A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    Engineering Happiness

     

       Interesting book.  Interesting outlook as well.

     

      A couple of points that really ring true to me as a Sox fan, or as a fan period.

     

      What constitutes being happy?  An insight is that we should all be ecstatic, perhaps even the poorest of us(not the destitute, but not monied either), simply because of all of the jaw dropping conveniences we have compared to the lives of our forefathers a few generations back.  Instead, we take them for granted and expect more.  We always want more and hardly enjoy the mundane things that we take for granted … electricity, running water and indoor plumbing, fast travel,  convenient heat and air conditioning, safe foods and safe ways to preserve foods, advanced medical care and so on ….

      Instead we want more.  The plumbing has to now have two sinks per bathroom, a shower in its own environment and a bath tub that is a spa … (Don’t get me wrong, I like the idea… used to design houses as a hobby and love conceptualization…)

      We don’t want grandma’s fridge – heck, we don’t want LAST season’s model …

      And so it goes.

      Can we be happy … not with less, but with the great state of existence we already have?  I don’t have to hunt down a caribou with a flint topped spear and if lucky enough to bag one, skin it and dress it …

      OK …

      How does that fit as a fan? 

      Just being a fan, is a luxury, of sorts.  To have a distraction, a hobby is a plus.  To have the nearly ethereal connection many of us have with the Red Sox is also a plus.  And it has been, whether the Sox were winning, losing, going to heart stopping and heart breaking pinnacles … and then when the two World Championship seasons of recent history became a part of our history … a new level was developed.   Expectation of succeeding …

       Second point … we can be happy in our situation just because we are in it.  Absent of expectations.   Expectations – and I can hear screaming at this point – can become the determining factor of our pleasure and happiness.

       Going to Fenway with Dad and friends was in and of itself a great moment. 

      When the Sox lost, was it a bummer?  Yeah.  But it never removed the pleasure of being a Sox fan.  We always looked forward to the next game, no matter what.

       I know it takes setting goals to become a top notch athlete … one always strives for more, or he goes no where.

       But does being a fan require one to only have winners to be happy?  Surely not.

        That is the kind of attitude that we consider entitlement.  How often have we railed against that?

     

       I am happy to be a Red Sox fan.  If more comes out of it, all the better.  If not, than I am not going to blame the team for my inability to enjoy this hobby, this pleasure.

      I hope the Sox “engineer” a great season.  But I will be happy to hear the first pitch call of the season and then follow the next 162 or more games with pleasure.  I will not enjoy loss, but I will enjoy being a happy Red Sox fan …

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac35. Show pinstripezac35's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

     

    did U  have a liquid lunch  happy meal today yaz

    here's some more happiness 4 U

    from your happy pitching coach

    I hope U enjoy the happiness

     

     

     

     

    Nieves breaks down Sox starters

    February, 20, 2013

    By Gordon Edes | ESPNBoston.com

    Sox pitching coach Juan Nieves, whom Gordon Edes profiles in a column now posted on ESPNBoston.com, weighs in with his thoughts on some Boston starters:

    Jon Lester: "Wow. A horse. Unbelievable upside still. Stuff is there. Alterations, yes, must make some alterations. Conviction. Tough guy. My God, I never realized he was that big. I saw him really thin years ago. He's a big human. Very talented. Still, stuff is there, and I think with alterations he'll be fine. Not analyzing, conviction with alterations in delivery, trusting that will be challenge. Not more. More is not better."

    Clay Buchholz: "Oh, incredibly talented guy even though I haven't seen him [live], I love what I've seen on video. Athletic, big-time contact guy. Should trust his stuff. Early contact guy. Command guy, still can throw very hard. He can get a punchout when he wants to. Can pitch under the zone early in the count so he can get a lot of groundballs. Keeps walks down. Keeps hit down per innings pitched. He should win 15 to 18 games. What a tremendous athlete."

