Josh Gordon

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Josh Gordon

     


    Yes, I know he is not playing for the home team...


    he is a classic case of a cross roads for the NFL however...here is a clear cut case of a kid who has a pot problem, and an alcohol issue. to date, he has hurt himself, but no one else.


    the NFL most likely will suspend him for the year. we hear about the Brown "moving on" (same with the Jags and Blackmon)


    I think the NFL needs to step up and not let teams "move on" from these kids with substance abuse issues...how about HELPING THEM, rather than "moving on"??


    suspend him for a year, and the kid will immediately go down the toilet. How about suspend him for the year AND have him at the facility every day, at practice everyday and in treatment EVERYDAY...keep some structure in his life, get him help, and maybe he does not turn into a lost cause.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from WazzuWheatfarmer. Show WazzuWheatfarmer's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    Good thoughts.  I like the idea of keeping structure in the lives of these guys.  Definitely suspend him for the entire season, though.  I don't have any sympathy for anyone who chooses to take the wheel after drinking.  I don't care if it was "just a couple beers."

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Pats-bilbo. Show Pats-bilbo's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    I would add the following: before he returns to daily structure around the team, He needs to go into a treatment center for 45 days or more and get professional help. They need to cut his salary to almost nothing so he realizes what life will be like without NFL. 

    At the end of the day, none of this may help him. He has to help himself and want to change.

    --- " I am a happy fan, a proud fan and I want us to win every game 28-0 but as long as we win, the team is united and has a sense of respect to the community and the game I will be a patriots fan and damn proud of it." ---- signed a pats fan from middle earth

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Kinchow. Show Kinchow's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    Why wouldn't every NFL team provide each player a personal chauffeur?  (Heck, every celebrity should think about this) 

    That would eliminate the prospect of DUI related issues.  


     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from joepatsfan111111. Show joepatsfan111111's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    Exactly. Said this in the other thread, the NFL lets these gangsters and wife beaters run wild but try their hardest to rid themselves of alcoholics and potheads who harm themselves 

    its amazing. 

    Obviously a DWI is more serious, but before that, Gordon was facing up to a year for two failed drug tests.... Amazing. And Rice may get 6 games.... 

     

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from dfitzp. Show dfitzp's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    The window in professional sports is just a small period in a persons life. All these guys need to do is stay out of trouble and take care of themselves for 10 or 12 years. They are then set for life financially. These guys can't do that. They lack the maturity and discipline to do the right thing. They usually end up in jail or broke soon after the last paycheck. Vince Young was spending $5,000 per week at the Cheesecake Factory. Pacman Jones had to have security posted outside his room to keep him from acting up. Many others are spending tens of thousands of dollars on strippers, and child support payments. Some have a dozen kids by 10 different women. These idiots should be ashamed of themselves. Instead they are worshiped by their entourage. I feel bad for guys that bust their as$ and keep getting cut. They would do anything to trade places with these morons.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from ewhite1065. Show ewhite1065's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    They should just legalize weed and up the DWI alcohol level to .12. If they did that this guy wouldn't have a problem and everyone could just treat him like a normal person.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from OnlyDaTruth. Show OnlyDaTruth's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    Why should the team be responsible for cleaning him up? Gordon is a grown man who has chosen to wear little boy pants. He reaps what he sows and is accountable for his own choices.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from NYC. Show NYC's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    In response to rkarp's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

     

    Yes, I know he is not playing for the home team...

    he is a classic case of a cross roads for the NFL however...here is a clear cut case of a kid who has a pot problem, and an alcohol issue. to date, he has hurt himself, but no one else.

    the NFL most likely will suspend him for the year. we hear about the Brown "moving on" (same with the Jags and Blackmon)

    I think the NFL needs to step up and not let teams "move on" from these kids with substance abuse issues...how about HELPING THEM, rather than "moving on"??

    suspend him for a year, and the kid will immediately go down the toilet. How about suspend him for the year AND have him at the facility every day, at practice everyday and in treatment EVERYDAY...keep some structure in his life, get him help, and maybe he does not turn into a lost cause.

