Platooning Quarterbacks

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Paul_K. Show Paul_K's posts

    Platooning Quarterbacks

    Precedents for platooning quarterbacks:


    New England firmly believes in the “thunder and lightning” platooning approach for running backs. BB tries to keep a mix of RBs on his bench, from 250 pound guys like Blount to shifty scatbacks such as Finch. That’s because switching running backs works. Defenses usually can’t change gears all game between two or three different running styles, and so defenses play back on their heels.


    Miami used the wildcat quite successfully against New England, at least for one game.  Effective long-range platooning requires that each quarterback have a fairly complex skill set that can't be easily countered with time.


    Brady:


    Tom Brady is a dink-and-dunk passer. Brady never did have pinpoint accuracy at 40 yards. Nor can he run. That said, Brady is a king in the NFL at what he does. He’s not far from tops in the NFL in first and ten situations and he’s number one in the NFL at second and five situations. Brady sells the play-action with devastating effect. Then he gets rid of the ball faster than any other NFL starter. He spots holes in the defense easily. He hits his receivers in stride so that they usually pick up yards after the catch on a three-yard toss. With a full set of hot receivers in the 2012 season, Brady and company set an NFL record for most first downs in a regular season.


    However, Brady is worse than 3/4 of the NFL’s starting quarterbacks at third and ten situations, or worse, at third and fifteen. Other teams don’t respect the play action on third and long -- the book says to rush three and drop eight into coverage. Nor do teams cover the deep ball. Brady can’t throw thirty yards with any degree of accuracy, and so no opponent’s defense double-covers deep. They simply blanket the area between 10 and 20 yards deep with defensive backs. Brady eventually throws the ball where his receivers have about a 25% to 50% of catching it, and then more times than not the defense comes gleefully off the field.


    Mallett:


    Mallett should be a high percentage choice on third and long situations. He can throw the ball 50 yards with accuracy. This means that safeties have to stay deep, which opens up the field between 10 and 20 yards downfield on most third and ten situations.


    Whenever Brady takes a sack (not that often), play pretty much stops, which means that the Patriots’ hurry-up stops. It’s not that bad a time to bring in Mallett, especially on third and long. If Mallett gets the first down, he retains the option of sometimes running up to the line of scrimmage and hiking the ball quickly.


    Any quarterback including Brady can get a bit gun-shy if he’s being slammed around. On rare occasions, giving Brady a blow after a rough pounding might do him a bit of good.


    Garoppolo:


    Jimmy G. has legs. He runs a 4.5 40-yard dash. If the Patriots are up by two touchdowns in the fourth quarter and if everyone in the stadium expects the Pats to run the football, why pretend to pass? The play action won’t fool anyone. The Garopper can still occasionally drop back and set up in the pocket, but he always carries the risk of breaking containment and running for a five-yard gain. He can also roll out and make one cut if no one’s open and if a cutback lane opens. Like Tom Brady, Garoppolo has a lightning-fast release of the football for picking up 6 yards at a clip. He can hit occasional 30-yard passes better than Brady, but that’s not his game.


    Naming the Backup:


    Tom Brady is 37 years old and is on a pitch count to protect his shoulder. If BB has two good backup quarterbacks, perhaps he should hang on to both of them. Moreover, BB should consider using the backups sometimes to save Tom’s arm.


    For game 1 in September, let Miami prepare equally for both backup quarterbacks. Why should Coach Belichick give valuable information, naming the backup, to an opponent’s coaching staff a week early so that they can practice for that quarterback? Why not let Miami be totally unprepared for this contingency?


    BB has to designate his emergency quarterback just before game time. If the two backup quarterbacks are equal at this time, Garoppolo should be the third emergency quarterback. Under the rules, Garoppolo can still come in after the start of the fourth quarter, and that’s when he’d be most useful.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from BostonTrollSpanker. Show BostonTrollSpanker's posts

    Re: Platooning Quarterbacks

    lmao @ this 


    Putting Mallet it in third and long - sure....


