2012 Options

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from notin. Show notin's posts

    2012 Options

    I can only make so many anti-Valentine posts.

    For 2013, the Sox will need help at the following positions: SP, 1B, LF and SS.

    Candidates:

    SP (A brief overview of a slew of potential candidates, and reviewing them all would take way too much time. Here are some names chosen through the painstakingly difficult process of being scraped off the top of my head.)

    Felix Hernadez (trade). The pros are obvious (flat out awesome). As are the cons (will bankrupt the farm simply to keep Seattle from hanging up).

    Zack Greinke (free agent): Former Cy Young winner in AL with overblown anxiety issues. Struggling in AL right now over small sample size. Will be 29 and cost in excess of $100mill.

    Brandon McCarthy (free agent): Quietly solid career as a starter. Certainly not a topflight TOR, but a good pitcher representing a modest upgrade. Unlikely to cost excessively, and might not require 4-5 years. Legitimate health concerns,and likely to garner lots of attention from teams with smaller payrolls.

    Brett Anderson (trade): Slowly pricing himself out of Oakland. Still only 24 with legitimate TOR potential. Will not come cheaply in a trade, with package probably being better than one required to get former teammate Trevor Cahill but less than the one to acquire former teammate Gio Gonzalez.

    Francisco Liriano / Jake Peavy (free agent): Two off/on SPs from the White Sox capable of domination, and equally capable of massive DL stints interspersed with ineffectiveness. Peavy does have a $22mill option, but it is very likely to not get picked up.

    James Shields (trade?): In the likely event Tampa exercises the option, trading for Shields might be a tad difficult from Tampa. At least for Boston.

    Matt Garza (trade): With one season left and coming off injury, Garza did become easier to acquire. However, his ability going forward is in question.

    Jair Jurrjens (free agent or trade,pending arbitration tender): The Sox could move on Jurrjens, but he is extremely likely to be non-tendered. His effectiveness as a pitcher is about as questionable as can be, and any offer might be best served as the minor league variety that limits his potential role so “SP Depth.” Otherwise, he has more potential to be problem instead of solution.

    Jason Vargas (trade): Vargas is likely to be available via trade, but isn’t worth as much outside of Seattle, and his acquisition will cost unnecessarily and likely result in a streaky pitcher who is more off than on for Boston.

    Cliff Lee (trade): Lee is aging, owed a ton of cash ($87.5mill over 3 years of $102.5mill over 4), and might be costly to acquire as well. There is no actual indication the Phillies are eager to move him just yet, although they really should consider it.

     

    1B (no viable internal options except maybe Sands):

    Kevin Youkilis (free agent): Assuming Chicago does not pick up the option and Valentine is gone, Youkilis might be amenable to Boston again. Injuries are a legitimate concern, but defense and OBP remain the backbone of his skillset. He is no longer the hitter he was from 2008 through 2010, and unlikely to ever be again.

    Carlos Pena (free agent): Power, BB and defense. Also, lots of strikeouts and really, an overall moderate performer with the bat for his position. But his demands will certainly be reasonable.

    Kendrys Morales (tradeor free agent,pending arbitration tender): MLBTR thinks he is a non-tender candidate, which makes him easier to acquire. Realistically, he has yet to rediscover his offense, and his defense is suspect. Also, there is nothing on this planet that cannot hurt him. He can go on a prolonged DL stint after getting soapsuds in his eye. The Angels and their so-so bullpen might have interest in malcontent Aceves and/or question mark Bard, although Alfredos availability and desire to leave might be dependent on Valentines retention.

    Ryan Howard (trade): If the Phillies are removing salary, Howard (4 yrs $105mill or 5 yrs $118mill) is another serious candidate for trade, and really a bigger one to move than Lee.

    Dan Uggla (trade): An outsdie-the-box candidate owed $29mill over the next 3 years in Atl after posting a .743 OPS for the first two.  Patient hitter with Fenway swing and best left away from 2B.

     

    LF (beyond internal options Brentz and Sands)

    Justin Upton (trade): Would be awesome in Fenway, but will command a ransom. Most likely he goes to Texas in a trade centered on Elvis Andrus.