    [/QUOTE]

    KARP

    This is one of the most constructive posts you have contributed to date. I strongly agree these guys need structure and treatment in a non-punitive environment for non criminal drug related offenses.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from Muzwell. Show Muzwell's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    I agree to a point, he shouldn't be banned for life. If there's a team that wants to take a chance on him down the road, he should be able to play again if he gets straight. But I believe the NFL makes resources available for players dealing with personal issues. If he chooses to take advantage of those things, or he doesn't, that's on him.

    The Browns are his employer, not his family. If you or I continually screw up and fail drug tests, get arrested, etc., is it our employer's responsibility to help us? No, it's not. They might want to for business reasons, but they're obligation ends at the office door. 

    At some point, he needs to grow up, be a man, cut the crap.  How about this for starters, stop putting drugs and alcohol in your body, see if that helps?

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from NOISE. Show NOISE's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    In response to rkarp's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

     

    Yes, I know he is not playing for the home team...

     

    he is a classic case of a cross roads for the NFL however...here is a clear cut case of a kid who has a pot problem, and an alcohol issue. to date, he has hurt himself, but no one else.

     

    the NFL most likely will suspend him for the year. we hear about the Brown "moving on" (same with the Jags and Blackmon)

     

    I think the NFL needs to step up and not let teams "move on" from these kids with substance abuse issues...how about HELPING THEM, rather than "moving on"??

     

    suspend him for a year, and the kid will immediately go down the toilet. How about suspend him for the year AND have him at the facility every day, at practice everyday and in treatment EVERYDAY...keep some structure in his life, get him help, and maybe he does not turn into a lost cause.

    [/QUOTE]

    All good thoughts rkarp, but NFL is trying to figure out how they can go sneak in a 4th day of the nfl draft to make even more money OR how they can possibly squeeze any more money in un-tapped areas.  This is nfl priority, not the good points you make,.,,,,unfortunately 

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Philskiw1. Show Philskiw1's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    So if its the teams responsibility to help them then they should start by filtering their money to them. Give it to them on a graduated schedule so their not dumping millions in a 23 year old kids pocket. Money can make a person feel invincible. If they got it over a period of time them some of them might not be broke at 30. 

     

     

    Now you got the easy part done telling me about it.

    Does that handshaped bruise on your back hurt?

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from seawolfxs. Show seawolfxs's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon


    I think it begins with the CBA ?


    players get so much , teams get so much


    even with that the players are suing for more. While not all deserve it, and not all the injuries are from the nfl 


    how about the agents? They get a little much in my opinion


    players have a problem coz too many will be broke 5 yrs out of the league 


    When a player making 500k , buys a diamond  earring for 50k and then loses it on the field, it is just anecdotal evidence that too many of these kids cannot handle the total package. Too many have gun problems, kids out of wedlock , drug problems and then money problems, Too many pampered their whole life


    I don't see the nfl owners having much control to have an impact on these problems. . they do have a rookie prep session, they do have players talk with them. But by 21 the responsibility is theirs.


    the idea of a structured environment is sound. maybe some non playing reserve list has Merritt, but in the end I don't see a lot of success. 


    Btw Gordon was in a structured environment, did seem to do much good did it.?


    one never knows when the lites start to go on, C Carter was one, but he admits it was getting cut from the eagles. 


    Why more pro players don't get drivers when they go out,is something that always puzzles me.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    In response to Muzwell's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I agree to a point, he shouldn't be banned for life. If there's a team that wants to take a chance on him down the road, he should be able to play again if he gets straight. But I believe the NFL makes resources available for players dealing with personal issues. If he chooses to take advantage of those things, or he doesn't, that's on him.

    The Browns are his employer, not his family. If you or I continually screw up and fail drug tests, get arrested, etc., is it our employer's responsibility to help us? No, it's not. They might want to for business reasons, but they're obligation ends at the office door. 

    At some point, he needs to grow up, be a man, cut the crap.  How about this for starters, stop putting drugs and alcohol in your body, see if that helps?

    [/QUOTE]

    Prior to selling my business, yes, we did help our employees with these issues. Rehab, out patient counseling and substance abuse treatment were all part of our insurance package as well as my personal involvement in getting our people the help they needed.

    my company was not alone in this....most companies offer this help

    Gordon, Blackmon and many, many other players are kids with problems and need help. Players association and the NFL should get together on this situation immediately. Helps the kids, makes the league look good. 

