Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from UD6. Show UD6's posts

    Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors

    I suspect you meant shortsighted? and nothing could be further from the truth.  

    My comment was directly related to those who've suggested that Manning's condition and subsequent surgery makes him somehow "more fragile" and susceptible paralyzation.  I was simply responding that there are reports, including the one cited which includes direct quotes from the neurosurgeon for the Steelers, completely to the contrary. 

    I never said there weren't other risks, but generally physical damage and subsequent surgery carries with it potential future risk.  I am willing to bet the farm that those risks have been communicated to Manning, and based on the information I have read including your comments, they don't relate to increased risk of paralyzation.  

    It's my understanding that Manning had the surgery so that he could play football again.  Had he chosen to never play again, the surgery may have been unnecessary unless there was no hope that the pinched nerve could not resolve itself with less stress.  There is no guarantee that Manning fully recovers to the strength level he seeks, either at all or within the time frame needed to continue to play, but again that has nothing to do with increased risk of paralyzation.      

    I am not sure if you read the article that I attached to my post.  Here is a small excerpt. 

    "Last winter, two former Colts players had the same procedure, and the team says they have fully resumed their careers.

    A 2011 study in the journal Spine found that after having a similar surgery, 40 players had come back to play in the NFL again."

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from pezz4pats. Show pezz4pats's posts

    Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors

    Not increased risk of paralyzation, per se, but increased risk to the corresponding discs that would perpetuate the problem.
    The surgery could have been avoided if the risk was also avoided.
    I have 5 herniated discs in my neck (to varying degrees) and have avoided surgery by avoiding what caused it in the first place.  Problem is, simply moving the wrong way causes pain, but avoiding impact lessens the probability of the discs being injured further.
     
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    Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors

    having two bones fused together should definitely limits and alters neck movement. i have to think that the rigidity of the two fused bones also increases likelihood of paralysis above and below the fused bones.

    i'm not sure if he's going to retire or not, but i refuse to believe that there's no loss/alteration of neck motion and no increased injury risk.  this isn't lower down on his back where it's marginalized.  it's his neck.

    i wish him the best and i'd be sad to see him go, but it's gotten serious.  i wouldn't be surprised if he retired.
     
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  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from UD6. Show UD6's posts

    Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors

    In Response to Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors:
    [QUOTE]Not increased risk of paralyzation, per se, but increased risk to the corresponding discs that would perpetuate the problem. The surgery could have been avoided if the risk was also avoided. I have 5 herniated discs in my neck (to varying degrees) and have avoided surgery by avoiding what caused it in the first place.  Problem is, simply moving the wrong way causes pain, but avoiding impact lessens the probability of the discs being injured further.
    Posted by pezz4pats[/QUOTE]

    Pezz - I understand what you are saying, and I don't disagree with it.  The increased pressure on other discs due to the removal of one makes perfectly logical sense.  The point I was making is that people were suggesting Manning hang it up to save himself from the increased risk of paralyzation which I am saying doesn't exist. 

    In fact, as noted in the article, many players have similar surgery and go back and play the game.  Manning's biggest concern isn't the neck at all but whether or not the nerve that was pinched regenerates itself fully.  If it does, I see no reason why Manning can't return to his elite level of play.  Outside of this pinched nerve, he's been remarkably healthy throughout his career. 
     
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    Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors

    In Response to Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors:
    [QUOTE]having two bones fused together should definitely limits and alters neck movement. i have to think that the rigidity of the two fused bones also increases likelihood of paralysis above and below the fused bones. i'm not sure if he's going to retire or not, but i refuse to believe that there's no loss/alteration of neck motion and no increased injury risk.  this isn't lower down on his back where it's marginalized.  it's his neck. i wish him the best and i'd be sad to see him go, but it's gotten serious.  i wouldn't be surprised if he retired.
    Posted by Artist-Frmrly-Knwn-As-NickC1188[/QUOTE]
    Nick, it certainly seems counterintuitive, but I will refer you back to the article I cited and the words of the Steelers neurosurgeon:

    "This didn't ruin his career - it saved it, because it's going to get him out of pain and stabilize his spine and he should make a full recovery," Maroon said.

    People who have this procedure don't notice any loss of movement, and most go back to regular work within five to 10 days. They may have a sore throat for several days, but most do well within two to three weeks, Maroon said.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from pezz4pats. Show pezz4pats's posts

    Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors

    In Response to Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors : Pezz - I understand what you are saying, and I don't disagree with it.  The increased pressure on other discs due to the removal of one makes perfectly logical sense.  The point I was making is that people were suggesting Manning hang it up to save himself from the increased risk of paralyzation which I am saying doesn't exist.  In fact, as noted in the article, many players have similar surgery and go back and play the game.  Manning's biggest concern isn't the neck at all but whether or not the nerve that was pinched regenerates itself fully.  If it does, I see no reason why Manning can't return to his elite level of play.  Outside of this pinched nerve, he's been remarkably healthy throughout his career. 
    Posted by UD6[/QUOTE]

    What the article doesn't say is how many didn't come back and their ages.  That matters.
    Also should factor in that he has more money than most 3rd world countries.
    Why risk further injury?  The potential for it is defiantly there.
    There's a difference between someone that is merely driving and one that is intentionally hitting walls with a weakened bumper and damaged frame.
    Just sayin.
     
