how much to sign DMC?

  1. This post has been removed.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from NoMorePensionLooting. Show NoMorePensionLooting's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    DMC needs to go back to CB and get his mojo back.

    He is an "OK" FS and the Pats should not be over paying for a reclamation project.

    The Patriots middle has been softer than my aging gut and if they are going to fix what needs to be fixed the FS and SS is a good place to start.

     
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  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ATJ. Show ATJ's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    I like DMC as a FS.  Our need is at SS. 

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from NoMorePensionLooting. Show NoMorePensionLooting's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    For the money that some are saying we should give DMC, a poor tackler, the Pats could pay someone like Byrd at the ~6 mil range.

    I would hope the Pats don't give DMC BYRD money as at that point Byrd is ahead of DMC.

    It's up to the Pats really, they can stick with light hitting, poor tackling safeties or upgrade to hitters.

     

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from 49Patriots. Show 49Patriots's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    Won't cost a lot 

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?


    DMC was the highest rated safety(both positions) by profootballfocus.com. He lead the NFL in passes defensed for a safety. He was the only memeber of the PFF pro bowl team from the Patriots this season.

    He has amazing range for his frame, and what fans here dont/wont understand is that the position the coaches put him in often limit his play making ability(in terms of ints etc.,) It is actually a small problem I have with the defensive coaching philosophy.  Always preventing the big play by keeping your safeties so deep and watching good QB's just own the field underneath, which we see has killed us in our playoff losses. 

    Lock up Mccourty now, restructure VW, cut Gregory, Wilson, Wilson, soap, and draft another DT, safety, TE and a center. Sign Blount to a team friendly deal, and tell Talib to enjoy the rest of his career. finally if we have money left to sign Edelman.....give it to Erick Decker. 

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from cellucci. Show cellucci's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    dmc is a below average safety

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from joepatsfan111111. Show joepatsfan111111's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?


    Not alot i wouldnt think. 5/25? sounds good. maybe 5/30? he would be MUCH better if he could play a more free lance FS and not play SS. he could be more of a playmaker at an actual FS spot.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from mthurl. Show mthurl's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    I really think we should watch this guy play for another year before we give him a new deal. I could care less how profootballfocus has him rated, they were the same people telling me Merriweather was the third best safety in the entire AFC.

    I'm not saying he is a failure, but I'm not saying he is as good as some website is saying either. I just want to wait with this guy.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from joepatsfan111111. Show joepatsfan111111's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    In response to mthurl's comment:

    I really think we should watch this guy play for another year before we give him a new deal. I could care less how profootballfocus has him rated, they were the same people telling me Merriweather was the third best safety in the entire AFC.

    I'm not saying he is a failure, but I'm not saying he is as good as some website is saying either. I just want to wait with this guy.



    everyone seems to worship these rankings which i think tells maybe half the story. dont like those ranks at all

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from APpats22. Show APpats22's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    In response to ATJ's comment:

    I like DMC as a FS.  Our need is at SS. 



    I agree with this. Bring the safeties in closer, get a true SS who can knock someone out, and let DMC freelance a bit more. He would be amazing if given the opportunity.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from BabeParilli. Show BabeParilli's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    Ahhhh, if DMC doesn't come at a steep discount, let some other sucker pay for him.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsEng. Show PatsEng's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    In response to mthurl's comment:

    I really think we should watch this guy play for another year before we give him a new deal. I could care less how profootballfocus has him rated, they were the same people telling me Merriweather was the third best safety in the entire AFC.

    I'm not saying he is a failure, but I'm not saying he is as good as some website is saying either. I just want to wait with this guy.



    Watching the guy, when he's not covering for the SS or for CB's who can't cover past the box. When Talib was 100% and McCourty didn't have to worry about both sides of the field and the box to make up for Gregory he was a great FS. The problem is we are asking him to cover 3 positions and 2 are on opposite sides of the field. Get a SS that can actually cover worth a darn and a reliable CB that McCourty doesn't ned to worry about covering both sides of the field and he's as good as any other FS out ther.

