know of it? Also, please source this supposed WSJ article.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     



    The incident was reported,a file is on record with the police with Hern's name on it. 

     

     

     

    ThePats would know of it because Meyer should have, or did, mention it...

    Theoretically, in a civil suit, Meyer and UFla could be in more trouble than the Pats. 

     

     




    Source the article I said. 

     

     

     



    Can't source the WSJ article as it is a paid site, which I do not belong to. Here's ESPN's take;

     

    From ESPN’s Kelly Naqi:

    The 2007 Gainesville shooting happened on Sept. 30, when Hernandez was a 17 year old freshman with the Gators. The two men and a friend of theirs had left a nightclub and were in their car stopped at a light blocks away when their vehicle was fired upon, according to the statements two of the men gave to police. Corey Smith, a 28-year-old at the time who was sitting in the front passenger seat, was shot in back of the head. Justin Glass, the 19-year-old driver, was shot in the arm. Randall Cason, sitting in the back seat behind Smith, was unharmed.

    While several witnesses told police the shooter was a black male, Cason said there were two suspects.

    Cason, then 20, told police that shooter was a “Hawaiian” or “Hispanic” male who had a large muscular build, stood about 6-foot-3 or 6-foot-4, weighed about 230 or 240 pounds and had a lot of tattoos. Cason said there was also a black male with the shooter, and Cason identified the black male as Reggie Nelson, a former Florida Gator who was a rookie with the Jacksonville Jaguars. Nelson, in an interview with the Gainesville police, said he had been at the nightclub earlier but denied he was even on the same street as the shooting.

    “As they were waiting for the light to change, the Hawaiian football player and Reggie Nelson walked up to their car on the right side,” the police report says, citing what Cason told detectives. “Then without saying a work (sic), the Hawaiian pointed a small handgun in the front right window and fired five quick shots. Cason saw Smith slump over with blood coming out of the back of the head, at which time the Hawaiian and Nelson took off running towards McDonalds.”

    The police report says that Nelson and Hernandez had been in The Venue nightclub along with two other Gator players, Mike and Maurkice Pouncey, twins who now both play in the NFL. After the shooting, investigators interviewed Cason at Shands hospital. Cason is described as distraught and emotional and an officer indicated Cason said several times “it should have been him that had been shot and not Cory (sic).” Cason told investigators that a week earlier his brother had gotten into an altercation with several Florida football players.

    Nelson told investigators that he was at The Venue with several friends that night. He said he later saw Aaron Hernandez and the Pouncey twins, and Hernandez told him that one of the twins had his necklace snatched by Cason. After the club closed, one of the twins confirmed the story to Nelson. Nelson said he went to speak to Cason, advised that he didn’t want any trouble and the two parted on good terms. He said he was not on West University Avenue, the street where the shooting took place, when Smith and Glass were shot.

    Two days after the shooting, Gainesville police Lt. Keith Kameg was quoted in the Orlando Sentinel as saying neither Hernandez nor Nelson were suspects. Police have also said that they briefly interviewed Hernandez about the shooting. But, according to the police report, Hernandez declined to speak to Gainesville police nine days after the shooting. Hernandez’s name is redacted from the report because he was 17 at the time, so was considered a minor. However, there is one reference to Hernandez in which his name is not redacted. In that section under “Aaron Hernandez,” the report says detectives attempted to speak to Hernandez on Oct. 9 but that “he invoked his right to counsel.”

    That same day Cason, who had originally said Nelson and the Hawaiian or Hispanic male were the suspects, “rescinded his identification of Aaron Hernandez and Reggie Nelson,” according to the report. While Hernandez’ name was redacted in the document, it was the first time the report indicated that Cason had positively identified Hernandez as the shooter at some point.



    And when did this ESPN article come out? July 3rd, 2013. Not in 2007 when it happened, not in 2010 when the Patriots drafted him, and not in 2012 when the Pats resigned him. None of this information was public before the shooting last month when he became America's most notorious criminal.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from ATJ. Show ATJ's posts

    Re: Finally

    Couple of points:

    Point #1 - I posted in writing that there would be no statement to the media by Kraft, BB or the Pats organization.  I was wrong. I'm surprised, but I was wrong.

    Point #2 - Robert Kraft was under no obligation to anyone to make that statement.  

    Point #3 - All of this 20/20 hindsight and speculation about who knew what when is a pointless, empty exercise.  It accomplishes what, exactly?