    Josh Willihgham (trade): Minnesota needs a lots of SP (Doubront?) and a few other things. Willingham is an OBP machine who has played in some of the worst parks for a RHH power hitter. He is cheap contractually, but not in trade value.

    Michael Morse (trade): Also could be a 1B candidate. RHH power bat with moderate on-base skills. Washington could make him available for a CF or the pieces to get one, and replace him with super-prospect Anthony Rendon. Morse does have two suspensions for PED in the minor league program.

    Josh Hamilton (free agent): Monster hitter with monster problems. A 4 or 5 year deal has serious potential for fun, but would probably not be long enough to interest him. A longer deal is a recipe for disaster.However, the Sox did free up a lot of cash, and unless they spend a lot, perception could be ownership is OK with a struggling team and a low payroll. Spending big alleviates that, and Hamilton is the biggest potential for spending around.

    Torii Hunter (free agent): Has indicated he would come to Boston, but hinted that his interest is contingent on David Ortiz being retained (which I think is a likely scenario). At 37, his best days as a player are behind him, although he still might be the most likable person in all of MLB.

    Alfonso Soriano / Vernon Wells (trade): Two awful deals that might be avialble for a lesser awful deal, like Lackey.  But I hope the Sox realize they need Lackey more than these two, and, thanks to a minimum wage year, might have actual trae appeal to other teams with a reasonble season. 

     

    SS (beyond internal options Iglesias,Ciriaco and DeJesus):

    Stephen Drew (free agent): Can hit and field when healthy, and should not be avoided solely because his brother was unnecessarily unpopular. Not a huge difference maker, but probably an overall upgrade over Iglesias, assuming he stays healthy.

    Yunel Escobar (trade): Good fielder and occasional hitter with alleged attitude issues. Toronto will probably be glad to dump him and move on to Adeiny Hechevarria.

    Hiruyoki Nakajima (free agent): Valentine favorite, but that might be irrelevant. Will not require posting. Actual abilities unknown to me.

    Jhonny Peralta (trade or free agent,pending option): If, for some reason, Detroit declines his option, he would be a very nice fit for Fenway. However, he is unlikely to be available so easily and trading for him figures to be difficult, especially given the lack of middle infield talent in Detroit.

     

    There are, as always other candidates. This is the preliminary look at external options. I would expct at least one of the 3 non-pitcher position to be filled internally, with shortstop topping the list as the most likely. The Sox also potentially have a need at DH, but as of today, I expect Ortiz to return for at least one, if not two more seasons…

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from GoUconn13. Show GoUconn13's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    Biggest problem is that everyone need pitchings.   So therefore there will be multiple teams that may be willing to unloaded thier farm system to get Felix or Garza or Jurrijen or others. If Boston ever get Felix, they may not ever make another trade afterward.  

    All the players above, half of them are via trade.  Heck no way that Boston could make at least three or more trades to get these top players.  

    Also why the world Seattle or Oakland are willing to unloaded their pitching staffs if they are on a hot roll right now.  They can see themselves to have a good year next year.   

    Another thing is that Boston is going to stay away from bad contract such as Well, Soriano, etc.  If Boston have kept Crawford, or Beckett, they could have trade one of them for another bad contract.  But since they are gone, Boston no longer have anyone that have a bad contract except Lackey.  I would keep Lackey for now cuz lack of talent pitchings on the market during the off season are all terrible ones.  

    Right now, Boston should keep Lackey, Lester and Bucholtz.  Doubront is still needed to be evualated.  He had surgery, and now he have a tired arm.  Is he really going to be able to pitch a whole season for every season in the next many years?  That is what Boston need to look at.  Need pitchers like Tampa Bay's pitcher (Shield, Price, and others) who can pitch from day one to the post season!!
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    Nice thoughtful list, notin. I think the Sox will make one big trade (Upton or B. Anderson) and sign a couple mid-level FAs (McCarthy , Nakajima, Marcum, and Ross).
     
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  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    Maybe Longoria in the line-up makes everyone else better... 

