New Twist to Seau Suicide?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from TexasPat. Show TexasPat's posts

    New Twist to Seau Suicide?

         Was Junior Seau's suicide a Dave Duerson deal, in which he purposely shot himself in the chest, and not the head, to enable his brain to be studied after death? Such a theory seems to fit in perfectly to what appears to be the template of the trial lawyer's and the media, about how the NFL has failed to adequately protect it's players...and how the game has become too dangerous due to the long term, detrimental effects of concussions?

         Or, was Seau's death the result of a more mundane, common reason...that he was broke? Look at the facts. Seau continued playing in the league long past his prime...for nearly 20 years. Though one could argue that he was still an effective role player late in his career, and that he loved the game...could his motivation for hanging on so long have been based on financial issues? 
     
         This was Junior's second attempt at suicide...unless you're willing to swallow his explanation as to why he drove his vehicle off a cliff on 10-18-10 (fell asleep at the wheel)?: http://www.tmz.com/2010/10/18/junior-seau-i-wasnt-trying-to-kill-myself-suicide-attempt-carlsbad/ 

         Then, there's this: "Former Oilers cornerback Willie Alexander, who became a successful Houston financial planner in his football afterlife, participated in ex-teammate Charlie Joiner’s charity golf tournament in San Diego last fall. In the context of recent events, one conversation he had stands out chillingly.

    Alexander said he was told by “someone in a position to really know the truth, that Junior Seau was broke. I asked, ‘How could that be possible?’ And now, why isn’t it being reported?”

    The reason for the latter is that people around Seau are insisting money wasn’t an issue for him, although it’s uncertain how much anyone knew. Seau didn’t readily share his problems, even with close friends and family members. The possible reasons for his suicide at 43, three years after a 20-season Hall-of-Fame-caliber NFL career ended, might never be fully understood."
         Amen: http://blog.chron.com/ultimatetexans/2012/05/nfl-players-need-financial-game-plan-to-keep-from-going-bust/

         Query: Should the NFL be blamed for failing to properly advise the retired players in matters of financial planning? Or, is this, along with the concussion issue, another attempt to purge players of any and all personal responsibility for their decisions? Should we look to blame others and/or society every time a lottery winner squanders his once new found fortune...or whenever personal decisions don't turn out right?

         Compassion is a wonderful thing. But, where should it end...and where should the acceptance personal responsibility for ones' own actions kick in?    

      
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from magicalhobo. Show magicalhobo's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    In Response to New Twist to Seau Suicide?:
    [QUOTE]     Query: Should the NFL be blamed for failing to properly advise the retired players in matters of financial planning? Or, is this, along with the concussion issue, another attempt to purge players of any and all personal responsibility for their decisions? Should we look to blame others and/or society every time a lottery winner squanders his once new found fortune...or whenever personal decisions don't turn out right?      Compassion is a wonderful thing. But, where should it end...and where should the acceptance personal responsibility for ones' own actions kick in?      
    Posted by TexasPat[/QUOTE]
    No, the NFL should not be blamed for not advising grown adults how to use their money. These guys went to college and have had an opportunity to earn a ton of money. Why should the NFL be blamed for giving them the opportunity to grow wealthy? Again, these are adults we are talking about and the NFL shouldn't advise them on anything financial.

    It really pisses me off that people are making the NFL out to be some sort of evil organization that doesn't care about its employees. What company really does care about its employees? Maybe we should tear down the system and give Marxism another try?

    Come on, at some point the players have to be responsible for something. Let's stop treating them like children. Do some research and see if football can be made safer without ruining the integrity of the game, and if not at the end of the day it is these players' decisions whether or not they want to sacrifice their bodies for millions of dollars. If they can't figure out how to invest properly with the amount money they make playing football then they are idiots. Even the little practice squad guys who still make a hefty chunck of change for going to practice. These guys make enough to invest their money. If anything, maybe the NFLPA should advise the players since it cares so much about them?