    Luckily FS's cost less then CB's. $4-6mil  average per year 1/3-1/2 guaranteed on a 4-5 year deal should get it done.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from mthurl. Show mthurl's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    In response to PatsEng's comment:

    In response to mthurl's comment:

    I really think we should watch this guy play for another year before we give him a new deal. I could care less how profootballfocus has him rated, they were the same people telling me Merriweather was the third best safety in the entire AFC.

    I'm not saying he is a failure, but I'm not saying he is as good as some website is saying either. I just want to wait with this guy.



    Watching the guy, when he's not covering for the SS or for CB's who can't cover past the box. When Talib was 100% and McCourty didn't have to worry about both sides of the field and the box to make up for Gregory he was a great FS. The problem is we are asking him to cover 3 positions and 2 are on opposite sides of the field. Get a SS that can actually cover worth a darn and a reliable CB that McCourty doesn't ned to worry about covering both sides of the field and he's as good as any other FS out ther.

    Luckily FS's cost less then CB's. $4-6mil  average per year 1/3-1/2 guaranteed on a 4-5 year deal should get it done.




    Ok. I'm not saying the guy is chopped liver, I just want to see more, but you bring up some good points.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from phatcatvirginbuttbuster45. Show phatcatvirginbuttbuster45's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    In response to PhatVirgin's comment:

    In response to APpats22's comment:

    In response to ATJ's comment:

    I like DMC as a FS.  Our need is at SS. 



    I agree with this. Bring the safeties in closer, get a true SS who can knock someone out, and let DMC freelance a bit more. He would be amazing if given the opportunity.



    all is for naught if we can't keep players around due to $$

    Talib, Edelman, Spikes, DMC....

    If the Patriots don't re-sign Talib, it ain't gonna matter where DMC plays.




     

    BUST-CHISEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Did you think I wouldn't do my job for this board and let them know you are the one and only BUST-CHISE, the world’s biggest and most ridiculous NY Jets Troll? That you hunt for the backsides of your neighbors kitties at night? That you carry an old rag, a torn up Mark Sanchez Jets T-Shirt, and a bottle of chloroform which you use to incapacitate your young feline victims and that it's the reason you call this BUST-CHISE persona "Phat Virgin"?

    You will be known whenever you come here….this I swear to this board….the NY Jets are the worst franchise in the history of the NFL…44 years of laughable failure and ridicule, like Kellen “Vaseline Jazz Hands” Winslow….RUB-A-DUB-DUB, BUST-CHISE, RUB -A--DUB-DUB

    BWAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!

     

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from phatcatvirginbuttbuster45. Show phatcatvirginbuttbuster45's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    In response to rkarp's comment:

    As of now, the Patriots have seven safeties (Devin McCourty, Steve Gregory, Adrian Wilson, Tavon Wilson, Duron Harmon, Nate Ebner, and Kanorris Davis) signed for the 2014 season. Their respective cap numbers are $5,115,000, $3,533,334, $1,833,333, $1,150,335, $633,900, $594,150, and $495,000.