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    In response to seawolfxs' comment:
    [QUOTE]


    I think it begins with the CBA ?

     

    players get so much , teams get so much

     

    even with that the players are suing for more. While not all deserve it, and not all the injuries are from the nfl 

     

    how about the agents? They get a little much in my opinion

     

    players have a problem coz too many will be broke 5 yrs out of the league 

     

    When a player making 500k , buys a diamond  earring for 50k and then loses it on the field, it is just anecdotal evidence that too many of these kids cannot handle the total package. Too many have gun problems, kids out of wedlock , drug problems and then money problems, Too many pampered their whole life

     

    I don't see the nfl owners having much control to have an impact on these problems. . they do have a rookie prep session, they do have players talk with them. But by 21 the responsibility is theirs.

     

    the idea of a structured environment is sound. maybe some non playing reserve list has Merritt, but in the end I don't see a lot of success. 

     

    Btw Gordon was in a structured environment, did seem to do much good did it.?

     

    one never knows when the lites start to go on, C Carter was one, but he admits it was getting cut from the eagles. 

     

    Why more pro players don't get drivers when they go out,is something that always puzzles me.

    [/QUOTE]

    This latest DWI happened while the players were on summer break and he was away from team structure.

    I do not have the timeline of when he was tested and failed his drug test for marijuana

     

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from OnlyDaTruth. Show OnlyDaTruth's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    In response to rkarp's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to seawolfxs' comment:
    [QUOTE]


    I think it begins with the CBA ?

     

    players get so much , teams get so much

     

    even with that the players are suing for more. While not all deserve it, and not all the injuries are from the nfl 

     

    how about the agents? They get a little much in my opinion

     

    players have a problem coz too many will be broke 5 yrs out of the league 

     

    When a player making 500k , buys a diamond  earring for 50k and then loses it on the field, it is just anecdotal evidence that too many of these kids cannot handle the total package. Too many have gun problems, kids out of wedlock , drug problems and then money problems, Too many pampered their whole life

     

    I don't see the nfl owners having much control to have an impact on these problems. . they do have a rookie prep session, they do have players talk with them. But by 21 the responsibility is theirs.

     

    the idea of a structured environment is sound. maybe some non playing reserve list has Merritt, but in the end I don't see a lot of success. 

     

    Btw Gordon was in a structured environment, did seem to do much good did it.?

     

    one never knows when the lites start to go on, C Carter was one, but he admits it was getting cut from the eagles. 

     

    Why more pro players don't get drivers when they go out,is something that always puzzles me.

    [/QUOTE]

    This latest DWI happened while the players were on summer break and he was away from team structure.

    I do not have the timeline of when he was tested and failed his drug test for marijuana

     

    [/QUOTE]

    But where is the accountability on Gordon's part?  Who's decision was it to have that drink or smoke.  Is it all of the sudden the team's fault that Gordon failed his drug test? Is Gordon not being compensated well enough for his services?  Can he not afford his own rehab? There's a good chance that a judge my require rehab in lieu of any kind of verdict.  Are you really saying the team should pay for it? 

    The major problem with the team paying for any of Gordon's rehab is that the blame for Gordon's actions and behavior points the finger to everyone else but Gordon.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    In response to OnlyDaTruth's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to rkarp's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to seawolfxs' comment:
    [QUOTE]


    I think it begins with the CBA ?

     

    players get so much , teams get so much

     

    even with that the players are suing for more. While not all deserve it, and not all the injuries are from the nfl 

     

    how about the agents? They get a little much in my opinion

     

    players have a problem coz too many will be broke 5 yrs out of the league 

     

    When a player making 500k , buys a diamond  earring for 50k and then loses it on the field, it is just anecdotal evidence that too many of these kids cannot handle the total package. Too many have gun problems, kids out of wedlock , drug problems and then money problems, Too many pampered their whole life

     

    I don't see the nfl owners having much control to have an impact on these problems. . they do have a rookie prep session, they do have players talk with them. But by 21 the responsibility is theirs.

     

    the idea of a structured environment is sound. maybe some non playing reserve list has Merritt, but in the end I don't see a lot of success. 

     

    Btw Gordon was in a structured environment, did seem to do much good did it.?

     

    one never knows when the lites start to go on, C Carter was one, but he admits it was getting cut from the eagles. 