    "Nor do teams cover the deep ball."
    True - because we haven't had a receiver who could get open. I remember Brady completing to Moss on many occasions. 


    Eli Manning isn't the most accurate deep passer and he's connected on plenty of deep balls to the tune of two championships. 


    No QB is perfect but there is no modern precedent for platooning your way to a championship. 


    The side point of making teams prepare for two backup QBs doesn't do much for me - we're never going to hear a team say, "yeah, we could have beaten new england if we hadn't had to prepare for two backup QBs" - better to trade Mallet for a tight end. Then the draft ends up making much more sense. 


     


    I would suggest maybe a video game as you're not going to see this platoon option on the field


     


     


     


       

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from BostonTrollSpanker. Show BostonTrollSpanker's posts

    Re: Platooning Quarterbacks

    p.s. Peyton can only throw for about 20 yards now, should Denver platoon also?

       
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from OnlyDaTruth. Show OnlyDaTruth's posts

    Re: Platooning Quarterbacks

    Agree for the most part re: Brady.  He's prolly the hardest working, "smartest"/most experienced of the three - but has forgotten how to do the little things - like looking off his attended receiver, pump fakes, hitting the open man vs. forcing the ball. Works a very complex offense.


    Mallett: does have a strong arm; which is his strength and weakness. He is prone to overthrowing long balls (which is okay so long as no defenders are playing deeper than patriot WRs), and has little touch for short or intermediate passes. Tries to work the same complex offense as Brady - obviously hasn't mastered it after 4 years.  He appears "calm" - but I don't know if that means he's got it under control or simply doesn't care.


    Jimmy G: I think the kid has touch on his ball - and can chuck it pretty good too.  Working a simpler offense. He's doing all the little things Brady used to do during his early days.  


    IMO - I'd let Mallett go, open up a slot for an area where we need depth, and take our chances if Brady gets hurt. If you keep things simple for Jimmy G on the offense - and give the defense the reins to keep a game close - the Patriots have a solid chance of winning some games w/ Jimmy G.


    Not sure about platooning the QBs, but there might be one or two "trick" plays up BB's sleeve that might come up during a game.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ghostofjri37. Show ghostofjri37's posts

    Re: Platooning Quarterbacks

    um…NO

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from pezz4pats. Show pezz4pats's posts

    Re: Platooning Quarterbacks

    In response to BostonTrollSpanker's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    lmao @ this 

     

    Putting Mallet it in third and long - sure....

     

    "Nor do teams cover the deep ball."
    True - because we haven't had a receiver who could get open. I remember Brady completing to Moss on many occasions. 

     

    Eli Manning isn't the most accurate deep passer and he's connected on plenty of deep balls to the tune of two championships. 

     

    No QB is perfect but there is no modern precedent for platooning your way to a championship. 

     

    The side point of making teams prepare for two backup QBs doesn't do much for me - we're never going to hear a team say, "yeah, we could have beaten new england if we hadn't had to prepare for two backup QBs" - better to trade Mallet for a tight end. Then the draft ends up making much more sense. 

     

     

     

    I would suggest maybe a video game as you're not going to see this platoon option on the field

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

       

    [/QUOTE]


    [object HTMLDivElement]

     

    Yes, This ^^^

    Brady led the league in passes over 20 when he actually had a legit down hill receiver.

    Something we haven't seen in 5 years.

    Funny how receivers influence that, ask Flacco.

    Mallet has no control over his cannon.  One nice pass last night and everything else was overthrown.

    He needs some air under those passes.

    Grop is showing well after two games.  Initially hated the pick because of other needs but he appears to be a good one.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from mthurl. Show mthurl's posts

    Re: Platooning Quarterbacks

    I just don't think you can do this. You can't just take out a QB and have another guy come in to throw long balls, for one thing you are telling the defense that Mallett or Garoppolo are coming in to throw it deep, then the D will just play for the deep pass. Brady was actually pretty good on the long pass when he had a deep threat to throw it to, but he hasn't had that in years. None of our receivers over the last 4 years were capable of running a blazing 40...you need speed to get deep, if not speed, then height. We have had neither. 