    The last 28 days:
    Upton  .942

    Kepp   .917
    Jenn    .903
    Zobr    .901

    The Tampa Bay Rays will not go away!
     
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  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    In response to bobbysu's comment:

    Great Pitching does 2 things, ALWAYS keeps you in games, (very rarely do you get blown out), 1 swing of the bat and you could win.
    2nd and most important, dont have long losing streaks.
    You never know how the Offense will be day to day, week to week.



    Exactly, and that is why a team with bad offense and great pitching usually wins more than a team with bad pitching and great hitting. When the scores are low, you are "in" more games.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Alibiike. Show Alibiike's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    "I can only make so many anti-Valentine posts"

    Quitting? You were doing so well too. You and Danny boy were on track to 10,000 whining about BV.
    Throw in JB and that completes the three. Larry, Moe, and Curly!
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from maxbialystock. Show maxbialystock's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    The OP missed the first two moves for 2013--re-signing Ortiz and Ross.  After them, get more one bat for the OF or 1B. 

    The biggest issue is the rotation, but that is, as others have aid, the big issue for many teams, so the competition will be heavy.  Maybe the real fix is a year or two away. 

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from modod. Show modod's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    Why do I get the feeling they will not make any big move. Instead they will look at another year of maturing for Doubront, see if Tazawa is ready and add those two to Buchholz, Lester, and Lackey. Then pick up some inexpensive arms for the pen, sign Ross for LF, Kalish in RF, Pods as 4th OF, and a pickup for 1B (Sweeney?). I suspect they realize they cannot turn it around in one winter no matter how much they have to spend.

    Then make more of a move next trading deadline or winter. 
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from rightymclefty. Show rightymclefty's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    The Sox have to make offseason moves, just to keep TV ratings and some buzz going.
    I like Justin Morneau a hell of a lot better than any of the bunch Notin mentioned, except Howard.
    He's not a free agent, but I doubt he's be expensive to trade for.
    Ryan Howard? Intriguing. He has the left field stroke from the left side. If he comes back to form, there's your big bopper in the middle of the lineup.
    Michael Morse has unreal power, and hits for average. Morales can hit, too, but looks like he needs to get into shape. Can't see LA parting with Trumbo, who would be awesome in Fenway.
    Can't see Kalish as a starter. If he is, this team has real problems.
    No powers Sweeney at 1st? You're kidding, right?
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from royf19. Show royf19's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    If next year is definitely a rebuilding year, I'd look in-house first. I think Bentz certainly is a candidate for the OF. I know I'm jumping the gun because I normally don't advocate rushing players, but I'd consider Bogarts too. He's still probably a year away but there's nothing to say a 20-year-old can't play.

    I wouldn't give up on Kalish. Considering he was coming bck from injury, he probably should have stayed down in Pawtucket. Send him to winter ball and see what happens.

    After blowing up the team like they did, I wouldn't now turn around and bring in a bunch of retreads or guys with issues. Why would you bring in a headcase like Upton if the clubhouse culture supposedly needs improvement.

    As for 1B, I'd seriously consider Youk. I'm not sure there's a lot of options out there, so who knows.

    As for starting pitching, I don't think it's in as bad of shape as people think. I really do think Lester will bounce back. He was consistent for four years and got off to a decent start this year -- 3.94 ERA after nine starts -- before having issues. And Buchholz has gotten better since overcoming the injury. And I still think Lackey could be a comeback candidate. A lot of guys bounce back strong after Tommy John. And we might not like his personality or his contract, but remember, the guy did go out and pitch all last year with the bum elbow.

    Beyond that -- let's take a hard look at whether or not Doubront is an answer at the back end and if any of the guys the Sox got in the Dodgers trade could be ready. Just like I was wary of signing a 31-year-old Lackey, I'm wary of signing a 31-year-old Shields who had an off year in 2009, a horrible year in 2010 before turning it around with a career year in 2011. This year, his ERA is a run higher than last year although 3.88 is still good. However, he was below average (4.52 ERA) through July 26, so the ERA now is because of a string of seven strong starts.

