Sums Up The Defense

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from OnlyDaTruth. Show OnlyDaTruth's posts

    Sums Up The Defense


    "The defense, once the heart of a team that won three Super Bowls between 2001 and 2004, became less dominant as the pass rush evaporated and the secondary became a revolving door for defensive backs. Until cornerback Aqib Talib joined the Patriots after a trade midway through the 2012 season, there really hadn't been much confidence in how the team defended the pass."


    http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/11045782/darrelle-revis-cornerback-huge-year

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from DoNotSleepOnThePats. Show DoNotSleepOnThePats's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    I've been watching several Patriots games on NFL Game Rewind on my iPad the past week or so and I've noticed that even though the defense slowly got better from 2011 to last season, they could not get off the damn field on 3rd down to save their lives.  They have to do that this year and I believe the additions and players coming back from injury will help with that.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from ATJ. Show ATJ's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    I would like to think that with the upgrades at the corners, a healthy VW and Kelley and improved LB play the getting-off-the-field-on-3d down issue will shrink quite a bit.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from ghostofjri37. Show ghostofjri37's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    In response to DoNotSleepOnThePats' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I've been watching several Patriots games on NFL Game Rewind on my iPad the past week or so and I've noticed that even though the defense slowly got better from 2011 to last season, they could not get off the damn field on 3rd down to save their lives.  They have to do that this year and I believe the additions and players coming back from injury will help with that.

    [/QUOTE]

    You hit the nail on the head regarding 3rd down D. In 2010 they were last in the league at 47%, 2011 43%, 2012 40% and last year 42%.

    If they really want to be an elite D in this league they need to bring that number down below 37%.

     

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from TripleOG. Show TripleOG's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    In response to ghostofjri37's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to DoNotSleepOnThePats' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I've been watching several Patriots games on NFL Game Rewind on my iPad the past week or so and I've noticed that even though the defense slowly got better from 2011 to last season, they could not get off the damn field on 3rd down to save their lives.  They have to do that this year and I believe the additions and players coming back from injury will help with that.

    [/QUOTE]

    You hit the nail on the head regarding 3rd down D. In 2010 they were last in the league at 47%, 2011 43%, 2012 40% and last year 42%.

    If they really want to be an elite D in this league they need to bring that number down below 37%.

     

    [/QUOTE]


    [object HTMLDivElement]

     

    It was the worst because you cant have NO pass Rush AND Chitty CBs. which is what our D has looked like for a while outside the few games during the year when Talib was healthy but come playoff time, we were doormats again.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from ghostofjri37. Show ghostofjri37's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    In response to TripleOG's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to ghostofjri37's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to DoNotSleepOnThePats' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I've been watching several Patriots games on NFL Game Rewind on my iPad the past week or so and I've noticed that even though the defense slowly got better from 2011 to last season, they could not get off the damn field on 3rd down to save their lives.  They have to do that this year and I believe the additions and players coming back from injury will help with that.

    [/QUOTE]

    You hit the nail on the head regarding 3rd down D. In 2010 they were last in the league at 47%, 2011 43%, 2012 40% and last year 42%.

    If they really want to be an elite D in this league they need to bring that number down below 37%.

     [/QUOTE]

    [object HTMLDivElement]

     It was the worst because you cant have NO pass Rush AND Chitty CBs. which is what our D has looked like for a while outside the few games during the year when Talib was healthy but come playoff time, we were doormats again.

    [/QUOTE]
    Well lets hope Will Smith has something left in the tank, Buchanan can make the 2nd year leap, the rotation of Kelly, Vince and Easly is enough on the inside to take some double teams away from Chandler Jones.

    The secondary with the additions of Revis and Browner should be enough. Heck, even if they had only added Revis it should be enough.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from pezz4pats. Show pezz4pats's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    In response to DoNotSleepOnThePats' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I've been watching several Patriots games on NFL Game Rewind on my iPad the past week or so and I've noticed that even though the defense slowly got better from 2011 to last season, they could not get off the damn field on 3rd down to save their lives.  They have to do that this year and I believe the additions and players coming back from injury will help with that.