    It does look like JG throws it deep better than Brady and Mallett has a cannon, but until JG takes over the starter spot for good, I don't think you'll see him on the field during the regular season. 

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Not-A-Shot. Show Not-A-Shot's posts

    Re: Platooning Quarterbacks

    There are many problems here, but one stands out more than the rest:

     

    Mallett sucks.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from Low-FB-IQ. Show Low-FB-IQ's posts

    Re: Platooning Quarterbacks

    ummm NO

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from prolate0spheroid. Show prolate0spheroid's posts

    Re: Platooning Quarterbacks

     

    Was Brady's deep throw to Edelman a bad one?  I didn't think so.  The throw to Thompkins for the TD was a thing of beauty.  Brady may not have the best deep ball in the league, but it's still good.  I think the major issue is he hasn't had a good deep receiver for years.  Even in the preseason this year, it's been Tyms who's been the best deep receiver and Brady hasn't thrown to him yet I don't believe.  I'm not even sure they've been on the field together. 

     

     

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from DoNotSleepOnThePats. Show DoNotSleepOnThePats's posts

    Re: Platooning Quarterbacks

    Yeah no. Belichick isn't taking the ball out of Brady's hands during a game.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from crazy-world-of-troybrown. Show crazy-world-of-troybrown's posts

    Re: Platooning Quarterbacks

    Just saw a play where Tymes was open and Mallet over threw him about 35 yards downfield.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from crazy-world-of-troybrown. Show crazy-world-of-troybrown's posts

    Re: Platooning Quarterbacks

    My observation is a good running game, make it easier for young QB's.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from tcal2-. Show tcal2-'s posts

    Re: Platooning Quarterbacks

    In response to Not-A-Shot's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    There are many problems here, but one stands out more than the rest:

     

    Mallett sucks.

    [/QUOTE]

    ^^^^ well said

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from Paul_K. Show Paul_K's posts

    Re: Platooning Quarterbacks

    In response to BostonTrollSpanker's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    p.s. Peyton can only throw for about 20 yards now, should Denver platoon also?

       [/QUOTE]


    Does Denver have a choice of quarterbacks?

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from Paul_K. Show Paul_K's posts

    Re: Platooning Quarterbacks

    All right, I'm hearing that Brady didn't have anybody open deep last year, and this year he has tall receivers growing like corn:  LaFell, Tyms, Gronk, Dobson for starters, plus an H-back to be named later?  Tyms doesn't count against the 53 man limit in September.  This crew can't outrun cornerbacks but they can box the cornerbacks out, then outjump the cornerbacks and defend bad passes like Randy Moss once did. 


    Brady's passing in the 21 yard to 30 yard range was at the absolute bottom of the NFL standings according to ProFootballFocus.  Some of that may have been Brady's receivers, but Brady himself deserves some of the statistic.  The other thing Brady doesn't do is roll out.


    So why shouldn't Garoppolo get in the mix on second and three when the Pats are ahead by two touchdowns in the middle of the fourth quarter?  Is there a value to messing with the defense's heads?

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from freediro. Show freediro's posts

    Re: Platooning Quarterbacks

    Yeah, good luck getting Brady off the field to bring in Mallet or Garoppola, he would just look to the sidelines with a screw that face then call his own play and win the game for us. BB has way too much invested in this offense to just bring in a QB to throw deep bombs and this is why people on forums are on forums and not the sidelines...why tip your hand so obviously by solely bringing in a QB for deep passes. It's not like we have a QB that can run the wildcat and throw deep passes, then we might be talking about something. The idea Brady comes out of game is nonsense unless we are up by over 28 points in the 4th quarter or he is still playing at the age of 42 and his arm is honestly about to fall off.

     
     
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