    When he signed his rookie deal Devin McCourty’s 2014 salary was scheduled to be $870,000 but with a possible $3.2 million escalator for the 2014 season. Devin has done enough to increase his 2014 salary by $3,050,000 to $3,920,000. It is time for the Patriots and Devin to reach an extension. Let’s look at some comparables. Jarius Byrd is 10 months older than McCourty and played under the franchise tag ($6.916 million) in 2013. Devin McCourty who will be 27 when the 2014 starts was on the All-Pro 2nd team. Earl Thomas was also drafted in 2010 and was first team All-Pro. Like McCourty Earl Thomas is signed through the 2014 season. It could be that the Patriots, Bills and Seahawks are waiting to see who signs their safety first. Earl Thomas is a year and 9 months younger than McCourty. Eric Weddle, a fellow member of the All Pro 2nd team, signed his current 5 year $40 million deal in 2011. Kam Chancellor, yet another member of the All Pro 2nd team, signed a four-year, $28 million extension in April, 2013. Antrell Rolle, one more member of the All-Pro 2nd team, signed a five year, $37 million deal with the Giants in 2010 when he was 27. Dashon Goldson signed his 5-year, $41.5 million deal in March, 2013. William Moore signed his 5-year, $30 million deal in March, 2013. Michael Griffin signed his 5-year, $35 million deal in June of 2012. The franchise tag for safeties is projected to be right around 8 million dollars. It is likely that it will be more than that in 2015 when McCourty is scheduled to be an unrestricted free agent. Therefore, if franchised by the Pats in 2015 McCourty would receive over $12 million in cash in a two-year period. If franchised again in 2016, McCourty would receive close to $22 million over 3 years. Therefore, it seems reasonable to venture that a McCourty extension in the $6 to $7 million per year average range would be fair for both sides. A 7 million average per deal would tie Michael Griffin for the 8 highest APY for a safety. An extension could lower McCourty’s 2014 cap number by one to two million dollars. Here’s one such an example of how:

    Extend McCourty through the 2018 season.
    Give him a $10 million signing bonus which would be prorated over 5 years (2014/2015/2016/2017/2018)
    Lower his salary to $730,000.
    which would lower his cap number from $5,115,000 to $3,925,000 for a savings of $1,190,000.

    Current cap number of $5,115,000 consists of:
    $3,920,000 salary
    $1,145,000 signing bonus proration
    $50,000 offseason workout bonus money

    Proposed 2014 cap number of $3,925,000 consists of:
    $730,000 salary
    $3,145,000 signing bonus proration
    $50,000 offseason workout bonus money

    Proposed 2015 cap number of $7,000,000 consists of:
    $5,000,000 salary
    $2,000,000 signing bonus proration

    Proposed 2016 cap number of $7,000,000 consists of:
    $5,000,000 salary
    $2,000,000 signing bonus proration

    Proposed 2017 cap number of $7,000,000 consists of:
    $5,000,000 salary
    $2,000,000 signing bonus proration

    Proposed 2018 cap number of $7,000,000 consists of:
    $5,000,000 salary
    $2,000,000 signing bonus proration

    If the Pats decide that they need the cap space I see them releasing Steve Gregory early in the 2014 League Year as it would free up $2.23 million in cap space. Because he played in over 70% of the defensive snaps in 2013, Steve Gregory now has a $375,000 playing-time incentive which I project to be LTBE, that is, counts against the 2014 cap. His current cap number of $3,558,334 consists of:
    $2,250,000 salary
    $833,334 signing bonus proration
    $375,000 playing-time incentive
    $100,000 offseason workout bonus money

    Like Gregory, I see Adrian Wilson’s spot on the Patriots dependent on how much space the Pats need to sign/extend their players like Talib, Edelman, and Blount. The more cap space spent on that trio significantly increases the likelihood that the older and expensive veterans like Gregory, Tommy Kelly, and Adrian Wilson are all let go.

    Tavon Wilson, whose percentage of defensive snaps played went from 43% in 2012 to 1% in 2013, is in danger of losing his roster spot to a rookie or first-year player earning a $420,000 salary. If Tavon is waived after June 1, the Pats would create over $350,000 in cap space.

    As part of the new CBA there is a proven performance escalator for draft picks chosen in Round 3 through 7. Duron Harmon is eligible for it in 2016 . An eligible player will qualify for the Proven Performance Escalator in his fourth League Year if: (1) he participated in a minimum of 35% of his Club’s offensive or defensive plays in any two of his previous three regular seasons; or (2) he participated in a “cumulative average” of at least 35% of his Club’s offensive or defensive plays over his previous three regular seasons. Harmon played in 37% of the defensive snaps in 2013.