    I'm just going to stop now...
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from andrewmcintosh. Show andrewmcintosh's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    Put simply, your employer doesn't "owe" you a thing.  Voluntary contract.  What happened to Junior was tragic, but I don't point the finger at the NFL, especially when 90% of the players in the league don't seem to give a darn about safety.  You hear what some of these guys are saying about the Saints bounty scheme, that somehow the players and coaches involved shouldn't be punished?  My sympathy is tempered by that type of attitude, if they don't have the intellectual capacity to recognize that a bounty scheme is detrimental to the game and player health, my sympathy dissapears.  It's not an employers job to protect people from themselves.  IMO.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ruup4travling. Show ruup4travling's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    i have a hard time buying that but it may be true. i wonder if he was getting an nfl pension?
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from AcheNot. Show AcheNot's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    In Response to New Twist to Seau Suicide?:
    [QUOTE]     This was Junior's second attempt at suicide...unless you're willing to swallow his explanation as to why he drove his vehicle off a cliff on 10-18-10 (fell asleep at the wheel)?: http://www.tmz.com/2010/10/18/junior-seau-i-wasnt-trying-to-kill-myself-suicide-attempt-carlsbad/
    Posted by TexasPat[/QUOTE]

    I didnt believe it either until I saw a picture of that "cliff"

    Looked more to me like a bunch of huge boulders on a slight incline, rather than a steep drop like I led myself to believe

    I dont know what the true story is, but if somone was looking to kill himself by driving over a cliff, that wouldnt be the cliff to drive off of IMO
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from NoMorePensionLooting. Show NoMorePensionLooting's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in America. The “reasons” for it are not truly understood but substance abuse and alcohol are usually common denominators.

     

    Close to 40,000 people choose to take themselves out in America every year. They come from all walks of life and throughout all professions.

     

    So somewhere between .01 and 0.2% of American’s do this every year.

     

    So a reasonable extraction of numbers means that it’s statistically likely that .01 to .02 percent of NFLer’s. both past and present, will take themselves out every year.

     

    It’s entirely within the realm of 95% probability that Seau is one of the 0.01 to 0.02 percent of NFLers that choose this end.

     

    It actually may have nothing to do with “football”, nothing to do with concussions, but simply a sad statistic that affects up to 40,000 families every year.

     

    Not trying to be cold here or disrespectful to Seau’s family, as I greatly respected him as a player. I do however believe the media, as usual, has sensationalized a very complicated and very difficult mental heath issue and may be unfairly targeting the NFL.

     

    If concussions contribute to suicides in the NFL then it needs to be studied. But any study, to be considered valid, must also keep in mind the above statistics.

     

    And of course from a medical issue the league should continue to do whatever it can to minimize concussions and make sure players get proper treatment and rest when they experience one.

     

    Rest in peace Jr.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    In Response to New Twist to Seau Suicide?:
    [QUOTE]     Was Junior Seau's suicide a Dave Duerson deal, in which he purposely shot himself in the chest, and not the head, to enable his brain to be studied after death? Such a theory seems to fit in perfectly to what appears to be the template of the trial lawyer's and the media, about how the NFL has failed to adequately protect it's players...and how the game has become too dangerous due to the long term, detrimental effects of concussions?      Or, was Seau's death the result of a more mundane, common reason...that he was broke? Look at the facts. Seau continued playing in the league long past his prime...for nearly 20 years. Though one could argue that he was still an effective role player late in his career, and that he loved the game...could his motivation for hanging on so long have been based on financial issues?         This was Junior's second attempt at suicide...unless you're willing to swallow his explanation as to why he drove his vehicle off a cliff on 10-18-10 (fell asleep at the wheel)?: http://www.tmz.com/2010/10/18/junior-seau-i-wasnt-trying-to-kill-myself-suicide-attempt-carlsbad/        Then, there's this: "Former Oilers cornerback Willie Alexander, who became a successful Houston financial planner in his football afterlife, participated in ex-teammate Charlie Joiner’s charity golf tournament in San Diego last fall. In the context of recent events, one conversation he had stands out chillingly. Alexander said he was told by “someone in a position to really know the truth, that Junior Seau was broke. I asked, ‘How could that be possible?’ And now, why isn’t it being reported?” The reason for the latter is that people around Seau are insisting money wasn’t an issue for him, although it’s uncertain how much anyone knew. Seau didn’t readily share his problems, even with close friends and family members. The possible reasons for his suicide at 43, three years after a 20-season Hall-of-Fame-caliber NFL career ended, might never be fully understood."      Amen: http://blog.chron.com/ultimatetexans/2012/05/nfl-players-need-financial-game-plan-to-keep-from-going-bust/      Query: Should the NFL be blamed for failing to properly advise the retired players in matters of financial planning? Or, is this, along with the concussion issue, another attempt to purge players of any and all personal responsibility for their decisions? Should we look to blame others and/or society every time a lottery winner squanders his once new found fortune...or whenever personal decisions don't turn out right?      Compassion is a wonderful thing. But, where should it end...and where should the acceptance personal responsibility for ones' own actions kick in?      
    Posted by TexasPat[/QUOTE]

