Ray Lewis the Greatest Defender Ever??

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Ray Lewis the Greatest Defender Ever??

    In response to wozzy's comment:

    Bruce Smith, Reggie White, Deion Sanders, Ronnie Lott, Charles Haley, Ty Law, Willie McGinest... I don't go in for lists, they're the domain of list takers but I can reel off a list of defenders who were at least equal to or better than Ray Lewis.  Don't take anything away from him, he was probably the best open field tackler at LB of his generation, the closest thing to him now is Mayo.  I've always respected Lewis except when his entourage stabbed that guy and ran but that's Dade County for you...



    Law & McGinest? Andre Tippett maybe. Homerish

     
  2. This post has been removed.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Ray Lewis the Greatest Defender Ever??

    In response to RockScully's comment:

    In response to nhsteven's comment:

    Overlooked:

     

    Herb Adderley, Emlen Tunnel, Dick LeBeau, Johnny Robinson, Merlin Olsen, Nigh Train Lane, Chuck Bednarik, Gino Marchetti, Mel Blount, Randy White, Willie Brown, Bobby Bell, Joe Schmidt, Willie Davis, Michael Strahan, LeRoy Selmon, Roger Werhli, Junior Seau, Richard Dent, L.C. Greenwood, Jack Youngblood, Paul Krause,  Lester "Stick 'em" Hayes

     

    I apologize for repeats




    You forgot Larry "Wildcat" Wilson, arguably my all time team starting Safety next to Ronnie Lott.

    Wilson is renowned for not only playing, but intercepting a pass, with casts on both hands due to broken wrists. On the September 18, 2006 edition of SportsCenter, Mike Ditka challenged Terrell Owens' toughness by not playing for 2–4 weeks due to a broken finger. He cited Wilson's interception with casts on both hands as proof of a tougher football player. He ended his career with 52 career picks for 800 yards and five touchdowns.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larry_Wilson_(American_football)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IiQ-FHsuN3A

    Nice list, though. I'd put Wilson and Big Daddy Lipscomb as part of the most underrated all time club on defense.  No one ever mentions them, but they were incredible players in their era.

    Nice call on Bobby Bell, too. Those Chiefs Ds in that era are underrated.



    LOL, I was thinking of Larry Wilson (and remembered that incident; also Jack Youngblood played a SB with a broken leg), but left him out at the last second. And the imbecile who speculated that Butkus ran a 6.0 second 40 yarder was too much (It's 4.5 seconds, at least before the knees went)

     

    When the subject is QB, the most overlooked IMO are (due to not being recent) Sammy Baugh, Otto Graham, and a notch behind would be Jurgensen

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from TexasPat. Show TexasPat's posts

    Re: Ray Lewis the Greatest Defender Ever??

    In response to jri37's comment:

    In response to Jets's comment:

    What bothers me is your long winded epic posts that are made even longer by reposting.

    Get to the F'n point and move on.

    So is everybody having a productive day?




     Leon, Leon Leon...Looks like you might be a tad aggrevated. It is ugly when you lash out like this. What can we do to make your time of the month a better experience?



         Yeah...he's upset. I can tell...because he played the "spygate" card...LOL!!!  

     

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from TexasPat. Show TexasPat's posts

    Re: Ray Lewis the Greatest Defender Ever??

    In response to nhsteven's comment:

    Overlooked:

     

    Herb Adderley, Emlen Tunnel, Dick LeBeau, Johnny Robinson, Merlin Olsen, Nigh Train Lane, Chuck Bednarik, Gino Marchetti, Mel Blount, Randy White, Willie Brown, Bobby Bell, Joe Schmidt, Willie Davis, Michael Strahan, LeRoy Selmon, Roger Werhli, Junior Seau, Richard Dent, L.C. Greenwood, Jack Youngblood, Paul Krause,  Lester "Stick 'em" Hayes

     I apologize for repeats



         Love the Mantle photo, nh...though I'm a Sox fan.   

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Ray Lewis the Greatest Defender Ever??