    There's no doubt that there are tough decisions to be made going forward.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from hill55. Show hill55's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    The Oakland Athletics can afford Brett Anderson at $5.5 million in 2013 and at a net $6.5 million in 2014, so I doubt the lefthander is going anywhere.

    Because of his age and better control, Anderson would command a stiffer return than former teammate Gio Gonzalez.

    Even if the lefthanders offered similar value, the Red Sox would be hard-pressed to match the package the Washington Nationals surrendered for Gonzalez (and righthander Robert Gilliam): 24-year-old righthander Brad Peacock, Baseball America's 36th-ranked prospect entering the season; 20-year-old righthander A.J. Cole, BA's 57th-ranked prospect; 23-year-old catcher Derek Norris, BA's 38th-ranked prospect in 2010 and 72nd-ranked prospect in 2011; and 25-year-old lefthander Tommy Millone, who has posted an ERA of 3.94 in 26 starts this year.
     
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  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from notin. Show notin's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    In response to GoUconn13s comment:

    Biggest problem is that everyone need pitchings.   So therefore there will be multiple teams that may be willing to unloaded thier farm system to get Felix or Garza or Jurrijen or others. If Boston ever get Felix, they may not ever make another trade afterward.  

    All the players above, half of them are via trade.  Heck no way that Boston could make at least three or more trades to get these top players.  

    Also why the world Seattle or Oakland are willing to unloaded their pitching staffs if they are on a hot roll right now.  They can see themselves to have a good year next year.   

    Another thing is that Boston is going to stay away from bad contract such as Well, Soriano, etc.  If Boston have kept Crawford, or Beckett, they could have trade one of them for another bad contract.  But since they are gone, Boston no longer have anyone that have a bad contract except Lackey.  I would keep Lackey for now cuz lack of talent pitchings on the market during the off season are all terrible ones.  

    Right now, Boston should keep Lackey, Lester and Bucholtz.  Doubront is still needed to be evualated.  He had surgery, and now he have a tired arm.  Is he really going to be able to pitch a whole season for every season in the next many years?  That is what Boston need to look at.  Need pitchers like Tampa Bay's pitcher (Shield, Price, and others) who can pitch from day one to the post season!!



     

    I don’t see either Seattle or Oakland “unloading” their pitching staffs. I named 4 pitchers total from those two teams. McCarthy is one, and as he is a free agent after 2012, he will be available, and possibly quite well sought after. Hernandez was really only addressed because of the frequency everyone else mentions him, but was also described as ridiculously expensive (re: not likely to move). The other two, however, are likely to be available. Anderson is pitching well since coming off TJ, but his contract ($5.75mill in 2013, $8mill option for 2014 and $12mill option for 2015 each with a $1mill buyout) is certainly reaching the stages where Oakland moves pitchers. He will be available, just not cheaply. Vargas has one year left before free agency, and Seattle has numerous internal options to replace him (Hultzen, Walker, Paxton), so he certainly is a candidate for a trade.

    I hope Boston does stay away from Wells / Soriano, etc. However, if they feel the need to move Lackey, both are obvious candidates to trade him for. As I said, I prefer to hold Lackey over either, but I am not the GM.

    As a fan, I am hoping for Anderson, but I think Garza is much more likely.

    Offensively, I think Willingham or Upton represent exactly what the Sox need. However, both will be tough to trade for if they move on a pitcher as well. Uggla is unlikely, but is actually a younger, more expensive (and consequently more available) version of Willingham. A trade would require he change positions, which really, he should do anyway. (I think Atlanta might be very amenable to dealing Uggla and his 3 year / $39mill contract, since he has really only had one good –actually, amazing – month for them buried deep in two years of mediocrity.)

    I think they keep 4 starters, trade for a fifth, and hopefully add sufficient depth in the minors. Iglesias or Nakijima are the most likely shortstop candidates. 1B and LF remain the mystery, and its a safe bet at least one spot does go to a free agent for two reasons. (They only have so many trade pieces, and they do have to spend to avoid negative PR associated with low payrolls.) I do think they get involved in the Hamilton free agency, but hopefully don’t go overboard with the length of the deal and stick to 5 years as the longest offer, and even that might be too long…

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from notin. Show notin's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    The OP missed the first two moves for 2013--re-signing Ortiz and Ross.  After them, get more one bat for the OF or 1B. 