    I don't know . . . maybe write a note to Jesus and ask him where compassion for your fellow man should end.

    I bet he'd say never.



     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?


    The guy killed himself and now we have people (on all sides of the issue) trying to make political hay out of it.  Disgusting really. 

    Leave the guy in peace.

    If it turns out he had brain damage from playing football and that likely led to his death then something really needs to be done (1) to help players who have already suffered damage and (2) to prevent more such damage from happening in the future. 

    Are the players and their unions responsible? Yes.  Are the team owners and league responsible? Yes.  And are we the fans responsible? Yes.  

    Anyone who enjoys or profits from football is responsible.  And that includes leagues, owners, unions, players . . . and us the fans.  Even you, Tex Pat. 


     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from mia76. Show mia76's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    Just one note - there are millions of people who have lived with all sorts of brain damage and never thought of suicide, just as most suicides are not the result of previous brain damage.
    This and the law suits and the bountygate penalties have all come together as a perfect media storm.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from rainbowroosie. Show rainbowroosie's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    Living in the limelight then falling out of it is difficult for all athletes. Probably true for astronauts and other high viz people as well. Whatever the reason, this is a very sad story. I hope his family and friends heal quickly from their loss.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Paul_K. Show Paul_K's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    There are a bunch of possible reasons. 

    1.  Many NFL vets are hooked on painkillers for their joint damage.  Some commit felonies to pay for their habits.

    2.  To work is to live, and for a number of these guys football is the only life they knew.  Pride and lack of education can keep them from coaching at a high school.

    3.  Living without half a brain is terrible to one's ego.

    4.  Yes men can blow through a million bucks just by day trading stocks.  It's a get poor quick scheme.  It's also a good reason for social security, so that extremely smart (the worst kind!) gambling addicts can't blow through their money while they are young.  The NFLPA should consider a forced social security fund with a monthly check sent out.

    5.  One price of being 1000% devoted to football is a total lack of social grace.  Sometimes the fish doesn't really know how to swim in the sea.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from TFB12. Show TFB12's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    I know nothing about Junior Seau but I am going to say, based on a couple things I do know about, that I don't think his way of committing suicide had anything to do with wanting to keep his brain intact for study.  I believe He had money problems and found it difficult to live life after football.

    A relative of mine seen Junior down in Cabo. He was with some buddies and lots of women living it up.  It looked like he was the one paying for everything.  It looked like this was a way of life for him as described by my relative.  This is fine and dandy when you have a nice football contract but when that isn't coming in anymore and you continue to live like it is then you will have money problems.  Also, it has been reported that Juniors restaurant was doing horrible and was going to close.

    I imagine it's hard for ex-players to live a normal life after football, both financially and mentally.  They are used to being admired, catered to and oogled upon during their career, it's a lot of change after they walk away unless they have another great gig lined up.

    I am sure football does cause brain problems.  I'm sure lots of things cause brain problems.  Boxing causes brain problems yet I don't recall fighters or ex-fighters committing suicide more then the average.  Also, based on averages are football players committing suicide more then non football players?

    Football is going to be facing huge problems concerning head injuries.  It doesn't look good for the future of football unless the NFL gets aggressive here and starts pointing fingers at players who even though go to college then are still uneducated and don't know how to handle their money or social problems after football. 