    Ryan Dempster: "Oh, he brings a lot to the table. Great sense of humor. Hard worker. You're not in big leagues 14, 16 years because you don't work. What a tremendous asset to this staff. Very serious guy but he'll also keep guys loose and relaxed, instead of uptight and wound up. He brings a lot of stability to the staff. He's a student of the game. He'll be the guy who helps [other pitchers]. A lot of guys, I'm sure, will go to him, and I advise them to do it."

    Felix Doubront: "Oh, talented guy. 6-foot-4 lefty with a tremendous arm. Late in the season I saw his adjustments. He brings to the table incredible stuff. Fastball, cutter, curveball, changeup. This guy reminds me of a young CC Sabathia]. Almost the same delivery, the same build. But he has to find himself and I think the best is yet to come from him."

    John Lackey: "Ohhh, he's awesome. He's in great shape. What I've seen right now, I know John [Farrell] spoke to him, was able to see him [this winter] when I was somewhere else, I am thrilled about this guy. Really thrilled. Great guy, great sense of humor, fearless. You always think as a pitching coach, what does he bring to the table after a surgery. He has enough. There's enough stuff there. You always think, does he have to change his style, is it going to take time for him to adjust from being the guy he was to a few clicks [less]. The ball is coming out great, great spin on the fastball, the ball is not cutting true, great delivery, he's back to his old delivery. It might not be 97, 98, [but] the ball is coming out easy. And we know he's a great athlete.

    "As I speak here, we're healthy, if we have a chance to be healthy, it should be fun."

     

     

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    In response to pinstripezac35's comment:

     

    did U  have a liquid lunch  happy meal today yaz

    here's some more happiness 4 U

    from your happy pitching coach

    I hope U enjoy the happiness

     

     

     

     

    Nieves breaks down Sox starters

    February, 20, 2013

    By Gordon Edes | ESPNBoston.com

    Sox pitching coach Juan Nieves, whom Gordon Edes profiles in a column now posted on ESPNBoston.com, weighs in with his thoughts on some Boston starters:

    Jon Lester: "Wow. A horse. Unbelievable upside still. Stuff is there. Alterations, yes, must make some alterations. Conviction. Tough guy. My God, I never realized he was that big. I saw him really thin years ago. He's a big human. Very talented. Still, stuff is there, and I think with alterations he'll be fine. Not analyzing, conviction with alterations in delivery, trusting that will be challenge. Not more. More is not better."

    Clay Buchholz: "Oh, incredibly talented guy even though I haven't seen him [live], I love what I've seen on video. Athletic, big-time contact guy. Should trust his stuff. Early contact guy. Command guy, still can throw very hard. He can get a punchout when he wants to. Can pitch under the zone early in the count so he can get a lot of groundballs. Keeps walks down. Keeps hit down per innings pitched. He should win 15 to 18 games. What a tremendous athlete."

    Ryan Dempster: "Oh, he brings a lot to the table. Great sense of humor. Hard worker. You're not in big leagues 14, 16 years because you don't work. What a tremendous asset to this staff. Very serious guy but he'll also keep guys loose and relaxed, instead of uptight and wound up. He brings a lot of stability to the staff. He's a student of the game. He'll be the guy who helps [other pitchers]. A lot of guys, I'm sure, will go to him, and I advise them to do it."

    Felix Doubront: "Oh, talented guy. 6-foot-4 lefty with a tremendous arm. Late in the season I saw his adjustments. He brings to the table incredible stuff. Fastball, cutter, curveball, changeup. This guy reminds me of a young CC Sabathia]. Almost the same delivery, the same build. But he has to find himself and I think the best is yet to come from him."

    John Lackey: "Ohhh, he's awesome. He's in great shape. What I've seen right now, I know John [Farrell] spoke to him, was able to see him [this winter] when I was somewhere else, I am thrilled about this guy. Really thrilled. Great guy, great sense of humor, fearless. You always think as a pitching coach, what does he bring to the table after a surgery. He has enough. There's enough stuff there. You always think, does he have to change his style, is it going to take time for him to adjust from being the guy he was to a few clicks [less]. The ball is coming out great, great spin on the fastball, the ball is not cutting true, great delivery, he's back to his old delivery. It might not be 97, 98, [but] the ball is coming out easy. And we know he's a great athlete.