     




    So...what internet article did you lift this crud from Krapper?

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from TripleOG. Show TripleOG's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?


    If we pay McCourty 8 mill a year, I would be dissapointed. We had Rodney Harrison, granted not in his prime, but we paid him an extension of 2.4 mill a year with 2.5 garunteed bonus after dominating two playoff runs and helping us Win TWO SBs!

    Now I know the market has changed and players are getting more but all the guys mentioned that have gotten big contracts are better than McCourty IMO. I like the guy but outside of keeping TDs off the board deep, he really doesnt do anything good.

    He cant cover Tight ends. His tackling has gotten worse every year since rookie year when he was thumping people at the CB position(shoulder injuries). He is always gonna have problems with shoulder trying to play safety or he will just be a bad tackler like we saw last year. He doesnt make enough impact plays for me.

    If we are gonna spend, why not get a real playmaker?(how many pics he drop this year?) You mean to tell me a guy that plays the back end in cover 2 is worth 8 million??? Naaaa, not even close. Call me a troll if you want but this is a mistake. We didnt even offer Eugene Wilson a contract who was a better enforcer/hitter and equally smart just not as much range. This is a mistake. Its gonna handicap the secondary. Pay Talib who is much more valuable to us..   Draft any dam FS to just play cover 2 or promote Harmon. I got news for you guys. Harmon was drafted to replace McCourty. Either McCourty loves the pats and gives us a discount or look for him to resurface in Houston same way Eugene did. Makes perfect sense for them. Ed Reed didnt work. Let someone else overpay

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from cellucci. Show cellucci's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    re-sign dmc and trade him for his brother

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from TripleOG. Show TripleOG's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    In response to cellucci's comment:

    re-sign dmc and trade him for his brother




    Yes his bro seems to have a bright future as a CB. He was paid a nice contract last offseason. Funny thing is upon entering the league as a much higher pick and after watching Devins rookie year I was thinking, "what happened to Jason" then a year later, McCourty was berng abused and Jason was the man. Funny how careers can change once you get here. I think Jason is more agile and benefits from a better scheme in Tennessee that allows him to play agressive. McCourty was pretty good but didnt get a good jam and started getting beat at the line.  

     
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    Re: how much to sign DMC?

     

    BUST-CHISEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Did you think I wouldn't do my job for this board and let them know you are the one and only BUST-CHISE, the world’s biggest and most ridiculous NY Jets Troll? That you hunt for the backsides of your neighbors kitties at night? That you carry an old rag, a torn up Mark Sanchez Jets T-Shirt, and a bottle of chloroform which you use to incapacitate your young feline victims and that it's the reason you call this BUST-CHISE persona "Phat Virgin"?

    And how about all your other names BUST-CHISE ?

    Among them are:

    Bustify

    Uncle Rico

    Manning Rules

    Meadowland Mike

    Mile High Mike

    Bungalo Bill

    Wewerrdat

    Fletcherbrook

    Footballexpert45

    You will be known whenever you come here….this I swear to this board….the NY Jets are the worst franchise in the history of the NFL…44 years of laughable failure and ridicule, like Kellen “Vaseline Jazz Hands” Winslow….RUB-A-DUB-DUB, BUST-CHISE, RUB -A--DUB-DUB

    BWAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!

     
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  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    In response to joepatsfan111111's comment:

    In response to mthurl's comment:

    I really think we should watch this guy play for another year before we give him a new deal. I could care less how profootballfocus has him rated, they were the same people telling me Merriweather was the third best safety in the entire AFC.

    I'm not saying he is a failure, but I'm not saying he is as good as some website is saying either. I just want to wait with this guy.



    everyone seems to worship these rankings which i think tells maybe half the story. dont like those ranks at all



    I used to say the same thing until I understood their system and how they achieve the rankings. 