     

    Why more pro players don't get drivers when they go out,is something that always puzzles me.

    [/QUOTE]

    This latest DWI happened while the players were on summer break and he was away from team structure.

    I do not have the timeline of when he was tested and failed his drug test for marijuana

     

    [/QUOTE]

    But where is the accountability on Gordon's part?  Who's decision was it to have that drink or smoke.  Is it all of the sudden the team's fault that Gordon failed his drug test? Is Gordon not being compensated well enough for his services?  Can he not afford his own rehab? There's a good chance that a judge my require rehab in lieu of any kind of verdict.  Are you really saying the team should pay for it? 

    The major problem with the team paying for any of Gordon's rehab is that the blame for Gordon's actions and behavior points the finger to everyone else but Gordon.

    [/QUOTE]

    When an individual has a disease, taking responsibility and accountability must take a back seat to getting that individual help. 

    No one is placing blame on the team. Simply trying to help a young adult with substance problems. 

    It's pretty obvious, his family was unable to. It is also pretty obvious that VT was unable to or did not attempt to. The NFL may be Gordon's last chance at getting help and over coming this disease

     

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Muzwell. Show Muzwell's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    In response to rkarp's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    [/QUOTE]


    Prior to selling my business, yes, we did help our employees with these issues. Rehab, out patient counseling and substance abuse treatment were all part of our insurance package as well as my personal involvement in getting our people the help they needed.

    my company was not alone in this....most companies offer this help

    Gordon, Blackmon and many, many other players are kids with problems and need help. Players association and the NFL should get together on this situation immediately. Helps the kids, makes the league look good. 

    [/QUOTE]

    I'm pretty certain Gordon has access to all of the counseling in the world. They can't force him to participate.

    He has a choice how this ends up. Some people prefer drugs and booze over being responsible, that's just how it is. As Cris Carter has said, the best thing the Browns can do is release him. Then he has to decide which way his life is going to go. It's on him, nobody else, not the Browns or Roger Goodell or Dee Smith.

    He's not a kid, he's a grown man. Coddling is part of the problem. If he can't quit, he needs to go away. 

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from ghostofjri37. Show ghostofjri37's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    In response to Muzwell's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to rkarp's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    [/QUOTE]

    Prior to selling my business, yes, we did help our employees with these issues. Rehab, out patient counseling and substance abuse treatment were all part of our insurance package as well as my personal involvement in getting our people the help they needed.

    my company was not alone in this....most companies offer this help

    Gordon, Blackmon and many, many other players are kids with problems and need help. Players association and the NFL should get together on this situation immediately. Helps the kids, makes the league look good. 

    [/QUOTE]

    I'm pretty certain Gordon has access to all of the counseling in the world. They can't force him to participate.

    He has a choice how this ends up. Some people prefer drugs and booze over being responsible, that's just how it is. As Cris Carter has said, the best thing the Browns can do is release him. Then he has to decide which way his life is going to go. It's on him, nobody else, not the Browns or Roger Goodell or Dee Smith.

    He's not a kid, he's a grown man. Coddling is part of the problem. If he can't quit, he needs to go away. 

    [/QUOTE]

    This in bold... The help is readily available for him at this point it is about personal accountability.

     

     

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Section136. Show Section136's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    In response to ghostofjri37's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Muzwell's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to rkarp's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    [/QUOTE]

    Prior to selling my business, yes, we did help our employees with these issues. Rehab, out patient counseling and substance abuse treatment were all part of our insurance package as well as my personal involvement in getting our people the help they needed.

    my company was not alone in this....most companies offer this help

    Gordon, Blackmon and many, many other players are kids with problems and need help. Players association and the NFL should get together on this situation immediately. Helps the kids, makes the league look good. 

    [/QUOTE]

    I'm pretty certain Gordon has access to all of the counseling in the world. They can't force him to participate.

    He has a choice how this ends up. Some people prefer drugs and booze over being responsible, that's just how it is. As Cris Carter has said, the best thing the Browns can do is release him. Then he has to decide which way his life is going to go. It's on him, nobody else, not the Browns or Roger Goodell or Dee Smith.

    He's not a kid, he's a grown man. Coddling is part of the problem. If he can't quit, he needs to go away. 