    Not sure I make any valid points here, I'm just kind of sharing thoughts.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from NYC. Show NYC's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    In Response to New Twist to Seau Suicide?:
    [QUOTE]     Was Junior Seau's suicide a Dave Duerson deal, in which he purposely shot himself in the chest, and not the head, to enable his brain to be studied after death? Such a theory seems to fit in perfectly to what appears to be the template of the trial lawyer's and the media, about how the NFL has failed to adequately protect it's players...and how the game has become too dangerous due to the long term, detrimental effects of concussions?      Or, was Seau's death the result of a more mundane, common reason...that he was broke? Look at the facts. Seau continued playing in the league long past his prime...for nearly 20 years. Though one could argue that he was still an effective role player late in his career, and that he loved the game...could his motivation for hanging on so long have been based on financial issues?         This was Junior's second attempt at suicide...unless you're willing to swallow his explanation as to why he drove his vehicle off a cliff on 10-18-10 (fell asleep at the wheel)?: http://www.tmz.com/2010/10/18/junior-seau-i-wasnt-trying-to-kill-myself-suicide-attempt-carlsbad/        Then, there's this: "Former Oilers cornerback Willie Alexander, who became a successful Houston financial planner in his football afterlife, participated in ex-teammate Charlie Joiner’s charity golf tournament in San Diego last fall. In the context of recent events, one conversation he had stands out chillingly. Alexander said he was told by “someone in a position to really know the truth, that Junior Seau was broke. I asked, ‘How could that be possible?’ And now, why isn’t it being reported?” The reason for the latter is that people around Seau are insisting money wasn’t an issue for him, although it’s uncertain how much anyone knew. Seau didn’t readily share his problems, even with close friends and family members. The possible reasons for his suicide at 43, three years after a 20-season Hall-of-Fame-caliber NFL career ended, might never be fully understood."      Amen: http://blog.chron.com/ultimatetexans/2012/05/nfl-players-need-financial-game-plan-to-keep-from-going-bust/      Query: Should the NFL be blamed for failing to properly advise the retired players in matters of financial planning? Or, is this, along with the concussion issue, another attempt to purge players of any and all personal responsibility for their decisions? Should we look to blame others and/or society every time a lottery winner squanders his once new found fortune...or whenever personal decisions don't turn out right?      Compassion is a wonderful thing. But, where should it end...and where should the acceptance personal responsibility for ones' own actions kick in?      
    Posted by TexasPat[/QUOTE]

    Tex

    You are confusing 2 issues and collapsing them into some kind of Republican/Libertarian philosophy.  Personal financial mismanagement and the hiding of real health risks regarding the after-effects of concussions are not the same thing. The league did not inform, it looked the other way. It did nothing to protect the health of players long term. The players had to fight just to get health insurance.

    However, in that sense, we are all guilty. We have all wanted to look the other way when one of our guys was injured. We wanted him to go back out there despite the fact that taking another hit might damage him for life. We were selfish and egocentric and just thought about our team winning no matter the costs. 

    So, its on everybody. Saying: "They're responsible for themselves" is just a cop out, a way for us to not take responsibility for wanting them to sacrifice themselves but then deny any culpability afterwards. It is too much to ask to have someone put themselves in a situation where they could be brain injured and then not take care of them afterwards. In fact, it is shameful to then tell them it is "their own responsibility/fault".