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from joepatsfan111111. Show joepatsfan111111's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:



    I used to say the same thing until I understood their system and how they achieve the rankings. 



    well, explan it to me please, how do they work?

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: how much to sign DMC?

    In response to joepatsfan111111's comment:

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:



    I used to say the same thing until I understood their system and how they achieve the rankings. 



    well, explan it to me please, how do they work?



    Gladly,

    Grading

    .
    1) Why do we grade?

    The goal of our detailed grading process is to gauge how players execute their roles over the course of a game by looking at the performance of each individual on each play. We look beyond the stat sheet at game footage to try to gain an understanding of how well a lineman is blocking on a given play, how much space and help a runner is being given on a play, how effectively a pass rusher brings pressure or how well a defender covers a receiver.
    .
    We collect lots of extra statistics such as yards after catch, yards after contact, missed tackles, dropped passes etc., but our real focus is on grading individual performance on each play. Did an offensive lineman seal his block to spring the runner through a hole? Did a defensive lineman beat his block to force a runner to change the play direction in the backfield? Was the crucial third-down completion due to the quarterback beating the coverage or a breakdown in coverage?
    .
    We examine not just the statistical result of a play, but the context of that statistic. The defensive tackle may have made a tackle on a play, but if it was 3rd-and-5 and he got blown 4 yards off of the ball to make the tackle after a 6-yard gain, that’s not a good play.
    .
    This allows us to present a unique set of statistics for individual player performance in each game. We present base statistics alongside more advanced statistics together with a grade for every player. The marks are presented as overall composite grades but are also broken down in a number of key areas:.

    Offense
    • Running
    • Passing and receiving
    • Pass protection
    • Run blocking
    • Screen blocking

    Defense
    • Run defense
    • Pass rushing
    • Pass coverage
    .

    .

    2) What Do We Grade?

    Throughout the course of the season (regular season and playoffs) we grade every single offensive, defensive and special teams snap. We log data such as the point of attack of a running play, the location a pass was thrown and hang time of kicks and punts before moving on to the player-performance analysis.
    .
    A typical line of analysis will describe an offensive and defensive player being graded for a one-on-one confrontation. This will include their names and grades as well as a comment describing the play. So for example, a match-up between a right guard and left defensive tackle could result in the following comment:
    .
    The RG drove the DLT down the line of scrimmage opening a wide hole off his outside hip for the running back (##) to pick up the first down on 3rd & 3.”
    .
    This type of notation serves a few purposes. First, it captures detail for grading, a concise comment that can be referenced back to individual players for further analysis at a later date.Also, due to each play having a unique ID, it also creates a clear and accessible audit trail for all analysis.
    .  
    .

    3) How Do We Grade?

    Each grade given is between +2 and -2, with 0.5 increments and an average of 0. A positive intervention in the game rates a positive grading and vice-versa. Very (very) few performances draw a +/-2 rating. In fact, the distribution of non-zero grades is like this:
    .

    +2.0 0.01percent +1.5 0.3percent +1.0 16percent +0.5 37percent (unbalanced because of the way WRs and HBs are rated) -0.5 24percent -1.0 22percent -1.5 0.5percent -2.0 0.01percent

    .

    The grading takes into account many things and effectively brings “intelligence” to raw statistics.
    .
    For example, a raw stat might tell you a tackle conceded a sack. However, how long did he protect the QB for before he gave it up? Additionally, when did he give it up? If it was within the last two minutes on a potentially game-tying drive, it may be rather more important than when his team is running out the clock in a 30-point blowout.
    .
    The average grade, or what we would typically expect of the average player, is therefore defined as zero. In reality, the vast majority of grades on each individual play are zero and what we are grading are the exceptions to this.
    .
    A seal block on the backside of a play, for example, is something that it is reasonable to expect to be completed successfully. Consequently, it receives a zero grade, whereas the differentiation between a good and poor block is a heavy downgrade for a failed seal block to the backside of a running play.
    .
    .