    [/QUOTE]


    [object HTMLDivElement]

     

    Ahhhhaaa, a light bulb moment.

    That's exactly what some of us meanies, have been complaining about for years.

    D is on the field too long means the O can't be

    D is on the field too long and it reduces scoring opportunities.

    Reduced time on the field coupled with reduced scoring opportunities means the O can't score as many points.(neither O)

    Reduced time on the field and reduced scoring opportunities means the O has to become one dimensional.

    Reduced time and possessions means they need to try and score quickly which eliminates running the ball.

    Unbalanced teams, for those very reasons, don't win SB's.

    High scoring teams require the time and possessions to do their thing.

    Poor D's that can't get off the field don't allow for that.

    It may work against lessor teams (not always) but it will never work against the better teams with the ability to exploit that.

    High yardage is directly associated with poor 3rd down D's.

    High yardage and poor 3rd down D's directly correlates with too much time on the field.

    Too much time for the D KILLS the O.

    Repeat as needed.

     

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsEng. Show PatsEng's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    In response to ghostofjri37's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    Well lets hope Will Smith has something left in the tank, Buchanan can make the 2nd year leap, the rotation of Kelly, Vince and Easly is enough on the inside to take some double teams away from Chandler Jones.

    The secondary with the additions of Revis and Browner should be enough. Heck, even if they had only added Revis it should be enough.

    [/QUOTE]


    [object HTMLDivElement]

    If Easley is healthy it should go a long way. Still though, I wish they did a little more for the pass rush this year and added a bit more LB depth. The front 7 has me a bit concerned with all the injures coming back and the complete lack of depth that wore out our outside edge rush and LB core. The secondary I don't have much of a concern this year, which helps a ton, but I still stick to the age old concept that a good QB will find holes in any secondary if given enough time but even an average secondary will look probowl caliber with the right pass rush.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from crazy-world-of-troybrown. Show crazy-world-of-troybrown's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    In response to DoNotSleepOnThePats' comment:


    I've been watching several Patriots games on NFL Game Rewind on my iPad the past week or so and I've noticed that even though the defense slowly got better from 2011 to last season, they could not get off the damn field on 3rd down to save their lives.  They have to do that this year and I believe the additions and players coming back from injury will help with that.


    Bingo, terrible 3rd down Defense, for a while now. Patricia not aggressive enough sometimes, and some players who should not be on the field. That's why I wanted more speed at the LB-Safety position in the Draft.


     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from rtuinila. Show rtuinila's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    Don't forget, the NFL has gone through two sets of rule changes since 2006. I'm sure those may have had an effect on how New Englands D has been built.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from ghostofjri37. Show ghostofjri37's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    In response to PatsEng's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to ghostofjri37's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    Well lets hope Will Smith has something left in the tank, Buchanan can make the 2nd year leap, the rotation of Kelly, Vince and Easly is enough on the inside to take some double teams away from Chandler Jones.

    The secondary with the additions of Revis and Browner should be enough. Heck, even if they had only added Revis it should be enough.

    [/QUOTE]


    [object HTMLDivElement]

    If Easley is healthy it should go a long way. Still though, I wish they did a little more for the pass rush this year and added a bit more LB depth. The front 7 has me a bit concerned with all the injures coming back and the complete lack of depth that wore out our outside edge rush and LB core. The secondary I don't have much of a concern this year, which helps a ton, but I still stick to the age old concept that a good QB will find holes in any secondary if given enough time but even an average secondary will look probowl caliber with the right pass rush.

    [/QUOTE]
    Yeah, you could call the front 7 sort of an enigma... lot of young potential and upside with good veteran leadership and way to many injury questions. This injury thing is getting very frustrating.

     

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from pezz4pats. Show pezz4pats's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    In response to rtuinila's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Don't forget, the NFL has gone through two sets of rule changes since 2006. I'm sure those may have had an effect on how New Englands D has been built.

    [/QUOTE]


    [object HTMLDivElement]

    So, are you saying that all the other GM/coaches with better D's could adapt but beebee couldn't?