    In response to TexasPat's comment:

    In response to nhsteven's comment:

    Overlooked:

     

    Herb Adderley, Emlen Tunnel, Dick LeBeau, Johnny Robinson, Merlin Olsen, Nigh Train Lane, Chuck Bednarik, Gino Marchetti, Mel Blount, Randy White, Willie Brown, Bobby Bell, Joe Schmidt, Willie Davis, Michael Strahan, LeRoy Selmon, Roger Werhli, Junior Seau, Richard Dent, L.C. Greenwood, Jack Youngblood, Paul Krause,  Lester "Stick 'em" Hayes

     I apologize for repeats



         Love the Mantle photo, nh...though I'm a Sox fan.   




    He's one guy as a general rule Sox fans seem to admire, like Mo. He could have been even better if it wasn't for the injuries & partying. Was as clutch as they come; for an example, check out the brilliant base running stunt that extended the 1960 WS. Incredible natural talent before the boo-boos started piling up.

    Unfortunately, I think RGIII is headed in the same direction. The MRI on the knee proved "inconclusive". I think the great Dr. Andrews has made mistakes with him. Draw your own opinion.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from TexasPat. Show TexasPat's posts

    Re: Ray Lewis the Greatest Defender Ever??

    In response to nhsteven's comment:

    In response to TexasPat's comment:

    In response to nhsteven's comment:

    Overlooked:

     

    Herb Adderley, Emlen Tunnel, Dick LeBeau, Johnny Robinson, Merlin Olsen, Nigh Train Lane, Chuck Bednarik, Gino Marchetti, Mel Blount, Randy White, Willie Brown, Bobby Bell, Joe Schmidt, Willie Davis, Michael Strahan, LeRoy Selmon, Roger Werhli, Junior Seau, Richard Dent, L.C. Greenwood, Jack Youngblood, Paul Krause,  Lester "Stick 'em" Hayes

     I apologize for repeats



         Love the Mantle photo, nh...though I'm a Sox fan.   




    He's one guy as a general rule Sox fans seem to admire, like Mo. He could have been even better if it wasn't for the injuries & partying. Was as clutch as they come; for an example, check out the brilliant base running stunt that extended the 1960 WS. Incredible natural talent before the boo-boos started piling up.



         A different era. Sports medicine was still in the Stone Age then...and alcohol consumption was thought to be a cool, "manly" thing that guys did. No one really understood, or even paid attention to the consequences...much like with smoking.

     

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from 56redsox. Show 56redsox's posts

    Re: Ray Lewis the Greatest Defender Ever??

    In response to nhsteven's comment:

    In response to TexasPat's comment:

    In response to nhsteven's comment:

    Overlooked:

     

    Herb Adderley, Emlen Tunnel, Dick LeBeau, Johnny Robinson, Merlin Olsen, Nigh Train Lane, Chuck Bednarik, Gino Marchetti, Mel Blount, Randy White, Willie Brown, Bobby Bell, Joe Schmidt, Willie Davis, Michael Strahan, LeRoy Selmon, Roger Werhli, Junior Seau, Richard Dent, L.C. Greenwood, Jack Youngblood, Paul Krause,  Lester "Stick 'em" Hayes

     I apologize for repeats



         Love the Mantle photo, nh...though I'm a Sox fan.   




    He's one guy as a general rule Sox fans seem to admire, like Mo. He could have been even better if it wasn't for the injuries & partying.




    Met Mantle Outside The Convention In Las Vegas At A Card Show, He Wanted 50$ For Autograph, Must Have Needed A Couple Bottles, I Said No Way Mic, Went Inside And Hung Out With Bobby Doerr, Class Act Guy.......

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Ray Lewis the Greatest Defender Ever??

    In response to 56redsox's comment:

    In response to nhsteven's comment:

    In response to TexasPat's comment:

    In response to nhsteven's comment:

    Overlooked:

     

    Herb Adderley, Emlen Tunnel, Dick LeBeau, Johnny Robinson, Merlin Olsen, Nigh Train Lane, Chuck Bednarik, Gino Marchetti, Mel Blount, Randy White, Willie Brown, Bobby Bell, Joe Schmidt, Willie Davis, Michael Strahan, LeRoy Selmon, Roger Werhli, Junior Seau, Richard Dent, L.C. Greenwood, Jack Youngblood, Paul Krause,  Lester "Stick 'em" Hayes

     I apologize for repeats



         Love the Mantle photo, nh...though I'm a Sox fan.   