    The biggest issue is the rotation, but that is, as others have aid, the big issue for many teams, so the competition will be heavy.  Maybe the real fix is a year or two away. 

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Not really. I named Ortiz twice as likely to be retained. I do assume Ross will be back as well, part of the RF situation one way or another, whether as the starter or in some sort of unbalanced platoon with Sweeney or Kalish, with Ross probably playing at least 90 games instead of the 50-60 the RHH platoon player would normally get. But this is why RF was not listed as a position of need. Obviously, Ross might play LF, but that doesn’t change the need for a corner OF, and LF is easier to fill than RF, especially at Fenway

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from notin. Show notin's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    In response to rightymclefty's comment:

    The Sox have to make offseason moves, just to keep TV ratings and some buzz going.
    I like Justin Morneau a hell of a lot better than any of the bunch Notin mentioned, except Howard.
    He's not a free agent, but I doubt he's be expensive to trade for.
    Ryan Howard? Intriguing. He has the left field stroke from the left side. If he comes back to form, there's your big bopper in the middle of the lineup.
    Michael Morse has unreal power, and hits for average. Morales can hit, too, but looks like he needs to get into shape. Can't see LA parting with Trumbo, who would be awesome in Fenway.
    Can't see Kalish as a starter. If he is, this team has real problems.
    No powers Sweeney at 1st? You're kidding, right?



    Morneau is certainly another good candidate. At some point, I did have to stop naming names, and that is really the only reason to omit him. However, he probably would be easier to acquire than Willingham for reasons related to contracts. I also like the idea of dealing for Span and flipping him for Morse, which Washington might be on board with. (They have been linked to Span before.) Minnesota could be a decent trading partner for Boston if their demands are not unreasonable.

     

    I am not giving up on Kalish just yet, but I do doubt he is a starter unless Ellsbury is dealt, or if he works into a platoon with Ross. More likely, he could be some form of trade bait since Bradley could hopefully replace Ellsbury next season. Teams like Atlanta and Washington might have a place for him, too. I do disagree that making him a starter means the Sox have problems. Look who has been starting in CF for Washington this year (Ankiel, Bernardina), and they clearly do not have problems.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from notin. Show notin's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    In response to hill55s comment:

    The Oakland Athletics can afford Brett Anderson at $5.5 million in 2013 and at a net $6.5 million in 2014, so I doubt the lefthander is going anywhere.

    Because of his age and better control, Anderson would command a stiffer return than former teammate Gio Gonzalez.

    Even if the lefthanders offered similar value, the Red Sox would be hard-pressed to match the package the Washington Nationals surrendered for Gonzalez (and righthander Robert Gilliam): 24-year-old righthander Brad Peacock, Baseball Americas 36th-ranked prospect entering the season; 20-year-old righthander A.J. Cole, BAs 57th-ranked prospect; 23-year-old catcher Derek Norris, BAs 38th-ranked prospect in 2010 and 72nd-ranked prospect in 2011; and 25-year-old lefthander Tommy Millone, who has posted an ERA of 3.94 in 26 starts this year.



    BR.com has a slightly different value for Andersons deal - $5.75mill in 2013, $8mill option for 2014 and $12mill for 2015, the last 2 each with a $1.5mill buyout. Oakland could probably afford it, but they certainly have dealt pitchers making less, such as Gio Gonzalez. Gonzalez had 2 years of arbitration left to build on a modest $3.25mill salary, and would likely not have reached the $8mill figure in either season. Andy Bailey also made less and was dealt away by the As. Also Trevor Cahill, who is the same age as Anderson, had more control remaining, and was not coming off TJ surgery. Cahill signed a modest 6-year $30.5mill extension prior to being dealt (with Craig Breslow) for one ranked prospect (Jarrod Parker) coming off TJ surgery, a reliever (Ryan Cook) who was never ranked anywhere, and an undersized PCL wunderkind (Collin Cowgill) whose ceiling tops out as a fourth outfielder at best. Why is that deal not worth comparing to?