     

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from bostatewarrior. Show bostatewarrior's posts

    Re: Finally

    Rkarp, I don't usually get into this back and forth stuff.  But everything I have read contradicts you.  Did you hear what Urban Meyer said over the week end?  I don't think you did.

    Did you know that the New York Times said that when he was a freshman at Florida that police recommended that Hernandez be charaged in a shooting At a bar.  The New York times then corrected the story saying it was their mistake.  He and three teammates were questioned but the Times got the story wrong and admitted it.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from digger0862. Show digger0862's posts

    Re: Finally

    rkarp works with the media. Enough said.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from anonymis. Show anonymis's posts

    Re: Finally

    IMO, am disappointed w/ Kraft's statement cuz it's specifically damage control by his PR peeps regarding the Kraft/Patriot branding.

    He should have just said no comment and there is no way for people to predict individual behavior/criminal activities such as Hernandez.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from ghostofjri37. Show ghostofjri37's posts

    Re: Finally

    In response to rkarp's comment:

     

     



    Yeah,you are right. I guess that's why 17 teams had him off the board...he just smoked a little weed

     

    [/QUOTE]


    If 17 teams had him off the board at draft time we would have heard about it. Seems pretty convenient to me that the 17 teams are only coming forward now. 

    I have searched for articles on the 2010 draft and the majority of the articles mentioned  his penchant for chronic and a handful of teams were very leery of his drug use. 

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Finally

    Yeah, the 4 of you guys are right. The rest of us in the moral majority and the 2000 people that returned the jerseys are simply looking to criticize Kraft and they are aligned with me, ESPN in the anti BB agenda. 

    It is shocking that the 4 of you are naive enough to think the Gators/Meyer knew nothing and said nothing to BB. 

    it is equally shocking that the 4 of you feel the Pats don't need to say anything to their fans, their sponsors or the community in general about the criminal behavior of some one in their employ.

     

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from mthurl. Show mthurl's posts

    Re: Finally


    Listening to 98.5 today they were saying that Beddard discovered that the Patriots told Hernandez to get out of town for a while in Febuary and go to California. He was pulled over (he wasn't the driver) while swerving in and out of traffic reaching speeds of 110mph...drunk. He yelled to the trooper "it's ok, I'm Aaron Hernandez". Earlier this year we were all excited about reports he was in California working out with Brady and he was going to be his new slot guy...never happened...it's now being reported he never saw Brady and it was a ll a scheme to get this trouble maker out of town where he was getting into a little trouble with the law.

    I have no idea if this was brought up during Kraft's press conference (which consisted of three writers in his office today), but this was talked about on the radio today. The people talking about it were embarrassed they didn't do any investigating to the reports that Brady and Hernandez were working out together, when in fact they weren't.

     
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  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from tanbass. Show tanbass's posts

    Re: Finally

    I'm still trying to figure out what Rkarp really wants here. You got your silly statement from the Pats, yet you still act like it isn't good enough.

    Bottom line is that the statement from Kraft didn't change anything. It's what you said you wanted, but somehow, you (still) aren't satisfied.

    Why is it so hard for you to accept that a few very smart people got burned here? Do you have to play the blame game in every aspect of your life? It's painfully obvious that you want to see more people fall for this mistake made by AH.

    You seriously act like Felger. No matter what happens in this town for sports, you view and point out the negative side, and continue to harp on it. Almost like you have a need for negativity. Probably just the way you're built.

    I honestly can't even comprehend how someone goes through life always looking at the glass as half empty.....how can one ever truly be happy living like that? I'm convinced that some people are only happy when they're miserable....if that makes any sense...

     

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from tanbass. Show tanbass's posts

    Re: Finally

    In response to MelWitt's comment:

    dirtbagism



    Love the word!! LOL

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from BostonSportsFan111. Show BostonSportsFan111's posts

    Re: Finally

    How much could Patriots have known about Hernandez?

    By Ben Volin |  GLOBE STAFF     JULY 07, 2013

    There’s a nagging question still lingering over the Aaron Hernandez murder case as the Patriots distance themselves from their former star tight end: Just how much was the team supposed to know about, and interfere with, Hernandez’s off-field activities?

     

    They knew he wasn’t exactly a Boy Scout when they drafted Hernandez in the fourth round in 2010, as his affinity for marijuana and association with unsavory people were well-known by NFL front offices. Former Colts executive Bill Polian said last week that Hernandez, widely regarded as a first- or second-round talent, was not on his team’s draft board.