    He's one guy as a general rule Sox fans seem to admire, like Mo. He could have been even better if it wasn't for the injuries & partying.




    Met Mantle Outside The Convention In Las Vegas At A Card Show, He Wanted 50$ For Autograph, Must Have Needed A Couple Bottles, I Said No Way Mic, Went Inside And Hung Out With Bobby Doerr, Class Act Guy.......



    Had different experience when meeting him; was at J. DiMag/Mantle card show in '90; Mantle couldn't have been nicer, DiMag was a pr-ck. Of course, I understand Mantle could blow hot & cold; DiMag was more consistently nasty; even though they got along, just ask Teddy Ballgame (when he was alive).

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from NCPatsFan1971. Show NCPatsFan1971's posts

    Re: Ray Lewis the Greatest Defender Ever??

    Lots of great players named but Dick Butkus was quite a character on the field.   I remember a few years back when an Offensive Lineman was talking about while he was playing a game and was set in a Three Point Stance.  He looked down at his hand and saw a giant sized Lunger lying on it.  As the story goes, Butkus would cough one up and deliver it to try to get the Offense to move for an illegal procedure penalty.  LOL

     

    I guess Butkus did this quite often and here is a snippet from Lions Center Ed Flanagan.

     

    "Butkus used to verbally taunt Lions center Ed Flanagan. Then Butkus would spit on Flanagan’s hands as the center grabbed hold of the football prior to the snap."

     

    http://thegregger63.wordpress.com/tag/dick-butkus/

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from TexasPat. Show TexasPat's posts

    Re: Ray Lewis the Greatest Defender Ever??

         For those of you who never saw him play, let me introduce y'all to Dick Butkus: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sxR9qYSHt8U; and http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/classic/bio/news/story?page=Butkus_Dick

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from TexasPat. Show TexasPat's posts

    Re: Ray Lewis the Greatest Defender Ever??

         As Ray Lewis continues to be lionized and glorified for his great NFL career, nonetheless, the shadow, and stigma of that night in Atlanta, should always remain:  

    As we celebrate Ray Lewis, don't forget murder victims January 5, 2013 | Mike Bianchi, SPORTS COMMENTARY

    On the day Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis announced he would be retiring after this season, my thoughts drifted back to a bitterly cold winter day in a cemetery in Akron, Ohio.

    That's where Richard Lollar was buried and where his bespectacled grandmother, Joyce Lollar, showed me his grave more than a decade ago.

    As I wrote then, she crunched through the snow with leafless trees etched against a gray Midwestern skyline. A frozen drizzle fell from above. With her shoe, she scraped the snow and the ice and the dirt from her grandson's grave site and said a short prayer that ended with: "We miss you, Richard. We love you."

    And then she broke down and cried. And then the sadness turned to madness as she spoke bitterly about how she felt Ray Lewis and his "gang of hoodlums" literally got away with murder.

    "They stabbed my Richard five times in vital places — the heart, the liver," she said angrily. "They don't even kill animals like that. This was no bar fight; this was a slaughter. This was a thrill-killing."

    Amid this week-long celebration and commemoration of Ray Lewis' brilliant, Hall of Fame career, let us not forget that he was once charged with killing Richard Lollar and Jacinth Baker — two men whose murders were never solved. Two men whose families are, no doubt, still haunted by the fact that brutal, bloody killers are still out there somewhere running free.

    Ray Lewis may or may not be the greatest linebacker of all-time, but he has certainly pulled off the greatest comeback story in the history of sports. He is considered a role model, a team leader, a man known for his hard work on the field and his charitable work off of it.