    "As I speak here, we're healthy, if we have a chance to be healthy, it should be fun."

     

     




    Heh!   Thanks old friend!

       My day was already made - the good wife and I are driving to Philly to pick up second son and then fly out tomorrow to see older son as he finishes Military Language School in Monterey, CA - but you made it even better! 

      Some guys just blow smoke, but I like what Nieves said.  Thanks again!

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from SanCap. Show SanCap's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    In response to SinceYaz's comment:

    Engineering Happiness

     

       Interesting book.  Interesting outlook as well.

     

      A couple of points that really ring true to me as a Sox fan, or as a fan period.

     

      What constitutes being happy?  An insight is that we should all be ecstatic, perhaps even the poorest of us(not the destitute, but not monied either), simply because of all of the jaw dropping conveniences we have compared to the lives of our forefathers a few generations back.  Instead, we take them for granted and expect more.  We always want more and hardly enjoy the mundane things that we take for granted … electricity, running water and indoor plumbing, fast travel,  convenient heat and air conditioning, safe foods and safe ways to preserve foods, advanced medical care and so on ….

      Instead we want more.  The plumbing has to now have two sinks per bathroom, a shower in its own environment and a bath tub that is a spa … (Don’t get me wrong, I like the idea… used to design houses as a hobby and love conceptualization…)

      We don’t want grandma’s fridge – heck, we don’t want LAST season’s model …

      And so it goes.

      Can we be happy … not with less, but with the great state of existence we already have?  I don’t have to hunt down a caribou with a flint topped spear and if lucky enough to bag one, skin it and dress it …

      OK …

      How does that fit as a fan? 

      Just being a fan, is a luxury, of sorts.  To have a distraction, a hobby is a plus.  To have the nearly ethereal connection many of us have with the Red Sox is also a plus.  And it has been, whether the Sox were winning, losing, going to heart stopping and heart breaking pinnacles … and then when the two World Championship seasons of recent history became a part of our history … a new level was developed.   Expectation of succeeding …

       Second point … we can be happy in our situation just because we are in it.  Absent of expectations.   Expectations – and I can hear screaming at this point – can become the determining factor of our pleasure and happiness.

       Going to Fenway with Dad and friends was in and of itself a great moment. 

      When the Sox lost, was it a bummer?  Yeah.  But it never removed the pleasure of being a Sox fan.  We always looked forward to the next game, no matter what.

       I know it takes setting goals to become a top notch athlete … one always strives for more, or he goes no where.

       But does being a fan require one to only have winners to be happy?  Surely not.

        That is the kind of attitude that we consider entitlement.  How often have we railed against that?

     

       I am happy to be a Red Sox fan.  If more comes out of it, all the better.  If not, than I am not going to blame the team for my inability to enjoy this hobby, this pleasure.

      I hope the Sox “engineer” a great season.  But I will be happy to hear the first pitch call of the season and then follow the next 162 or more games with pleasure.  I will not enjoy loss, but I will enjoy being a happy Red Sox fan …



    Nicely put, and my sentiments exactly - both about life and about being a fan.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    In response to SanCap's comment:



    Nicely put, and my sentiments exactly - both about life and about being a fan.

     




    We are the lucky ones ... :o)

        

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from pumpsie-green. Show pumpsie-green's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    In response to pinstripezac35's comment:

     

    did U  have a liquid lunch  happy meal today yaz

    here's some more happiness 4 U

    from your happy pitching coach

    I hope U enjoy the happiness

     

     

     

     

    Nieves breaks down Sox starters

    February, 20, 2013

    By Gordon Edes | ESPNBoston.com

    Sox pitching coach Juan Nieves, whom Gordon Edes profiles in a column now posted on ESPNBoston.com, weighs in with his thoughts on some Boston starters:

    Jon Lester: "Wow. A horse. Unbelievable upside still. Stuff is there. Alterations, yes, must make some alterations. Conviction. Tough guy. My God, I never realized he was that big. I saw him really thin years ago. He's a big human. Very talented. Still, stuff is there, and I think with alterations he'll be fine. Not analyzing, conviction with alterations in delivery, trusting that will be challenge. Not more. More is not better."