     

    The Patriots then had Hernandez under their employ for three years, and even gave him a contract extension last August that for practical purposes was worth three years and $16 million, fully guaranteed.

     

    Shouldn’t the Patriots have known what Hernandez was up to off the field — or at least known enough not to entrust him with a big contract and a major role on the team?

     

     

    The answer, as usual, is complicated.

     

    In hindsight, the pieces all add up; the alleged gun-related incidents that involved him in college and in South Florida; the loyalty to his friends from blue-collar Bristol, Conn., following the sudden death of his father when Hernandez was 16; reports of another double homicide and domestic incidents with his girlfriend that are now emerging; the lack of regard for the University of Florida’s drug-testing policies.

     

    But look at Hernandez’s rap sheet before this murder charge. It’s clean.

     

    The worst thing he did in college (officially) was fail a handful of drug tests for marijuana — which doesn’t tell the NFL he is a bad person, just that he’s undisciplined and is likely a four-game drug suspension waiting to happen.

     

    And for three years in New England, Hernandez did everything Bill Belichick asked of him football-wise, according to a team source. He showed up to meetings and practices on time, practiced hard, stayed in shape, was very coachable, and starred on the field, scoring 18 touchdowns in three seasons. Just as importantly, he didn’t fail one NFL drug test in three seasons.

     

    But when it came to Hernandez’s off-field activities, he would tune out and occasionally become angry when a coach or employee suggested he stop hanging out with some of his old friends from Connecticut.

     

    It corroborates what the Wall Street Journal reported last week, that a personality test given to Hernandez before the 2010 draft gave him a perfect 10 for “Focus,” 9s in “Self-Efficacy” and “Receptivity to Coaching,” and a 7 for “Dedication.” He also scored a 1 for “Social Maturity.”

     

    The Patriots knew he was hanging out with unsavory people, but how much can a team really dictate what a player does off the field?

     

    The Patriots have control over their players during the season — from late July to the Super Bowl — and then from mid-April to mid-June during offseason workouts. They declined to say how many security and/or operations personnel they employ, but a former operations coordinator for multiple NFL teams said teams typically bring to road games three operations employees and 5-7 security officials, who generally are former police officers and detectives.

     

    But from February to April, and mid-June to late-July, the players scatter across the country. Teams conduct thorough background checks on draft prospects, but monitoring their daily whereabouts once they’re in the league is impractical.

     

    “It’s tough. You can’t baby-sit 61 players 24/7. You have to let them live their lives,” the operations executive said. “You have your guys you know are more likely to get into trouble, but sometimes even the good ones surprise you. A guy can be good 99 percent of the time, but the one mistake he makes can make the news.”

     

    Hernandez moved to California in February to work out with Tom Brady and rehab his shoulder with a specialist. The Patriots are supposed to monitor his every move out there and know with whom he is hanging out?

     

    “Teams don’t follow their players around or anything like that. Teams focus on giving guys the information and tools to protect themselves,” the operations executive said. “The first thing we told guys was, ‘Don’t drink and drive. And don’t be in suspicious places late at night.’ But the guys are going to do what they want. Some listen. Some don’t.”

     

    Teams must straddle a fine line when advising their players. A good way to lose the locker room is to have coaches and football employees be a little too involved in players’ lives.

     

    “In my experience, teams want to protect their investment in players but won’t cross the line into invasion of privacy to do so,” the operations executive said.

     

    “Because I managed pretty much everything on the road, when we were on away trips everything kind of flowed through the operations staff. Players had my cellphone [number] and if they needed a cab, a ride, a hotel room or anything, I would facilitate it. Some agents have guys who do the same thing.

     

    “We had a good knowledge of the areas we were in and strong relationships with hotels and their security, just to keep any low-level problems in-house — maybe a dustup between a couple of players in a meeting room or someone breaking curfew.

     

    “I interacted a lot with the players and knew what a lot of them did on weekends or on certain nights. But I was never asked by the organization to divulge that info.”

     

    The Patriots’ top brass probably knows it should have done more diligence on Hernandez, or built more protection into his big contract extension.

     

    Then again, the end of Brady’s career is on the horizon, the Patriots want another Super Bowl title (or two), and Hernandez was a heck of a player. And there are plenty of NFL players who smoke marijuana and hang out with shady friends who don’t commit murder.

     

    Ultimately, Hernandez is a 23-year-old man who made his own choices, no matter how much guidance the Patriots did or didn’t give him.


     

     
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