Has the era of the fullback ended before it really began?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Has the era of the fullback ended before it really began?

    Lots of talk in the offseason about how McDaniels was going to revitalize the offense by incorporating a fullback and running more out of the I formation with a blocking back.

    With the release of Hilliard there are now no fullbacks on the roster.  I suspect McDaniels would still like to pick one up, but as of now the fullback seems not to be a big part of the offense.  I know TEs can sometimes play like FBs--and we have a plethora of (mostly injured) TEs--but for now the offense looks like a one back offense, with varying mixtures of TEs and WRs in the remaining four eligible positions.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: Has the era of the fullback ended before it really began?

    You may have noticed Hernandez was the receiving FB, and we bring in a big body like Connoly/Thomas/whoever to lead block. Now with Herns injury and facing the Ravens stout front 7, I wouldn't expect to see much use of a FB.

     

    Are you attempting to suggest that McD is not using an entirely different offensive philosophy?

     

    You exhaust me.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from wozzy. Show wozzy's posts

    Re: Has the era of the fullback ended before it really began?

    I guess we're going to stop running now and go back to purely passing despite the success of the run game to start the season? 

    I mean Ridely is only averaging 5 yards a carry, ranked 5th in the NFL in yards, tied with Law Firm (ironically) for 7th in attempts a game, oh yeah ranked #1 in first down runs... nothing has changed at all, this is still a passing league after all?

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: Has the era of the fullback ended before it really began?

    It's a bit of a stretch to say Hernandez was used regularly as a FB--at least as the FB position is normally defined.  Most often he was lined up along the LOS and used as a traditional TE, a slot receiver, or a WR.  They rarely lined him up in the backfield.  This year (and also last year) they frequently slid him at the snap on running plays into the backfield from his TE position where he might block more in the center of the line, but this isn't really quite the same as being a FB.


    As far as running the ball, I think they continue to do that a lot as they should with Ridley's success.  It just seems from last week's plays and from the recent roster moves that they are going to use more one-back formations.  The I-formation with a FB just doesn't look like a regular part of this offense, except in goal line situations when we use an O- or D- lineman as the FB. This could change, but as of now there's no FB on the roster.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from wozzy. Show wozzy's posts

    Re: Has the era of the fullback ended before it really began?

    When they did line up at fullback and they did with a certain frequency, Hernandez was there, call him an H-Back like Dallas Clark, Jay Novachek or Keith Byers if you want but it's his skill set that made him unique. Receivers are a dime a dozen, yet a receiver who blocks like Hines Ward or Edelmen is handy.  Bolden is another option at FB if he shows the blocking capability.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from seattlepat70. Show seattlepat70's posts

    Re: Has the era of the fullback ended before it really began?

    maybe it's just because they did not find the right fb. if they are looking for a hern body-type who actually has played the position, there's ryan hewitt of stanford. a strong 6-4, 248, really good at leading the rb, and can catch every now and then. a junior, but my guess is he comes out in 2013.

     

     

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from BubbaInHawaii. Show BubbaInHawaii's posts

    Re: Has the era of the fullback ended before it really began?

    In response to wozzy's comment:

     

    I guess we're going to stop running now and go back to purely passing despite the success of the run game to start the season? 

    I mean Ridely is only averaging 5 yards a carry, ranked 5th in the NFL in yards, tied with Law Firm (ironically) for 7th in attempts a game, oh yeah ranked #1 in first down runs... nothing has changed at all, this is still a passing league after all?

     




    hope not.....

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from BubbaInHawaii. Show BubbaInHawaii's posts

    Re: Has the era of the fullback ended before it really began?

    remember the last time we had a 1,000 yrd RB?  That was when Crumpler was blocking for him....

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from BubbaInHawaii. Show BubbaInHawaii's posts

    Re: Has the era of the fullback ended before it really began?

    i think it's be interested if pats had fb who could catch, run, and block.  You can get quite a few different plays w/ same look, making it harder for opponents to defend....

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: Has the era of the fullback ended before it really began?

    In response to wozzy's comment:

    When they did line up at fullback and they did with a certain frequency, Hernandez was there, call him an H-Back like Dallas Clark, Jay Novachek or Keith Byers if you want but it's his skill set that made him unique. Receivers are a dime a dozen, yet a receiver who blocks like Hines Ward or Edelmen is handy.  Bolden is another option at FB if he shows the blocking capability.

     




    A player who combines good blocking and good pass catching ability is certainly valuable.  I wouldn't go so far, though, as saying receivers (good ones at least) are a dime a dozen.  Receivers who can create separation and force double teams are not that common... and they are every bit as valuable as blockers.  (In fact a double team can take defenders out of the way of the running back just as effectively as a block can.) Just because we were too one-dimensional with passing last year doesn't mean we should now become one-dimensional with the run.  It's possible to have an offense that's diverse enough to do more than one thing.

     

     

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from wozzy. Show wozzy's posts

    Re: Has the era of the fullback ended before it really began?

    Kevin Turner, Gash, Keith Byars, Marc Edwards, Larry Centers, Patrick Pass... we have a long history of fullbacks who were heavily and successfully involved in the pass game.  Hernandez may be more talented then any of them, but he is not necessarily revolutionary.

    It wasn't until Heath Evans left that we cut the fullback designation off the depth chart (when Obie took over not surprisingly), but 2007's offensive explosion and 2008's powerful run game started with a lot of solid blocks by Evans and Eckels, which opened up the deep bombs to Moss and Stallworth.

    I don't care what they call the fullback, as long as they keep up the power running I'm happy, when the pass game catches up to the early success of the run game, we'll become impossible to stop because our Defense is nasty.

     
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