The Blessing of Riley Cooper

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    The Blessing of Riley Cooper

    The Riley Cooper Incident may be a Godsend in disguise. Hopefully, it forces all NFL teams to examine not only the issue of race but also domestic violence and other troubling issues. As a society we seem to take our cues from sports, particularly the NFL. If the NFL addresses these issues on a team by team basis (not just the Eagles), the fans will also take heed. We all need to examine our own racial and gender biases that have been bred into us.

    Racism and Domestic Violence are huge issues that have affected all of us. We need to start by being honest about it and facing up to it. It is only by acknowleding the pernicious effects of these issues we can begin to transcend them. 

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from p-mike. Show p-mike's posts

    Re: The Blessing of Riley Cooper

    Of course, the dirty little secret is that a very specific (and powerful) segment of our society likes racism right where it is, thank you very much.

    Now, this guy obviously has some issues -- an apparent propensity for over-indulgence not least among them -- but when I see once-respected media outlets injecting racism where it isn't to incite the kind of people who thrive on its very existence (and all of this for the simple expedient of manufacturing a crisis where none should exist in order to generate . . .   you guessed it . . .  $$$$$ ), well, I just don't get all that excited over some guy who drank too much and said exactly what he thought.

    It's unfortunate that we live in an age where the social attention span is about six seconds and everybody is walking around with a video camera (and the ineternet) in their pocket, but you're not going to make any hay against racism with "sensitivity training," and you're certainly not going to eliminate the casual use of offensive language when you want to keep it for yourself but deny it to everyone else.

     

     

     

    Now you listen here! He's not the Messiah . . .   he's a very naughty boy!



     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from NYC. Show NYC's posts

    Re: The Blessing of Riley Cooper

    In response to russgriswold's comment:

    How about just cut the guy already?  What an awkward situation.   This is the equivalent of a black guy using racial slurs againsts whites out in public as an NHL player. 

    The "counseling session" crap is a farce, too.  Adults with college degrees shouldn't need counseling to have a basic respect for other people they're around.

     



    Rusty

    The issue is a lot bigger than Riley Cooper. Sure, the easy thing is just to cut him and pretend that no one else has the issue. The reality is the issues of race and domestic violence are pervasive. The NFL now has the ability to be a powerful social force in society and to advocate for changes. If each team were to take on these issues, discuss them and bring them out into the open it would act as a model for us as individuals to do the same. 

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Not-A-Shot. Show Not-A-Shot's posts

    Re: The Blessing of Riley Cooper

    In response to NYC's comment:

     As a society we seem to take our cues from sports, particularly the NFL.



    I don't know what society you live in, but the one I live in doesn't submerge itself in violence, drugs, and cheating...and looking the other way.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Not-A-Shot. Show Not-A-Shot's posts

    Re: The Blessing of Riley Cooper

    In response to NYC's comment:

    The issue is a lot bigger than Riley Cooper. Sure, the easy thing is just to cut him and pretend that no one else has the issue. The reality is the issues of race and domestic violence are pervasive. The NFL now has the ability to be a powerful social force in society and to advocate for changes. If each team were to take on these issues, discuss them and bring them out into the open it would act as a model for us as individuals to do the same. 



    Most people don't watch NFL football.  No matter what happens in the league, it will not be a powerful social force in anything.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from TFB12. Show TFB12's posts

    Re: The Blessing of Riley Cooper

    Dr. Harry Edwards gets it.  The man has a voice of reason on this matter.  Love his take on the Riley Cooper situation.  Take a few minutes to listen to this interview with him.  Fantastic, imo!!

    http://www.nfl.com/videos/nfl-network-total-access/0ap2000000224772/Should-the-Eagles-keep-Riley-Cooper

     

    ---------------------------------------------

    "Being the best doesn't mean you always win. It just means you win more than anybody else."  Text received by Tom Brady from Kurt Warner after Ravens loss.


    view my Patriots photoshops at patsfanfotoshop.tumblr.com





     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Muzwell. Show Muzwell's posts

    Re: The Blessing of Riley Cooper

    Yeah, I don't think it will mean squat to race relations. Just one marginal player's career is probably toast.

    What's the domestic violence angle here? Did he beat his woman too?

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from NYC. Show NYC's posts

    Re: The Blessing of Riley Cooper

    In response to Not-A-Shot's comment:

     

    In response to NYC's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    The issue is a lot bigger than Riley Cooper. Sure, the easy thing is just to cut him and pretend that no one else has the issue. The reality is the issues of race and domestic violence are pervasive. The NFL now has the ability to be a powerful social force in society and to advocate for changes. If each team were to take on these issues, discuss them and bring them out into the open it would act as a model for us as individuals to do the same. 