    Clay Buchholz: "Oh, incredibly talented guy even though I haven't seen him [live], I love what I've seen on video. Athletic, big-time contact guy. Should trust his stuff. Early contact guy. Command guy, still can throw very hard. He can get a punchout when he wants to. Can pitch under the zone early in the count so he can get a lot of groundballs. Keeps walks down. Keeps hit down per innings pitched. He should win 15 to 18 games. What a tremendous athlete."

    Ryan Dempster: "Oh, he brings a lot to the table. Great sense of humor. Hard worker. You're not in big leagues 14, 16 years because you don't work. What a tremendous asset to this staff. Very serious guy but he'll also keep guys loose and relaxed, instead of uptight and wound up. He brings a lot of stability to the staff. He's a student of the game. He'll be the guy who helps [other pitchers]. A lot of guys, I'm sure, will go to him, and I advise them to do it."

    Felix Doubront: "Oh, talented guy. 6-foot-4 lefty with a tremendous arm. Late in the season I saw his adjustments. He brings to the table incredible stuff. Fastball, cutter, curveball, changeup. This guy reminds me of a young CC Sabathia]. Almost the same delivery, the same build. But he has to find himself and I think the best is yet to come from him."

    John Lackey: "Ohhh, he's awesome. He's in great shape. What I've seen right now, I know John [Farrell] spoke to him, was able to see him [this winter] when I was somewhere else, I am thrilled about this guy. Really thrilled. Great guy, great sense of humor, fearless. You always think as a pitching coach, what does he bring to the table after a surgery. He has enough. There's enough stuff there. You always think, does he have to change his style, is it going to take time for him to adjust from being the guy he was to a few clicks [less]. The ball is coming out great, great spin on the fastball, the ball is not cutting true, great delivery, he's back to his old delivery. It might not be 97, 98, [but] the ball is coming out easy. And we know he's a great athlete.

    "As I speak here, we're healthy, if we have a chance to be healthy, it should be fun."

     

     




    I like Yaz's piece, but Nieves has regurgitated an unmitigated crock of horse manure. Wonder what he is smoking.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThefourBs. Show ThefourBs's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    In response to SinceYaz's comment:

       I am happy to be a Red Sox fan.  If more comes out of it, all the better.  If not, than I am not going to blame the team for my inability to enjoy this hobby, this pleasure.

      I hope the Sox “engineer” a great season.  But I will be happy to hear the first pitch call of the season and then follow the next 162 or more games with pleasure.  I will not enjoy loss, but I will enjoy being a happy Red Sox fan …



    An excellent perpective, SY.

    +1

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from pumpsie-green. Show pumpsie-green's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    In response to SinceYaz's comment:

    In response to pinstripezac35's comment:

     

     

    did U  have a liquid lunch  happy meal today yaz

    here's some more happiness 4 U

    from your happy pitching coach

    I hope U enjoy the happiness

     

     

     

     

    Nieves breaks down Sox starters

    February, 20, 2013

    By Gordon Edes | ESPNBoston.com

    Sox pitching coach Juan Nieves, whom Gordon Edes profiles in a column now posted on ESPNBoston.com, weighs in with his thoughts on some Boston starters:

    Jon Lester: "Wow. A horse. Unbelievable upside still. Stuff is there. Alterations, yes, must make some alterations. Conviction. Tough guy. My God, I never realized he was that big. I saw him really thin years ago. He's a big human. Very talented. Still, stuff is there, and I think with alterations he'll be fine. Not analyzing, conviction with alterations in delivery, trusting that will be challenge. Not more. More is not better."