    [/QUOTE]

    This in bold... The help is readily available for him at this point it is about personal accountability.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


    The NFL Substance Abuse Policy offers the players more opportunity to overcome their problems than most employee assistance programs. It begins with a small fine, treatment, counseling and increased monitoring (urine tests) among other things. I've read that we would be blown away by the number of players in this 1st phase of the program. Each subsequent phase becomes more about consequences but still pushes the player to get help. From what I've read these guys get an incredible amount of support before teams "move on". The problem for this thread is the privacy involved in the policy. We are left to guess what is going on, leading to statements like "How can the teams just turn their backs on these player's problems?" or "Why do these teams coddle these guys - kick em loose!"

    Until a person is really ready to admit that a situation is unmanageable for them, there is no chance that they will be sincere in any attempt to correct it. So, ultimately, the players can be directed, encouraged, cajoled, enticed and threatened (which I believe they are - there's too much money on the line) to come to terms with the issue but with no result until they themselves want or need to surrender to the solution. This is no easy proposition for any person, never mind a world class athlete who is used to overcoming adversity through pure will and determination.

    As people judge this situation I would ask them two questions:

    1. If a friend or family member was suffering from a life threatening disease would you advise them to suck it up, grow up and get over it?

    2. If a friend or family member was suffering from a life threatening disease and was not following their treatment guidelines and/or not taking their medicine, would you blame the doctors?

    It's not a simple issue.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from Quagmire3. Show Quagmire3's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    In response to rkarp's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

     

    Yes, I know he is not playing for the home team...

     

    he is a classic case of a cross roads for the NFL however...here is a clear cut case of a kid who has a pot problem, and an alcohol issue. to date, he has hurt himself, but no one else.

     

    the NFL most likely will suspend him for the year. we hear about the Brown "moving on" (same with the Jags and Blackmon)

     

    I think the NFL needs to step up and not let teams "move on" from these kids with substance abuse issues...how about HELPING THEM, rather than "moving on"??

     

    suspend him for a year, and the kid will immediately go down the toilet. How about suspend him for the year AND have him at the facility every day, at practice everyday and in treatment EVERYDAY...keep some structure in his life, get him help, and maybe he does not turn into a lost cause.

    [/QUOTE]

    I get your point but I am a big believer in personal responsibility. 

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    the below info posted by ESPN's Jimmy Walker leads me to believe that the Browns nor the NFL have really helped this kid...

     

    linebacker and former Cleveland Browns team captain D'Qwell Jackson recalls multiple occasions when he tried to help troubled wide receiver Josh Gordon.Jackson and Gordon were teammates for two seasons in 2012 and 2013. As a nine-year veteran, Jackson took it upon himself to counsel Gordon about focusing on football and doing the right things off the field. That is particularly why Gordon's arrest on July 5 for suspected DWI in Raleigh, North Carolina, hit home for Jackson and led to one of the most thoughtful tweets from the NFL community.

     

    Gordon led the NFL with 1,646 receiving yards last season. According to ESPN Stats & Information, it was the 14th time a player had more than 1,600 receiving yards in a season since the NFL merger in 1970 but Gordon was the only one of those players to have three different starting quarterbacks (Jason Campbell, Brandon Weeden, Brian Hoyer) during such a season.

    But this latest arrest now puts his playing career in jeopardy.


     

    "He needs help, he really does," Jackson told ESPN.com. "He needs people to extend themselves and probably have to do more than they wanted to do. But if [the Browns] care anything about the kid, they have to do it."

    Two other people who have worked closely with Gordon told ESPN NFL Insider Ed Werder that he has issues with substance abuse dating back to high school and have urged him to seek professional assistance. Those people also worry that Gordon may be in the process of ruining his career.

    Jackson said he plans to reach out to Gordon again soon. But because Jackson and Gordon are no longer teammates and do not communicate regularly, Jackson said he's not sure Gordon would take his assistance.

     

     

    Jackson thinks it will be up to current Browns teammates and those closer to Gordon to provide proper guidance in a time of need.

    "At this point, calling the cellphone is not going to work," Jackson said. "You have to fly out to him. You have to fly out to wherever he is, take him to dinner and pick his brain to see what's important to him."