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from digger0862. Show digger0862's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    It doesn't sum up this season. Dynasties don't last forever.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from mthurl. Show mthurl's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    Our defense over the last 5/6 six years has been so frustrating to watch...can't cover? Check! Can't pass rush? Check! Opposing qb's are made to look like hall of famer's? Chicky Check!

    I honestly can't believe how easy our defense makes it on opposing qb's...the windows we leave them to throw into are unheard of...the time they are allowed to survey the field is ridiculous...and the confidence the opposing QB gains as the game goes on is demoralizing. There was a time when qb's didn't want to face a Belichick coached defense...when there was all this talk about how he'd confuse you...can't do that with the defenses we've rolled out onto that field over the last half decade. They have become a laughing stock, hopefully that will change this year...I'm sure it will with Revis here. I honestly think if all goes well this will be a top 7 defense (one that can be counted on again).

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from OnlyDaTruth. Show OnlyDaTruth's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    In response to PatsEng's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to ghostofjri37's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    Well lets hope Will Smith has something left in the tank, Buchanan can make the 2nd year leap, the rotation of Kelly, Vince and Easly is enough on the inside to take some double teams away from Chandler Jones.

    The secondary with the additions of Revis and Browner should be enough. Heck, even if they had only added Revis it should be enough.

    [/QUOTE]


    [object HTMLDivElement]

    If Easley is healthy it should go a long way. Still though, I wish they did a little more for the pass rush this year and added a bit more LB depth. The front 7 has me a bit concerned with all the injures coming back and the complete lack of depth that wore out our outside edge rush and LB core. The secondary I don't have much of a concern this year, which helps a ton, but I still stick to the age old concept that a good QB will find holes in any secondary if given enough time but even an average secondary will look probowl caliber with the right pass rush.

    [/QUOTE]

    agreed on the pass rush

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from agcsbill. Show agcsbill's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    In response to DoNotSleepOnThePats' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I've been watching several Patriots games on NFL Game Rewind on my iPad the past week or so and I've noticed that even though the defense slowly got better from 2011 to last season, they could not get off the damn field on 3rd down to save their lives.  They have to do that this year and I believe the additions and players coming back from injury will help with that.

    [/QUOTE]

    Reason #1 they lost SBs 42 & 46!!!!


    [object HTMLDivElement]

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from ghostofjri37. Show ghostofjri37's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    In response to agcsbill's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to DoNotSleepOnThePats' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I've been watching several Patriots games on NFL Game Rewind on my iPad the past week or so and I've noticed that even though the defense slowly got better from 2011 to last season, they could not get off the damn field on 3rd down to save their lives.  They have to do that this year and I believe the additions and players coming back from injury will help with that.

    [/QUOTE]

    Reason #1 they lost SBs 42 & 46!!!!


    [object HTMLDivElement]

    [/QUOTE]

    In 46 they did not produce one single 3 and out.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    Well, I for one believe that since Polian and the NFL "re-emphasized" the 5 yard chuck rule that Belichick built 5 Super Bowl championship defense's around that BB has had trouble adapting to this new league. He came up in the 70's to 2000's and made his bones by shutting down great QB's on the biggest stage.

    The NFL has since stifled the way BB learned to coach defense and has paved the way for the numerous arial shows we see every Sunday. Yes we still see some great defenses around the league but realistically what the Seahawks did last year was the exception to the recent trend.

    Call this an excuse or a reason but it is realistic that an old dog like BB has had trouble slowing down QB's in a new era of football. Is this a more reasonable opinion then BB suddenly forgot how to acquire defensive talent? Could it perhaps be that the players he selects especially D backs are outdated and no longer efficient in this new era of football?

    Read the article below and notice how the year the rule was "re-emphasized" was the year that Polian's own QB broke the 20 year old passing record which has now been broken 4 times over by Tom, Brees, and PM again. 

     

     

     

    A brief, fact-filled history of the NFL passing game
    Cold, Hard Football Facts for May 31, 2010


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    (Ed. note: This CHFF classic originally ran on Nov. 25, 2008. It was honored by the Pro Football Writers of America before Super Bowl XLIV as one of the top stories of the 2008-09 football season. So it's got that going for it. Otherwise, it's just your run-of-the-mill educational filler here in the depths of the off-season.)