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  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from UD6. Show UD6's posts

    Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors

    In Response to Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors : What the article doesn't say is how many didn't come back and their ages.  That matters. Also should factor in that he has more money than most 3rd world countries. Why risk further injury?  The potential for it is defiantly there. There's a difference between someone that is merely driving and one that is intentionally hitting walls with a weakened bumper and damaged frame. Just sayin.
    Posted by pezz4pats[/QUOTE]

    What injury do you think he is risking?  a) Any injury or b) injury specifically related to the condition he's resolved? 

    If a) that would be the same for everyone else playing the game.  If b) he had the surgery to resolve the issue, and structurally (as indicated in the article) the area will be stronger than it was before. 

    The question that remains and the thing that will cause him to retire, imo, has to do with the nerve.  If it regenerates, he'll play.  If not, he may not.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from pezz4pats. Show pezz4pats's posts

    Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors

    Well, just like I said.  A damaged bumper is not as strong as a clean one.
    A soldered piece is not as strong as the original.
    There is now less shock absorbing quality. They removed one of 7 discs and fused the vertebra together. That section now has no mobility and places ADDED STRESS on the others.
    The two adjoining discs are now more prone to injury and that's for anyone. 
    Getting crushed by 300lb lineman doesn't help.
    Who are these other players that had the surgery?  NFL players?
    I think I heard of one and I can't even remember who that was.  Someone insignificant.  Well not insignificant but you know what I mean.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from UD6. Show UD6's posts

    Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors

    Yet two undamaged pieces grafted together may actually be stronger than the two pieces originally separated by spongy material in the middle.  There is now more mass.  fusing live bone cells is not like soldering inanimate metal.  When the bone cells fuse to one another, it is my understanding that they bond in the same way any bone cell bonds to another.  There's no weak seam.

    for example, when ACL's are reconstructed the most common method is to take a piece of the patellar tendon along with a graft of bone at each end.  The tendon is then placed in the anitomically correct location of the former ACL and secured to the tibia and femur where the bone cells can fuse together.  If there was a weakness to that fusion the surgery would be regularly ineffective.  Its not.   

    As for the mobility - back to the neursurgeon:  People who have this procedure don't notice any loss of movement.

    As for who the players are, I don't know. 
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from pezz4pats. Show pezz4pats's posts

    Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors

    In Response to Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors:
    [QUOTE]Yet two undamaged pieces grafted together may actually be stronger than the two pieces originally separated by spongy material in the middle.  There is now more mass.  fusing live bone cells is not like soldering inanimate metal.  When the bone cells fuse to one another, it is my understanding that they bond in the same way any bone cell bonds to another.  There's no weak seam. for example, when ACL's are reconstructed the most common method is to take a piece of the patellar tendon along with a graft of bone at each end.  The tendon is then placed in the anitomically correct location of the former ACL and secured to the tibia and femur where the bone cells can fuse together.  If there was a weakness to that fusion the surgery would be regularly ineffective.  Its not.    As for the mobility - back to the neursurgeon:  People who have this procedure don't notice any loss of movement. As for who the players are, I don't know. 
    Posted by UD6[/QUOTE]

    I don't know what else to tell you to make you understand.
    The neck was not fixed, it was compromised.  They removed what was causing the pain and in turn made the spine more prone to injury.
    I am telling you this from my own experience and from what my Dr. told me.
    There is also a good possibility that with trauma that the fusion could break and there is also a good possibility that the over worked adjoining discs could also be damaged more easily.  There is also a chance of leaking spinal fluid with traumatic injury and narrowing of the spinal canal, which you defiantly don't want.
    I'm sure the Dr's will go over this with him.
    It's his choice but to me, it was a no brainer. 
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from UD6. Show UD6's posts

    Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors

    In Response to Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors : I don't know what else to tell you to make you understand. The neck was not fixed, it was compromised.  They removed what was causing the pain and in turn made the spine more prone to injury. I am telling you this from my own experience and from what my Dr. told me. There is also a good possibility that with trauma that the fusion could break and there is also a good possibility that the over worked adjoining discs could also be damaged more easily.  There is also a chance of leaking spinal fluid with traumatic injury and narrowing of the spinal canal, which you defiantly don't want. I'm sure the Dr's will go over this with him. It's his choice but to me, it was a no brainer. 
    Posted by pezz4pats[/QUOTE]

    Pezz - you don't need to make me understand anything.  I can take your word for it, or the neurosurgeon for the Steelers word for it.  I choose the expert

    "This didn't ruin his career - it saved it, because it's going to get him out of pain and stabilize his spine and he should make a full recovery," Maroon said.

    And my thoughts are still the same.  This isn't about the fusion.  Its about the nerve and its subsequent regeneration.  If that doesn't happen to the extent they hope and/or expect, he won't play.  If it does, then I think he does. 
     
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    Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors

    In Response to Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Peyton Manning Retirement Rumors : Pezz - you don't need to make me understand anything.  I can take your word for it, or the neurosurgeon for the Steelers word for it.  I choose the expert "This didn't ruin his career - it saved it, because it's going to get him out of pain and stabilize his spine and he should make a full recovery," Maroon said. And my thoughts are still the same.  This isn't about the fusion.  Its about the nerve and its subsequent regeneration.  If that doesn't happen to the extent they hope and/or expect, he won't play.  If it does, then I think he does. 
    Posted by UD6[/QUOTE]

    Ok, Dog
    What ever helps you sleep at night.
    All I know is that most people aren't born with 6 discs in their neck with one missing and fused.
    If you think it's good as new, then all the power to you all. 
    Good Luck with that.
    (pun intended) LOL
     
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