    A league source told Werder that the Browns share some of the blame simply because they haven't helped to create a support system for Gordon despite knowing of the issues when they drafted him.

     

    Jackson described Gordon as quiet around the team facility, a gamer and an unbelievable talent. But Gordon also was "one of those guys when he left the building that you worried about," according to Jackson.

    Gordon currently is facing a potential yearlong suspension for a marijuana charge in May. According to ProFooballTalk.com, Gordon planned to appeal the ruling in late July to get the number of games reduced. But his chances of winning that appeal are virtually zero after this additional incident.

    Jackson said Gordon's potential was off the charts as a football player. Now it is unknown when, or whether, the 23-year-old Gordon will get another chance to return to the NFL.

    "Josh Gordon was a big piece of the Browns' future; it's just unfortunate he didn't view it that way," Jackson said. "He is so valuable. He doesn't understand how valuable he is to an organization. He has no clue."

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from OnlyDaTruth. Show OnlyDaTruth's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    In response to rkarp's comment:
    [QUOTE]
    When an individual has a disease, taking responsibility and accountability must take a back seat to getting that individual help. 

    No one is placing blame on the team. Simply trying to help a young adult with substance problems. 

    It's pretty obvious, his family was unable to. It is also pretty obvious that VT was unable to or did not attempt to. The NFL may be Gordon's last chance at getting help and over coming this disease

     [/QUOTE]


    Maybe it's exactly that thought process that is really holding Gordon back - simply no accountability whatsoever.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from rkarp. Show rkarp's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    In response to OnlyDaTruth's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to rkarp's comment:
    [QUOTE]
    When an individual has a disease, taking responsibility and accountability must take a back seat to getting that individual help. 

    No one is placing blame on the team. Simply trying to help a young adult with substance problems. 

    It's pretty obvious, his family was unable to. It is also pretty obvious that VT was unable to or did not attempt to. The NFL may be Gordon's last chance at getting help and over coming this disease

     [/QUOTE]


    Maybe it's exactly that thought process that is really holding Gordon back - simply no accountability whatsoever.

    [/QUOTE]

    I am curious, have you ever had in your employ an individual with a personal problem that they had a very hard time over coming? if you did, did you kick them to the curb or unemployment line? When you gave them their 2 weeks severance, did you tell them to better account for themselves?

     

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from Muzwell. Show Muzwell's posts

    Re: Josh Gordon

    In response to rkarp's comment:


    the below info posted by ESPN's Jimmy Walker leads me to believe that the Browns nor the NFL have really helped this kid...


     


    linebacker and former Cleveland Browns team captain D'Qwell Jackson recalls multiple occasions when he tried to help troubled wide receiver Josh Gordon.Jackson and Gordon were teammates for two seasons in 2012 and 2013. As a nine-year veteran, Jackson took it upon himself to counsel Gordon about focusing on football and doing the right things off the field. That is particularly why Gordon's arrest on July 5 for suspected DWI in Raleigh, North Carolina, hit home for Jackson and led to one of the most thoughtful tweets from the NFL community.


    .....


    Jackson said Gordon's potential was off the charts as a football player. Now it is unknown when, or whether, the 23-year-old Gordon will get another chance to return to the NFL.


    "Josh Gordon was a big piece of the Browns' future; it's just unfortunate he didn't view it that way," Jackson said. "He is so valuable. He doesn't understand how valuable he is to an organization. He has no clue."




    Interesting stuff. We've seen this story play out many times in all sports. Sometimes it ends well, most often it doesn't. 


    The Browns have a business interest in Gordon. They should be doing what they have to do to protect that, and really that's it. If that means getting him additional help, then they should get him that help because it serves their interest. At some point though, when the situation becomes more trouble than it's worth, they will cut their losses. That's just how it is. It's the decision the Pats made with AH, Buddy Ryan made with Cris Carter and countless other teams have made with other players.


    It's no different than an injury in the sense that the team provides the treatment and the rehab and brings the guy back if he recovers sufficiently. If he doesn't, they cut him loose and he's on his own.


    The difference with substance abuse is trust. Substance abusers are usually weak-minded. They backslide when the going gets tough. Not all, obviously. But generally speaking. When the Browns decide they can't trust Gordon, he has to go. No matter how good he is. They may have already made that decision.

     

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