    To fathom the scope of his redemptive powers, all you have to do is click on the two separate Wikipedia pages of Lewis and Michael Vick. In the opening paragraph of Vick's, it mentions his notorious episode of dog-killing. In Lewis' opening paragraph, it chronicles his Pro Bowls, his Super Bowl MVP, even the torn triceps that kept him sidelined for much of this season. But there is not a single mention of the fact that he once was charged with murdering two men.

    "Everybody's gone on with their lives; everybody but us," Joyce Lollar told me in 2001, a year after her grandson was murdered and a few days before Lewis was named the MVP of Super Bowl XXXV. "Ray Lewis is living his dream, but what about my grandson's dreams? Our family's been destroyed, and now we have to watch Ray Lewis prancing around in the Super Bowl. It makes me sick to my stomach."

    Joyce raised Richard Lollar, who was left dead in the street in the early morning hours on Jan. 31, 2000, — a few hours after the Rams defeated the Titans in one of the most thrilling Super Bowls in history. And then came one of the most chilling post-Super Bowl scenes in history. A brawl outside the Cobalt Lounge, an upscale Atlanta nightclub, turned into gory spectacle of steely knives, mangled flesh and a river of blood. The 24-year-old Lollar and his 21-year-old boyhood buddy from Akron, Jacinth Baker, were both stabbed multiple times in the heart, the knives savagely twisted into their vital organs. The killers knew exactly what they were doing.

    Lewis, his two good friends — Reginald Oakley and Joseph Sweeting — and nine others sped away from the crime scene in a 40-foot Lincoln limousine. Lewis, Oakley and Sweeting were charged with the killings and cleared in a controversial court decision that still leaves many questions unanswered.

    Why, when Lewis made an appearance at a sporting goods store the day before the Super Bowl, did his friends buy knives at the store?

    Why did witnesses say the limo pulled over and someone dumped bloody clothes into a trash bin?

    Why was the white suit Ray Lewis wore that night never found?

    Why did the limo driver change his story mid-trial after originally testifying that Lewis told everyone to "just keep your mouth shut and don't say nothing"? Originally, the driver told police he saw Lewis actively taking part in the bloody brawl and heard Oakley and Sweeting admit to stabbing someone. But he backed off those statements when he got on the witness stand.

    Why did prosecutors reduce the murder charge against Lewis to misdemeanor obstruction of justice? It was a plea deal in which Lewis agreed to testify against his two friends, Oakley and Sweeting, who were later acquitted after Lewis' testimony failed to implicate them in the murders.

    "Why were people changing their stories?" Joyce Lollar asked on the way to the cemetery that day. "… The jury didn't know who or what to believe. By lying and deceiving from the beginning, Ray Lewis helped set everybody free."

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from TripleOG. Show TripleOG's posts

    Re: Ray Lewis the Greatest Defender Ever??

    In response to TexasPat's comment:

         As Ray Lewis continues to be lionized and glorified for his great NFL career, nonetheless, the shadow, and stigma of that night in Atlanta, should always remain:  

    As we celebrate Ray Lewis, don't forget murder victims January 5, 2013 | Mike Bianchi, SPORTS COMMENTARY

    On the day Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis announced he would be retiring after this season, my thoughts drifted back to a bitterly cold winter day in a cemetery in Akron, Ohio.

    That's where Richard Lollar was buried and where his bespectacled grandmother, Joyce Lollar, showed me his grave more than a decade ago.

    As I wrote then, she crunched through the snow with leafless trees etched against a gray Midwestern skyline. A frozen drizzle fell from above. With her shoe, she scraped the snow and the ice and the dirt from her grandson's grave site and said a short prayer that ended with: "We miss you, Richard. We love you."

    And then she broke down and cried. And then the sadness turned to madness as she spoke bitterly about how she felt Ray Lewis and his "gang of hoodlums" literally got away with murder.

    "They stabbed my Richard five times in vital places — the heart, the liver," she said angrily. "They don't even kill animals like that. This was no bar fight; this was a slaughter. This was a thrill-killing."

    Amid this week-long celebration and commemoration of Ray Lewis' brilliant, Hall of Fame career, let us not forget that he was once charged with killing Richard Lollar and Jacinth Baker — two men whose murders were never solved. Two men whose families are, no doubt, still haunted by the fact that brutal, bloody killers are still out there somewhere running free.