     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from rtuinila. Show rtuinila's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    In Response to New Twist to Seau Suicide?:
    [QUOTE]     Was Junior Seau's suicide a Dave Duerson deal, in which he purposely shot himself in the chest, and not the head, to enable his brain to be studied after death? Such a theory seems to fit in perfectly to what appears to be the template of the trial lawyer's and the media, about how the NFL has failed to adequately protect it's players...and how the game has become too dangerous due to the long term, detrimental effects of concussions?      Or, was Seau's death the result of a more mundane, common reason...that he was broke? Look at the facts. Seau continued playing in the league long past his prime...for nearly 20 years. Though one could argue that he was still an effective role player late in his career, and that he loved the game...could his motivation for hanging on so long have been based on financial issues?         This was Junior's second attempt at suicide...unless you're willing to swallow his explanation as to why he drove his vehicle off a cliff on 10-18-10 (fell asleep at the wheel)?: http://www.tmz.com/2010/10/18/junior-seau-i-wasnt-trying-to-kill-myself-suicide-attempt-carlsbad/        Then, there's this: "Former Oilers cornerback Willie Alexander, who became a successful Houston financial planner in his football afterlife, participated in ex-teammate Charlie Joiner’s charity golf tournament in San Diego last fall. In the context of recent events, one conversation he had stands out chillingly. Alexander said he was told by “someone in a position to really know the truth, that Junior Seau was broke. I asked, ‘How could that be possible?’ And now, why isn’t it being reported?” The reason for the latter is that people around Seau are insisting money wasn’t an issue for him, although it’s uncertain how much anyone knew. Seau didn’t readily share his problems, even with close friends and family members. The possible reasons for his suicide at 43, three years after a 20-season Hall-of-Fame-caliber NFL career ended, might never be fully understood."      Amen: http://blog.chron.com/ultimatetexans/2012/05/nfl-players-need-financial-game-plan-to-keep-from-going-bust/      Query: Should the NFL be blamed for failing to properly advise the retired players in matters of financial planning? Or, is this, along with the concussion issue, another attempt to purge players of any and all personal responsibility for their decisions? Should we look to blame others and/or society every time a lottery winner squanders his once new found fortune...or whenever personal decisions don't turn out right?      Compassion is a wonderful thing. But, where should it end...and where should the acceptance personal responsibility for ones' own actions kick in?      
    Posted by TexasPat[/QUOTE]

    Calling out Jr Seau like this is an ugly and inhumane thing to do. He obviously took responsibility for his actions to the nth degree.

    TP, did you own a business and abuse your employees so bad you lost a law suit or something? The reason I ask is you keep wanting to absolve ownership of any responsibility for the well being of their employees. Which would put the owners in the position of being the greedy ones. Unwilling to lend a hand to a person that gave up their quality of life so the owners could make a buck.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from rtuinila. Show rtuinila's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    In Response to Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to New Twist to Seau Suicide? : No, the NFL should not be blamed for not advising grown adults how to use their money. These guys went to college and have had an opportunity to earn a ton of money. Why should the NFL be blamed for giving them the opportunity to grow wealthy? Again, these are adults we are talking about and the NFL shouldn't advise them on anything financial. It really pisses me off that people are making the NFL out to be some sort of evil organization that doesn't care about its employees. What company really does care about its employees? Maybe we should tear down the system and give Marxism another try? Come on, at some point the players have to be responsible for something. Let's stop treating them like children. Do some research and see if football can be made safer without ruining the integrity of the game, and if not at the end of the day it is these players' decisions whether or not they want to sacrifice their bodies for millions of dollars. If they can't figure out how to invest properly with the amount money they make playing football then they are idiots. Even the little practice squad guys who still make a hefty chunck of change for going to practice. These guys make enough to invest their money. If anything, maybe the NFLPA should advise the players since it cares so much about them? I'm just going to stop now...
    Posted by magicalhobo[/QUOTE]

    Practice squad players make about $88,000 a year with no benefits. With todays cost of living, that doesn't leave much to invest.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hetchinspete. Show Hetchinspete's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    In Response to Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?:
    [QUOTE]Just one note - there are millions of people who have lived with all sorts of brain damage and never thought of suicide, just as most suicides are not the result of previous brain damage. This and the law suits and the bountygate penalties have all come together as a perfect media storm.
    Posted by mia76[/QUOTE]

    Yes a good point but you miss a point or two. First everyones personal makeup is different so given the same circumstances each person reacts differently. Secondly, Depression has been mentioned in Seau's case which is entirely possible. Depression is an awful thing to go through which I've experienced first hand and if undiagnosed or cared for can cause one enough pain to wish to live no longer. 

    In Mr. Seau's case if he was going through any Depession, loss of career, financial issues, possible permanant brain damage all put together could very readily have contributed to him taking of his own life. Unless you've gone through Depression or have dealt with it first hand with family or friends it's very difficult if not impossible to understand.  

    I won't go into detail on this page but I've dealt with Depression first hand so I know and understand the implications of the condition. 

