Too much business, too little heart

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from crasian. Show crasian's posts

    Re: Too much business, too little heart

    In Response to Re: Too much business, too little heart:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Too much business, too little heart : I keep reading posts about Bruschi, Vrable and Seymour. Bruschi is 36, Vrabel is 34, Seymour is 29. The Pats kept Bruschi, Vrable and now Thomas well into thier 30s. This has nothing to do with "old defense" getting younger. We just signed Burgess and everyone was all excited. How old is Burgess? A - 31 - two years older than Seymour. Serymour held out and wants the big money. This is not about getting old, losing a step, need for a change, etc. This is about dollars and sense. I am disappointed, disheartened, but Seymour held out when it was a business for him.
    Posted by One-If-By-Sea[/QUOTE]
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from crasian. Show crasian's posts

    Re: Too much business, too little heart

    All good points about Vrable and Bruschi. But, Richard heading towards 30 has not been as durable as these guys have been over the last 3 years. Bruschi probably played more time after his stroke than Seymour. He will be certainly looking to break the bank one last time and rightfully so. But I certainly don't want the Patriots to be the ones paying him over 12 million a season when he's 34 years old . Timing is bad, the deal is good. No one is saying he wasn't an all-pro! 
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from nykrb. Show nykrb's posts

    Re: Too much business, too little heart

    You can't have it BOTH ways...

    You can't hang onto players who are well past their prime (IE like they did with Harrison and Bruschi in 2008) and field a winning team.

    They hung onto too many older fan favorites last season, and the Defense suffered because of it.

    They didn't really draft for the Defense in 2006 and 2007, they went into those years with 35 year old Harrison, Bruschi and 39 year old Junior, and both seasons the Defense faltered making them fall just short of SB #4 both seasons, because the Patriots failed to draft young Defensive studs, and clung to old and injury prone veterans and had no solid young talent backing them up.

    If you want to stay on top, you have to let go of your great players a year or two BEFORE they drastically decline, not afterwards, unless you have their replacements already on the roster and getting plenty of game time... and if thats the case, you are overpaying for a player who is not a legitimate starter anymore.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from krismk. Show krismk's posts

    Re: Too much business, too little heart

    Peter King reported a good anecdote today about the Bengals finally signing their hold-out 1st rd pick.  His agent shook his hand upon signing the contract, saying something to the effect of, 'congratulations for becoming a multi-millionaire', not a welcome to the NFL or to the Bengals.  The 1st rd pick promptly reported out-of-shape, and injured his foot...taking his fat-az and money to the IR for the season.

    That's the business right now.  As a fan, I liked Seymour, but he was highly paid for what he did....he performed and was lavishly rewarded for his performance.

    Past performance is no guarantee of future earnings.....isn't that the language the REAL world has become used to before getting screwed?
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from underdogg. Show underdogg's posts

    Re: Too much business, too little heart

    In Response to Too much business, too little heart:
    [QUOTE]Im a Pats fan and I have been for years. However, I think the way they treat great players who have served the organisations for years and even won Super Bowls for them, is too business-like and too cold. What makes a classy organisations is not just how much they win, but also how they take care of their own heroes. Sey and Vrabel both deserved better endings in NE, but instead they were send away like common average players. I think Pats will lose a lot of fans if they keep focusing solely on the business side. People are sports fans with their hearts, their emotions and their souls - and they love their great players. Its the heroes (=players) who makes the stunning plays people want to see and remember. Fans love their heroes and they want their organisation to treat them right. What keeps the NFL running is the emotions and hearts of their fans - not the strategies and business plans!
    Posted by haldager[/QUOTE]

    Don't take any of these people too seriously.  They have all of the heart in the world when it fits. 
     

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