     

     



    Most people don't watch NFL football.  No matter what happens in the league, it will not be a powerful social force in anything

     

    On an international basis sports dominates TV and the NFL dominates all sports. NFL teams have fans even in small towns in France and in the USA the Superbowl is second only to Thanksgiving in being a family celebrations holiday.

    People take their cues from how the league handles situations and how players behave. Rightly or wrongly, sports viewing has a social impact greater than the effect of most established religion. What the league legislates and how teams handle situations effects how ordinary citizens will handle them. If the people see teams disciplining domestic violence or racism and offering players aternatives to cope with it, they will take as an example that they can do the same.   



     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from p-mike. Show p-mike's posts

    Re: The Blessing of Riley Cooper

    In response to NYC's comment:

    . . . in the USA the Superbowl is second only to Thanksgiving in being a family celebrations holiday.



    Santa Claus is not going to be happy to hear about this.

     

     

     
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  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Philskiw1. Show Philskiw1's posts

    Re: The Blessing of Riley Cooper

    In response to p-mike's comment:

    In response to NYC's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    . . . in the USA the Superbowl is second only to Thanksgiving in being a family celebrations holiday.

     



    Santa Claus is not going to be happy to hear about this.

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Man you know how mad my mom gets too.  God rest the worlds soul when she dies!

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Not-A-Shot. Show Not-A-Shot's posts

    Re: The Blessing of Riley Cooper

    In response to NYC's comment:

    On an international basis sports dominates TV and the NFL dominates all sports. NFL teams have fans even in small towns in France and in the USA the Superbowl is second only to Thanksgiving in being a family celebrations holiday.

    People take their cues from how the league handles situations and how players behave. Rightly or wrongly, sports viewing has a social impact greater than the effect of most established religion. What the league legislates and how teams handle situations effects how ordinary citizens will handle them. If the people see teams disciplining domestic violence or racism and offering players aternatives to cope with it, they will take as an example that they can do the same.   



    Can you offer some examples of how NFL policies or actions have had an effect on society?

    (Hint:  No.)

    I'm going to guess that the Catholic Church and/or the Islamic religion has a larger impact on the people of the world than the NFL does.  Typing that out made me realize the absurdity of this discussion.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Not-A-Shot. Show Not-A-Shot's posts

    Re: The Blessing of Riley Cooper

    In response to APpats21's comment:



    Soccer dominates all sports. It's the most popular sport in the world.



    Yes, but apparently, the NFL sets policy.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from NYC. Show NYC's posts

    Re: The Blessing of Riley Cooper

    In response to Not-A-Shot's comment:

    In response to NYC's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    On an international basis sports dominates TV and the NFL dominates all sports. NFL teams have fans even in small towns in France and in the USA the Superbowl is second only to Thanksgiving in being a family celebrations holiday.

    People take their cues from how the league handles situations and how players behave. Rightly or wrongly, sports viewing has a social impact greater than the effect of most established religion. What the league legislates and how teams handle situations effects how ordinary citizens will handle them. If the people see teams disciplining domestic violence or racism and offering players aternatives to cope with it, they will take as an example that they can do the same.   

     



    Can you offer some examples of how NFL policies or actions have had an effect on society?

     

    (Hint:  No.)

    I'm going to guess that the Catholic Church and/or the Islamic religion has a larger impact on the people of the world than the NFL does.  Typing that out made me realize the absurdity of this discussion.

    [/QUOTE]

    Not a Shot

    There was no doubt exageration in my statement that the NFL is more popular than religion. So, kudos to you for calling me on it and personally, I hope it is not the case. Regarding the NFL and social policy: take a look at a 1960's sociology classic: The Medium is the Message by Marshall McLuhan. McLuhan thesis: Media (TV) dominates thought, behavior and action. 

    The NFL is the ultimate medium for TV: Aggressive behavior channelled for the social purpose of entertainment and tribal vindication. What is more captivating than that? Isn't that why the NFL is dominating ratings? Soccer may be played in more countries but it does not match the NFL for drama. No one gets hit on purpose in soccer and NFL players get themselves in more trouble percentage wise than any other sport. (Providing more drama)  

    Furthermore, we now have a commissioner who wants to shape the message albeit for the purpose higher TV ratings and more advertising dollars for the league. Goodell has put himself into the role of being a social force and the fans like it. When Micheal Vick was suspended and sent to jail for abusing animals it was Goodell who was behind it. And Vick repented and has become an animal rights activist who is helpling to shape policy and greater social awareness of the rights of animals. 

     

     

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