    Hetchinspete. 
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hetchinspete. Show Hetchinspete's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    In Response to Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide? : Practice squad players make about $88,000 a year with no benefits. With todays cost of living, that doesn't leave much to invest.
    Posted by rtuinila[/QUOTE]

    Are you kidding me. Compared to the everyday player $88K might not seem like much, but Health insurance for a single uninsured but healthy person might be $500 a month and at most with condition of sorts $1000 a month, that leaves somewhere around $77-$82K per year after insurance, well above what most of us make yearly and with plenty to invest. If I made that type of money I'd easily be able to put $25-30K away per year in investments. My advice to you is to get a reality check. 

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from pezz4pats. Show pezz4pats's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    In Response to Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide? : Practice squad players make about $88,000 a year with no benefits. With todays cost of living, that doesn't leave much to invest.
    Posted by rtuinila[/QUOTE]

    M. Carter made 550,000.00 on the ps.  I think the minimum is like 120k.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Quagmire3. Show Quagmire3's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    In Response to Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide? : M. Carter made 550,000.00 on the ps.  I think the minimum is like 120k.
    Posted by pezz4pats[/QUOTE]

    Markel Carter made $155K and recently got a raise to $305K (source; recent Reiss article sry cant find the link) never 550K. Also Tex you may be on to something with the fianncial aspect. Might explain why his wife left him also. I learned after many years in law enforcement that things are very rarely as the initially appear.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    In Response to Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide? : Are you kidding me. Compared to the everyday player $88K might not seem like much, but Health insurance for a single uninsured but healthy person might be $500 a month and at most with condition of sorts $1000 a month, that leaves somewhere around $77-$82K per year after insurance, well above what most of us make yearly and with plenty to invest. If I made that type of money I'd easily be able to put $25-30K away per year in investments. My advice to you is to get a reality check. 
    Posted by Hetchinspete[/QUOTE]


    Health insurance on the private market for a person in a high-risk category can easily cost $15,000 to $20,000 a year and that only covers you for the year you buy it.  If the symptoms occur three years down the road, the coverage you bought while playing won't help you. 

    This is a long-term (potentially life-long) problem for guys who suffer serious brain damage.  One year of insurance coverage doesn't solve the problem.  




     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    In Response to Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to New Twist to Seau Suicide? : Tex You are confusing 2 issues and collapsing them into some kind of Republican/Libertarian philosophy.  Personal financial mismanagement and the hiding of real health risks regarding the after-effects of concussions are not the same thing. The league did not inform, it looked the other way. It did nothing to protect the health of players long term. The players had to fight just to get health insurance. However, in that sense, we are all guilty. We have all wanted to look the other way when one of our guys was injured. We wanted him to go back out there despite the fact that taking another hit might damage him for life. We were selfish and egocentric and just thought about our team winning no matter the costs.  So, its on everybody. Saying: "They're responsible for themselves" is just a cop out, a way for us to not take responsibility for wanting them to sacrifice themselves but then deny any culpability afterwards. It is too much to ask to have someone put themselves in a situation where they could be brain injured and then not take care of them afterwards. In fact, it is shameful to then tell them it is "their own responsibility/fault".
    Posted by NYC[/QUOTE]

    Good post.  There's a quote in Dostoevsky's Brothers Karamazov that reads something like "everyone is really responsible to all men for all men and for everything."

    This is the highest moral standard anyone can ever live by and maybe one of the most profound statements ever made by any author.  What our Republican ideologues fail to realize is that by saying individuals are responsible on their own for what happens to them, they are actually shirking their own higher "responsibility to all men for all men and for everything."

    It's interesting that it's the very same people who claim they are for "Christian values" that want to shirk this responsibility.  It is, in fact, the morality at the heart of Jesus's teaching and for which he set the ultimate example by giving his own life so all men, no matter how wretched and sinful, could live. 

    Now back to all this casting of stones . . . 
     
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    In Response to Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide? : M. Carter made 550,000.00 on the ps.  I think the minimum is like 120k.
    Posted by pezz4pats[/QUOTE]


    The minimum is a weekly salary of about $6,000, but they're only paid it during the season.  Typically, they earn around $90,000 for the year.  That's not bad for a partial year of work, but it hardly makes one rich.  
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?