    By Kerry J. Byrne
    Cold, Hard Football Facts golden goose

    Quarterbacks Matt Cassel and Matt Ryan were two of the big surprises of the 2008 season.

    They're also the poster children for the Golden Age of the Passing Game, guys who have stepped into the role of starting NFL quarterback with no pro experience and played like seasoned old veterans of yore.

    Cassel had (now famously) not started a game since his high-school finale back in 1999, and threw for just 46 yards that day. Yet he's passed for 400 and 415 yards in his past two NFL games and boasts a 90.5 passer rating this season.

    Ryan's numbers are gaudy for a 23-year-old kid with 11 pro games under his belt: He's completed 60 percent of his passes for 2,418 yards, 7.8 yards per attempt and an 88.3 passer rating – all on a team that was a miserable 4-12 last year and boasts a first-year NFL head coach.

    It's a far cry from the traditional coming-of-age story for NFL quarterbacks, who were expected to struggle for years while they adapted to the speed and picked up on the intricacies of the pro game.

    But it's also no suprise: after all, the game itself has changed dramatically over the decades, and those changes have only accelerated in recent years, making it easier than ever to pass the ball and easier than ever for new quarterbacks to have an immediate impact on their team.

    In fact, the passing game is flourishing everywhere here in 2008, with the league's more experienced passers poised to rewrite the record books in several different categories.

    This year alone, not one but two players (Drew Brees and Kurt Warner) might surpass Dan Marino's single-season record of 5,084 passing yards. Ageless warhorse Brett Favre, meanwhile, has completed 70.61 percent of his passes, which puts him on pace to break the single-season record set by Ken Anderson in 1982 (70.55 percent). Jeff Garcia (69.76) and Warner (69.75) also have a shot to remake the completion percentage record.

    So what gives?

    Well, we haven't reached this era of prolific passing overnight. NFL rulemakers, not to mention offensive innovators, have been conspiring for decades to make it possible for quarterbacks to play as well as they do today. Quite frankly, most of the performances we're witnessing here in 2008 would not have been possible 30, 20 or even 10 years ago.

    In fact, if you want to see how much the game has changed over the decades, and how easy it is for quarterbacks today, follow our brief, annotated history of the NFL passing game, from the Stone Age to the Golden Age.

    The Stone Age (1920-1939)
    The NFL's offensive Stone Age was marked by two key traits:
    One, teams rarely passed.
    Two, there was no quarterback position as we know it today: that is, there was no player designated as both the primary signal caller and the primary passer.
    Back then, any player in the offensive backfield might have been called upon to pass the ball – and then only rarely. In 1932, the first year for which the NFL has passing stats, Green Bay Hall of Fame back Arnie Herber led the league in almost every passing category: completing 37 of 101 passes for 639 yards and 9 TDs in 14 games – about three games worth of work by today's standards.

    If you're looking for a game that defined the Stone Age, look at the very first NFL championship game in 1933.

    The Bears bested the Giants that day, 23-21, behind the heroics of Bronko Nagurski (pictured here). History remembers Nagurski as the all-purpose legend who's in the Hall of Fame for his exploits as a bruising running back, offensive tackle and defensive stud.

    But on this day, it was his two touchdown passes that carried Chicago to victory. A two-TD day through the air was no small feat in 1933. After all, the Bears attempted just three passes the entire game.

    The T Revolution (1940-49)
    Offensive football began to take the shape we'd recognize today in 1940, with the advent of the T formation, a brand of football adapted from the college game. The T formation did two things:
    One, it put one player behind center.
    Two, it called on that player to handle the team's passing duties.
    The T formation exploded onto the scene in the 1940 NFL championship game, when the Bears used it to crush the Redskins, 73-0, in the greatest blowout in NFL history.

    In the skillful hands of Bears quarterback Sid Luckman, a former college halfback, the advantages of the T formation were apparent, though not everybody adopted it right away. As late as 1946, the NFL still produced all-purpose two-way players like Hall of Famer Bill Dudley, who led the Steelers that year in rushing, passing, punting, kicking, punt returning, kick returning, scoring, interceptions and fumble recoveries. Whew!