    Ray Lewis may or may not be the greatest linebacker of all-time, but he has certainly pulled off the greatest comeback story in the history of sports. He is considered a role model, a team leader, a man known for his hard work on the field and his charitable work off of it.

    To fathom the scope of his redemptive powers, all you have to do is click on the two separate Wikipedia pages of Lewis and Michael Vick. In the opening paragraph of Vick's, it mentions his notorious episode of dog-killing. In Lewis' opening paragraph, it chronicles his Pro Bowls, his Super Bowl MVP, even the torn triceps that kept him sidelined for much of this season. But there is not a single mention of the fact that he once was charged with murdering two men.

    "Everybody's gone on with their lives; everybody but us," Joyce Lollar told me in 2001, a year after her grandson was murdered and a few days before Lewis was named the MVP of Super Bowl XXXV. "Ray Lewis is living his dream, but what about my grandson's dreams? Our family's been destroyed, and now we have to watch Ray Lewis prancing around in the Super Bowl. It makes me sick to my stomach."

    Joyce raised Richard Lollar, who was left dead in the street in the early morning hours on Jan. 31, 2000, — a few hours after the Rams defeated the Titans in one of the most thrilling Super Bowls in history. And then came one of the most chilling post-Super Bowl scenes in history. A brawl outside the Cobalt Lounge, an upscale Atlanta nightclub, turned into gory spectacle of steely knives, mangled flesh and a river of blood. The 24-year-old Lollar and his 21-year-old boyhood buddy from Akron, Jacinth Baker, were both stabbed multiple times in the heart, the knives savagely twisted into their vital organs. The killers knew exactly what they were doing.

    Lewis, his two good friends — Reginald Oakley and Joseph Sweeting — and nine others sped away from the crime scene in a 40-foot Lincoln limousine. Lewis, Oakley and Sweeting were charged with the killings and cleared in a controversial court decision that still leaves many questions unanswered.

    Why, when Lewis made an appearance at a sporting goods store the day before the Super Bowl, did his friends buy knives at the store?

    Why did witnesses say the limo pulled over and someone dumped bloody clothes into a trash bin?

    Why was the white suit Ray Lewis wore that night never found?

    Why did the limo driver change his story mid-trial after originally testifying that Lewis told everyone to "just keep your mouth shut and don't say nothing"? Originally, the driver told police he saw Lewis actively taking part in the bloody brawl and heard Oakley and Sweeting admit to stabbing someone. But he backed off those statements when he got on the witness stand.

    Why did prosecutors reduce the murder charge against Lewis to misdemeanor obstruction of justice? It was a plea deal in which Lewis agreed to testify against his two friends, Oakley and Sweeting, who were later acquitted after Lewis' testimony failed to implicate them in the murders.

    "Why were people changing their stories?" Joyce Lollar asked on the way to the cemetery that day. "… The jury didn't know who or what to believe. By lying and deceiving from the beginning, Ray Lewis helped set everybody free."




     

    Are you serious?  Do you have proof of him murdering anyone??  Where you there that night. I am not saying he didnt but c'mon man, this is going too far and just showing you are a hater. Its funny how when Javon Belcher killed his wife , the only news was why did he kill himself and what did the NFL do to him, was he on drugs,etc,. Noone will admit he was a p.os. who killed his wife but people wanna play Judge on a guy who wasnt convicted of anything...Just stop it please.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from Muzwell. Show Muzwell's posts

    Re: Ray Lewis the Greatest Defender Ever??

    Nobody's mentioned Moses Hightower? Or Mongo?

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from TexasPat. Show TexasPat's posts

    Re: Ray Lewis the Greatest Defender Ever??

         In order to be fair, and in response to the criticism from the uncle of Ray Lewis that I received above for posting the Bianchi article, here is an article that counters what Bianchi had to say. It probably paints a clearer picture as to what actually happened, that night in Atlanta: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1473116-ray-lewis-critics-who-bring-up-controversial-past-need-to-get-facts-straight 

     
Sections
Shortcuts

Share