    One other point here.  The depression and financial problems that some are claiming are possibly the "real" cause of some of these suicides could very well be themselves symptoms of brain damange.  Brain damage can cause depression and also reduces one's ability to make good choices.  For guys who start showing symptoms of brain damange in their late 30s and early 40s, they can face a life of hell where they are really mentally unable to make good decisions for decades. They lose their money, their families, and whatever happiness they may have had in life.  It's pretty tragic really and, if you have any compassion at all, should give you just a little pause as you think about the pleasure you take watching this sport each Sunday afternoon. 

    I'm not saying football should be abolished by any means.  Or that all risk can or even should be taken out of the game.  But something should be done to help players who may end up debilitated for life as a result of providing us a few hours of pleasure every Sunday afternoon. 

    Human decency requires no less. 





     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from pezz4pats. Show pezz4pats's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    In Response to Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide? : Markel Carter made $155K and recently got a raise to $305K (source; recent Reiss article sry cant find the link) never 550K. Also Tex you may be on to something with the fianncial aspect. Might explain why his wife left him also. I learned after many years in law enforcement that things are very rarely as the initially appear.
    Posted by Quagmire3[/QUOTE]

    My bad, I could have swore I read 550 but it was 306k.

    Practice squad defensive end/outside linebacker Markell Carter had his practice squad salary doubled by the Patriots. Carter, the sixth-round draft choice from Central Arkansas who was making $149,000, is now on the books for $306,000.

    The practice squad minimum is $96,900.

    This was expected as Carter recently had an opportunity to sign with another team, but elected to stay in New England. Usually when that happens, the Patriots reward the player with either a pay boost or a promotion to the active roster. Carter is now the highest paid member of the Patriots' practice squad.

    Carter, who has earned practice player of the week honors six times this season, is one candidate to possibly help fill the void created with Andre Carter's injury
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from NYC. Show NYC's posts

    Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?

    In Response to Re: New Twist to Seau Suicide?:
    [QUOTE]One other point here.  The depression and financial problems that some are claiming are possibly the "real" cause of some of these suicides could very well be themselves symptoms of brain damange.  Brain damage can cause depression and also reduces one's ability to make good choices.  For guys who start showing symptoms of brain damange in their late 30s and early 40s, they can face a life of hell where they are really mentally unable to make good decisions for decades. They lose their money, their families, and whatever happiness they may have had in life.  It's pretty tragic really and, if you have any compassion at all, should give you just a little pause as you think about the pleasure you take watching this sport each Sunday afternoon.  I'm not saying football should be abolished by any means.  Or that all risk can or even should be taken out of the game.  But something should be done to help players who may end up debilitated for life as a result of providing us a few hours of pleasure every Sunday afternoon.  Human decency requires no less. 
    Posted by prolate0spheroid[/QUOTE]

    We get great pleasure from watching the Pats and the NFL. For me, it is not about the hits, it is about understanding the strategy. And I have admired the Pats for doing more, with less. Nonetheless, I am troubled by all the difficulties the players are having no matter what their origin. (Traumatic brain injury, debilitating osteo-arthritic cases, financial mishaps, drug abuse, domestic difficulties etc.). It certainly shows that something is wrong in this picture. Perhaps, it is a mirror of society and all our difficulties or it is something more: a toxic combination of traumatic hits, addiction to a violent, fame intoxicating lifestyle, financial unpreparedness as a result of "too much, too soon" without education as to how to manage things, marriage for the wrong reason, loss of all this upon end of career, resulting depresssion along with loss of cognitive and motor capabilities. Wow! That's a lot of stuff to handle. I'm grateful I am not an NFL player. 

    On top of all this some of us say, "well, there getting paid a fortune for it". As far as I am concerned it is not enough, in fact it can never be enough. I would rather be poor and go live under a bridge with my wife and go eat at a soup kitchen than go through this. Money is never enough to cover up deep pain, deep hurt, deep loss, physical, emotional and social. 
     
Sections
Shortcuts

Share