    4) The “Rules” of Grading

    Because of the nature of the roles, each position is graded in a slightly different way and the definitions for each run on for many pages. Although we’re not going to publish our 30+ page document on how we do this, not least because that’s our IP, below are a few of the key principles in our grading methodology:
    .

    • DON’T GUESS — If you’re not 95 percent sure what’s gone on then don’t grade the player for that play. The grades must stand up to scrutiny and criticism, and it’s far better to say you’re not sure than be wrong.

    It is, however, crucial that this is not seen as an excuse to shy away from making a judgement. What we definitely do not do is raise or lower the grading because we’re not sure. Giving a grade of -0.5 rather than -1.5 for a player on an individual play because you’re unsure is the wrong grade to give. If the grader is 95 percent sure of the severe fault on the play, the grade is -1.5. If, however, the grader is unsure of his judgment, the correct grade is 0.
    .
    • WE ARE NOT SCOUTS — We aren’t looking for (or grading) style or technique, merely the result of the play. We aren’t looking for promise and potential that can be coached up. We aren’t looking for things like “heavy-legged waist benders” on the O-line. We aren’t looking for DBs with “stiff hips.”

    We are looking for the result of that poor technique, not the poor technique itself. If poor technique results in a positive play, that is graded at the same level as good technique yielding a positive play. Did the lineman make the block he attempted, by whatever means?

    This is professional football, and our biggest assumption (one that we feel, and have been informed, is a very safe assumption) is that the player at least attempted to complete his assignment on an individual play. This removes a large degree of the doubt surrounding us not having access to playbooks and play calls. We are grading what happened, and it is safe to assume that in the vast majority of cases the assignments carried out were the assignments called on that play.
    .
    • YOU DO NOT HAVE TO APPORTION BLAME ON EVERY PLAY — On each play there is often a “winner.” One unit, be it the offense or the defense, will usually get the better of a play by varying degrees. This, however, does not entail that one or more individuals on the losing unit are to blame.

    For example, if an offense is stopped on 3rd-and-3 on a running play for 2 yards, that would constitute a failure for the offensive unit. But each member of the offense may very well have carried out his assignment properly.

    Say the defense sets up overloaded against the run. Every defender except one is successfully blocked. A lone, unblocked defender makes a strong tackle to stop the back short of the marker.

    In that instance, no one individual is at fault for the play failing. The defense simply had the right play called. Sometimes plays are designed badly, sometimes coaches don’t adjust. This site is looking at individual player performance, not that of coaches and not necessarily how individual player performance correlates with team performance.
    .
    • GREAT PLAYERS SCREW UP TOO — Blame is apportioned according to who is at fault on the play, not according to seniority. If a veteran QB clearly overthrows a rookie WR, it is not assumed the rookie got something wrong (as some commentators and journalists assume while watching the game live).

    We treat players as a number rather than a name and the reputation attached to that name. We treat Ray Lewis as Baltimore No. 52 and see what grade he comes out with at the end for the individual performances in that game.
    .
    • ZERO (0.0) IS THE AVERAGE GRADE — If a player does something you would normally expect, then this scores a 0. If a linebacker makes an unblocked tackle 5 yards downfield or a tight end makes a wide-open catch for an 8-yard gain, they receive a score of 0 for that play.

    Grades are given for plays which are reasonably considered to be better or worse than the average or expected play. So for example, if the linebacker were to then force a fumble on that tackle, that would constitute a positive play and a positive grade. If the tight end were to in fact drop the wide-open pass, that would constitute a negative play and a negative grade.
    .
    .