    It even took football terminology a while to catch up with the on-field revolution: Washington's Slingin' Sammy Baugh (pictured here) is remembered as one of the great passers in NFL history and one of the first great quarterbacks. But newspapers of the day often referred to him as a halfback – his traditional position (he even work a halfback's number, 33).

    Teams during the T Revolution began to pass the ball much more often, and with much greater effect. Baugh completed 70.3 percent of his passes in 1945, a mark surpassed only once since, and toyed with the first 3,000-yard passing season in 1947 (2,938 yards) – more than doubling the greatest output of the 1930s (Philadelphia back Davey O'Brien passed for a then-record 1,324 yards in 1939).

    The Classical Age (1950-1977)
    Three major changes propelled the passing game forward in the 1950s:
    One, every team by this decade had designated the quarterback as the primary passer and signal caller.
    Two, the NFL adopted free substitution in 1950, leading to the two-platoon system. Quarterbacks no longer had to play defense, and could therefore concentrate on refining their passing skills.
    Three, the NFL in 1950 welcomed into the fold the Cleveland Browns (who previously played in the AAFC), along with the organization's patriarch, Paul Brown (pictured here with Otto Graham), whose offensive mind continues to dominate pro football today, 17 years after his death.
    The passing game in this era was defined by a downfield, attacking style used to stretch defenses vertically. Completion percentages and passer ratings were very low. Yards per attempt and interceptions were very high.

    Cleveland quarterback Otto Graham is probably the definitive player of the era. He led the Browns to six straight NFL championship games from 1950 to 1955 (winning three of them) and his career average of 8.63 yards per pass attempt remains the highest mark in NFL history. But he rarely completed more than 55 percent of his passes in a season, and he often threw more picks than TDs.

    But as defenses grew bigger, faster and stronger, and the game grew more violent, it became increasingly difficult to get the ball down field. By 1977, passer ratings, and scoring itself, had plummeted to lows not seen in decades.

    The league-wide passer rating in 1977 was 60.7 – barely better than the 60.0 of 1948. The 1977 season also produced the best defense (Atlanta, 9.2 PPG) and the worst offense (Tampa, 7.4 PPG) of the past 40 years.

    The passing game was dying, and the NFL and the architects of offensive football were forced to make major changes to save it.

    The Modern Age (1978-2003)
    Two major events launched NFL offenses into the Modern Age:
    One, the NFL instituted wholesale rule changes to open up offense in 1978. Primarily, defenders could no longer rough up receivers beyond 5 yards of the line of scrimmage, while offensive linemen were allowed to extend their arms and use their hands in pass blocking.
    Two, the tandem of Joe Montana (pictured here) and Bill Walsh, a Paul Brown disciple, found each other in 1979.
    The net result of the rule changes was that teams suddenly began passing the ball far more often and far more effectively. Passing attempts, passing yards and passing TDs skyrocketed in the early 1980s. Perhaps most notably, Dan Marino (who played for another Brown disciple, Don Shula) rewrote the record books with his 5,084 passing yards and 48 TDs in 1984.

    His numbers were Ruthian in their scope, literally unimaginable just seven years earlier: Back in 1977, Buffalo quarterback Joe Ferguson led the NFL with 2,803 passing yards while another Miami Hall of Famer, Bob Griese, topped the league with 22 TD tosses.

    The Walsh-Montana style of offense, meanwhile, dramatically changed the way teams attacked defenses. Instead of the aggressive, downfield style favored in the Classical Age, Walsh's 49ers began utilizing a high-percentage, low-risk passing attack that most people today know as the West Coast offense. And they did it with great effect, as the 49ers won five Super Bowls in a 14-year period with two different coaches and two different quarterbacks: Steve Young, who's No. 1 all time in passer rating (96.8) and Montana, who's No. 5 all time (92.3).

    Teams around the league quickly followed suit, as they did with Chicago's T formation four decades earlier. Everybody today (perhaps with the exception of the Raiders) utilizes a short, high-percentage, low-risk passing attack. As a result, yards per attempt have declined from their highs in the 1950s and 1960s, but so have the number of interceptions.