     

    Also, Derek Norris fell out of BAs ranking in 2012 after dropping 34 places. He was not exactly priming his trade value.

     

    I think Anderson will cost a lot, but is certainly worth looking into for Boston. Depending on what rankings you prefer, Boston will have the pieces. Its just a matter of whom they decide to move. One might hope they would have interest in Garin Cecchini (who Fangraphs had as the Sox third best prospect pre-2011), presently blocked at the MLB level by Middlebrooks, as the Athletics have very little in the way of 3B anywhere. The other pieces attached are up for debate, and would probably be more than I prefer to give, but that happens.

     
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  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    The Oakland Athletics can afford Brett Anderson at $5.5 million in 2013 and at a net $6.5 million in 2014, so I doubt the lefthander is going anywhere. 

    Because of his age and better control, Anderson would command a stiffer return than former teammate Gio Gonzalez. 

    Even if the lefthanders offered similar value, the Red Sox would be hard-pressed to match the package the Washington Nationals surrendered for Gonzalez (and righthander Robert Gilliam): 24-year-old righthander Brad Peacock, Baseball Americas 36th-ranked prospect entering the season; 20-year-old righthander A.J. Cole, BAs 57th-ranked prospect; 23-year-old catcher Derek Norris, BAs 38th-ranked prospect in 2010 and 72nd-ranked prospect in 2011; and 25-year-old lefthander Tommy Millone, who has posted an ERA of 3.94 in 26 starts this year.



    BR.com has a slightly different value for Andersons deal - $5.75mill in 2013, $8mill option for 2014 and $12mill for 2015, the last 2 each with a $1.5mill buyout. Oakland could probably afford it, but they certainly have dealt pitchers making less, such as Gio Gonzalez. Gonzalez had 2 years of arbitration left to build on a modest $3.25mill salary, and would likely not have reached the $8mill figure in either season. Andy Bailey also made less and was dealt away by the As. Also Trevor Cahill, who is the same age as Anderson, had more control remaining, and was not coming off TJ surgery. Cahill signed a modest 6-year $30.5mill extension prior to being dealt (with Craig Breslow) for one ranked prospect (Jarrod Parker) coming off TJ surgery, a reliever (Ryan Cook) who was never ranked anywhere, and an undersized PCL wunderkind (Collin Cowgill) whose ceiling tops out as a fourth outfielder at best. Why is that deal not worth comparing to?

    Bailey made less than $4M in arb this year, and I think that was the main reason they traded him when they did. Although Oakland is winning now, and may change their outlook planning, I do think they will be open to solid trade offers for Anderson. No, they won't give him away, but they have done pretty well without him for most of this year already.

     
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  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from Alibiike. Show Alibiike's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    In response to TrotterNixon's comment:

    The Red Sox need to stop slobbering over up years from SP on other teams. Unless there is a young superstar SP or a proven elite SP veteran on a short term contract, forget the whining, every year, about not having starting pitchers as good as those on other teams. Management incompetency is where the problem is, not the circle jerk of getting older by chasing bums from other teams.


    Don't confuse them with logic.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    When you don't have many quality arms on your staff, you pretty much have to look elsewhere, or you stay noncompetitive.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from notin. Show notin's posts

    Re: 2012 Options

    In response to TrotterNixon's comment:

    The Red Sox need to stop slobbering over up years from SP on other teams. Unless there is a young superstar SP or a proven elite SP veteran on a short term contract, forget the whining, every year, about not having starting pitchers as good as those on other teams. Management incompetency is where the problem is, not the circle jerk of getting older by chasing bums from other teams.



    Right, so if your pitching is weak, don't look elsewhere for other pitchers.

    Can we assume the same logic should also be applied to hitting?  Because thinking the Sox should be chasing players from other teams make up about 50% of your posts.  The other 50%, for some odd reason, are dedicated to Tim Wakefield, who does not pitch in Boston any more.

    (By the way, how does 23yo Brett Anderson help the Sox "get older"?)

     

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