    5) Normalization and What the Grades Mean

    Once we’ve got the raw grades we could leave it there, but this would lead to a number of problems.
    .
    For example, because an offensive lineman can only be negatively graded in pass protection, the perfect score in the raw data is 0. However, what if a lineman plays half the number of passing plays of another guy and they both score 0? What allows you to understand the second has done the better job? This is where Player Participation comes in: To fully understand how a player has performed, we need to know how many plays he’s participated in and what role he performed.
    .
    So when we look at, say, a TE, we need to know how many plays he spent out in pass routes, how many times he blocked for the run and how many times he stayed in to block for the pass. To this number we then apply a normalization factor to set the AVERAGE player in that facet of the game to 0.
    .
    If, however, you look at the “By Position” tab, you will notice that not all of the averages are 0 for every season. This is because we applied the average of 0 to our first season and have retained those “normalization factors” throughout the subsequent seasons to allow a comparison of how the average performance has shifted over seasons. This demonstrates how the standard of play in the league changes through time.
    .
    Normalization gives the grades their full setting as a performance indicator for an individual over his full body of work on a per-game, per-season and per-play basis.
    .
    .

    6) What is Player Participation?

    Once we realized we needed to normalize the data, we wanted that normalization to be as accurate as possible. The only way to do that was to determine how many times each player was on the field doing a particular role.
    .
    Unfortunately, we found at a pretty early stage that due to the way the networks cover special teams plays, we could only include offensive and defensive plays. However, that aside, what it gave us (and, we hope, you as well) was a much more complete insight into how various players were used, in what packages and in what situations. We therefore can also provide breakdowns of where each player played on each play and the role he performed (blitzing, blocking, coverage etc.).
    .
    .

    7) How subjective is the Grading?

    Many people say that as soon as you start grading, you bring subjectivity into your work. Obviously, to some degree, that’s true.
    .
    However, there’s also subjectivity around whether a play was a QB run for negative yardage or a sack, if an assist on a tackle should be awarded and if a catch was dropped or not. Sure, you can come up with a set of rules to determine which is which, but in the end, at the borderline between one and the other, it’s always subjective. It comes down to a judgment call.
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    The real trick of grading is to define a clear set of rules, encompassing each type of play. If your rules are thorough and precise enough, the answers just fall out. It becomes as easy as determining the dropped pass that hit the TE right between the numbers.
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    Just like with the more mainstream statistics, there are occasions when the choice is difficult. But the difference on our site is this: If a guy is going to be upgraded or downgraded on a judgment call, we let it ride. We simply make the comment and then put in a 0.
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    Statistics in their raw form are considered objective. But in our opinion, with the small number of NFL games played each season, raw stats are very often unintelligent. If a QB throws three interceptions in a game but one came from a dropped pass, another from a WR running a poor route and a third on a Hail Mary at the end of the half, it skews his stats by far too great an amount to be useful.  Our “subjective” grading allows us to bring some intelligence to the raw numbers.
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    8 ) How accurate are the Statistics and Grading?

    Our player participation data has been confirmed as being 99 percent accurate, and we firmly believe that we are more than 90 percent accurate in our grading of individual plays. We’ve been commended by NFL players for the accuracy of our grading and told we are “light years” ahead of anything available elsewhere in media circles.
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    Although we are more than happy with the accuracy (and the constant improvement in accuracy) of the individual areas of our grades, the final “overall” grade is one that is cause for much discussion among NFL fans and the PFF staff as well.
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    For example, we’re happy with how the pass-blocking and run-blocking grades are constructed for offensive linemen, the balance those two skills are given to create an overall grade will vary from fan to fan, coach to coach and scheme to scheme. This is an area we are hoping to improve in the future, allowing fans to input their own weightings at the “By Position” page. This would provide the option to come up with their own overall grading depending upon how they view the different skills that make up an individual position.
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    9) I Think Some of Your Grading is Wrong. What Do I Do?

    We are always keen to hear constructive criticism of our gradings — if you’d like to get hold of us directly you can either go to the “Contact Us” section, leave a comment in articles or, better still, open a question in our forum. We would love to hear from anyone who has done a separate play-by-play analysis on player performance to compare notes and findings.
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