    Completion percentages and passer ratings have skyrocketed, meanwhile, to the point that every single player in the top 20 all-time in passer rating has joined the league in the Modern Age (since 1979). Fifteen of those 20 are still active here in ...

    The Golden Age (2004-present)
    As if quarterbacks hadn't been coddled enough by coaches and rulemakers over the past two decades, one profound game, and one very angry team executive, made their lives even easier in 2004.
    One, New England defenders pushed the bounds of pass interference rules in the 2003 AFC championship game, badly roughing up Indianapolis receivers and shutting down the Colts high-powered offense in a 24-14 Patriots victory.
    Two, Indy's powerful president, Bill Polian, complained to the league rather loudly in the wake of his team's loss.
    As a result, the NFL determined that its officials would "re-emphasize" pass interference rules in 2004 and beyond. Though not officially a rule change, the impact on the passing game was profound.

    The very next season, Indy quarterback Peyton Manning (pictured here) went out and rewrote the record books, with 49 TD passes and a 121.1 passer rating that was nearly 10 points better than any that had come before it. The league-wide passer rating, meanwhile, jumped from 78.3 in 2003 to a record 82.8 in 2004.

    The records have remained under assault since then: Tom Brady broke Manning's TD-toss record with 50 in 2007, while posting the second-highest passer rating in history (117.2). With less fanfare, Drew Brees set a record with 440 completions in 2007. And, as noted above, NFL quarterbacks are poised to rewrite the record books in countless categories here in 2008, while newcomers have bucked tradition by easily performing at high level.

    But today's high-flying newcomers and record-setting veterans aren't better quarterbacks than players of the past. They just have advantages their predecessors never enjoyed back before the Golden Age of the passing game.

     




     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsEng. Show PatsEng's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    Wait did True just criticize BB? I have to reread this 50 times, True is saying that BB isn't adjusting to the game and that maybe his picks are outdated for this new style of play...... So True is doing essentially what he gets on us for, saying BB needs to update his system and adjust his drafting approach....... Seriously True I'm half way expecting you to quote yourself and make some snide remark about writing BB an email because you think you know better.


    I swear by lil 10 pound bearded baby Jesus

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from TrueChamp. Show TrueChamp's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    In response to PatsEng's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Wait did True just criticize BB? I have to reread this 50 times, True is saying that BB isn't adjusting to the game and that maybe his picks are outdated for this new style of play...... So True is doing essentially what he gets on us for, saying BB needs to update his system and adjust his drafting approach....... Seriously True I'm half way expecting you to quote yourself and make some snide remark about writing BB an email because you think you know better.


    I swear by lil 10 pound bearded baby Jesus

    [/QUOTE]


    [object HTMLDivElement]

    You've actually never been able to comprehend anything I say because you are too busy criticizing BB's team building skills while overvaluing your own unsubstantiated opinions. 

    I criticize (within reason) many things BB does as I am just a fan like you and cannot comprehend why he does certain things. In the end I am just a spoiled Patriots fan, drunk off the fruits of BB's labor. You are as well, except that you actually think BB is making mistakes and could improve on his success, which is completely ignorant in every sense of the word...in my humble opinion of course.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsEng. Show PatsEng's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to PatsEng's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Wait did True just criticize BB? I have to reread this 50 times, True is saying that BB isn't adjusting to the game and that maybe his picks are outdated for this new style of play...... So True is doing essentially what he gets on us for, saying BB needs to update his system and adjust his drafting approach....... Seriously True I'm half way expecting you to quote yourself and make some snide remark about writing BB an email because you think you know better.


    I swear by lil 10 pound bearded baby Jesus

    [/QUOTE]


    [object HTMLDivElement]

    You've actually never been able to comprehend anything I say because you are too busy criticizing BB's team building skills while overvaluing your own unsubstantiated opinions. 

    I criticize (within reason) many things BB does as I am just a fan like you and cannot comprehend why he does certain things. In the end I am just a spoiled Patriots fan, drunk off the fruits of BB's labor. You are as well, except that you actually think BB is making mistakes and could improve on his success, which is completely ignorant in every sense of the word...in my humble opinion of course.

    [/QUOTE]


    [object HTMLDivElement]

    Not being able to comprehend says the man who thinks all I do is criticize BB's moves while glancing over the fact that I agree with a lot of BB's moves! There is no difference between what I say and what you said above. But, you must feel you're so gifted your opinion is the only one that matters while anyone else who makes criticism is wrong. Talk about being a hypocrite. Btw, even BB has said he could have done things better and strives to do things better. The only ignorant thing is making fun of those who see mistakes not want to be repeated when BB himself has said that you can't repeat the mistakes of the past if you hope to succeed. Not to mention there is always room for improvement. That's why they go through the things like FA and the draft in order to improve. Only spoiled fans are happy to sit back and count the numbers from past successes, winners look forward to the future and how to be better.

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from Footballexpert45. Show Footballexpert45's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    The defense has sucked because of very poor drafting, plain and simple.  The Pats have finally got it right by ponying up the $$ for Revis who I believe is another a completely different level than Talib.  Talib is good, Revis is one of the best ever.  The Pats should be more aggressive this season in the Pass rush with "Revis island".

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from tcal2-. Show tcal2-'s posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    I'm not going to blame the players

    or

    The coach who coaches the defensive players

    or

    the guy who put this grouping together.

    I Blame Tom F***ing Brady for leaving the field in 2 Super Bowls and not spotting the derfense a greater than 7 point lead in either.  The guy clearly sucks and has been washed up since 2004.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from mthurl. Show mthurl's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to PatsEng's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Wait did True just criticize BB? I have to reread this 50 times, True is saying that BB isn't adjusting to the game and that maybe his picks are outdated for this new style of play...... So True is doing essentially what he gets on us for, saying BB needs to update his system and adjust his drafting approach....... Seriously True I'm half way expecting you to quote yourself and make some snide remark about writing BB an email because you think you know better.


    I swear by lil 10 pound bearded baby Jesus

    [/QUOTE]


    [object HTMLDivElement]

    You've actually never been able to comprehend anything I say because you are too busy criticizing BB's team building skills while overvaluing your own unsubstantiated opinions. 

    I criticize (within reason) many things BB does as I am just a fan like you and cannot comprehend why he does certain things. In the end I am just a spoiled Patriots fan, drunk off the fruits of BB's labor. You are as well, except that you actually think BB is making mistakes and could improve on his success, which is completely ignorant in every sense of the word...in my humble opinion of course.

    [/QUOTE]


    Let me guess what you wrote without actually reading it! You are spoiled. You are ungrateful. You don't have a right to an opinion because you are spoiled. BB is a great team builder because he's won so much, it has nothing to do with Tom Brady...it's guys like Patrick Chung.

    Am I close? 

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from Footballexpert45. Show Footballexpert45's posts

    Re: Sums Up The Defense

    In response to mthurl's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to TrueChamp's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to PatsEng's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Wait did True just criticize BB? I have to reread this 50 times, True is saying that BB isn't adjusting to the game and that maybe his picks are outdated for this new style of play...... So True is doing essentially what he gets on us for, saying BB needs to update his system and adjust his drafting approach....... Seriously True I'm half way expecting you to quote yourself and make some snide remark about writing BB an email because you think you know better.


    I swear by lil 10 pound bearded baby Jesus

    [/QUOTE]


    [object HTMLDivElement]

    You've actually never been able to comprehend anything I say because you are too busy criticizing BB's team building skills while overvaluing your own unsubstantiated opinions. 

    I criticize (within reason) many things BB does as I am just a fan like you and cannot comprehend why he does certain things. In the end I am just a spoiled Patriots fan, drunk off the fruits of BB's labor. You are as well, except that you actually think BB is making mistakes and could improve on his success, which is completely ignorant in every sense of the word...in my humble opinion of course.

    [/QUOTE]


    Let me guess what you wrote without actually reading it! You are spoiled. You are ungrateful. You don't have a right to an opinion because you are spoiled. BB is a great team builder because he's won so much, it has nothing to do with Tom Brady...it's guys like Patrick Chung.

    Am I close? 

    [/QUOTE]

    Patrick Chung reminds me too much of Eugene Chung.

     
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