    Clay Buchholz: "Oh, incredibly talented guy even though I haven't seen him [live], I love what I've seen on video. Athletic, big-time contact guy. Should trust his stuff. Early contact guy. Command guy, still can throw very hard. He can get a punchout when he wants to. Can pitch under the zone early in the count so he can get a lot of groundballs. Keeps walks down. Keeps hit down per innings pitched. He should win 15 to 18 games. What a tremendous athlete."

    Ryan Dempster: "Oh, he brings a lot to the table. Great sense of humor. Hard worker. You're not in big leagues 14, 16 years because you don't work. What a tremendous asset to this staff. Very serious guy but he'll also keep guys loose and relaxed, instead of uptight and wound up. He brings a lot of stability to the staff. He's a student of the game. He'll be the guy who helps [other pitchers]. A lot of guys, I'm sure, will go to him, and I advise them to do it."

    Felix Doubront: "Oh, talented guy. 6-foot-4 lefty with a tremendous arm. Late in the season I saw his adjustments. He brings to the table incredible stuff. Fastball, cutter, curveball, changeup. This guy reminds me of a young CC Sabathia]. Almost the same delivery, the same build. But he has to find himself and I think the best is yet to come from him."

    John Lackey: "Ohhh, he's awesome. He's in great shape. What I've seen right now, I know John [Farrell] spoke to him, was able to see him [this winter] when I was somewhere else, I am thrilled about this guy. Really thrilled. Great guy, great sense of humor, fearless. You always think as a pitching coach, what does he bring to the table after a surgery. He has enough. There's enough stuff there. You always think, does he have to change his style, is it going to take time for him to adjust from being the guy he was to a few clicks [less]. The ball is coming out great, great spin on the fastball, the ball is not cutting true, great delivery, he's back to his old delivery. It might not be 97, 98, [but] the ball is coming out easy. And we know he's a great athlete.

    "As I speak here, we're healthy, if we have a chance to be healthy, it should be fun."

     

     

     




    Heh!   Thanks old friend!

     

       My day was already made - the good wife and I are driving to Philly to pick up second son and then fly out tomorrow to see older son as he finishes Military Language School in Monterey, CA - but you made it even better! 

      Some guys just blow smoke, but I like what Nieves said.  Thanks again!



    Yaz: if you have not been to Monterey you gotta make time to see the Monterey Aquarium. Its world class. I live about 2 1/2 hours away from there and was in Monterey last weekend.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from SpacemanEephus. Show SpacemanEephus's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

    In response to pinstripezac35's comment:

     

     

    did U  have a liquid lunch  happy meal today yaz

    here's some more happiness 4 U

    from your happy pitching coach

    I hope U enjoy the happiness

     

     

     

     

    Nieves breaks down Sox starters

    February, 20, 2013

    By Gordon Edes | ESPNBoston.com

    Sox pitching coach Juan Nieves, whom Gordon Edes profiles in a column now posted on ESPNBoston.com, weighs in with his thoughts on some Boston starters:

    Jon Lester: "Wow. A horse. Unbelievable upside still. Stuff is there. Alterations, yes, must make some alterations. Conviction. Tough guy. My God, I never realized he was that big. I saw him really thin years ago. He's a big human. Very talented. Still, stuff is there, and I think with alterations he'll be fine. Not analyzing, conviction with alterations in delivery, trusting that will be challenge. Not more. More is not better."

    Clay Buchholz: "Oh, incredibly talented guy even though I haven't seen him [live], I love what I've seen on video. Athletic, big-time contact guy. Should trust his stuff. Early contact guy. Command guy, still can throw very hard. He can get a punchout when he wants to. Can pitch under the zone early in the count so he can get a lot of groundballs. Keeps walks down. Keeps hit down per innings pitched. He should win 15 to 18 games. What a tremendous athlete."

    Ryan Dempster: "Oh, he brings a lot to the table. Great sense of humor. Hard worker. You're not in big leagues 14, 16 years because you don't work. What a tremendous asset to this staff. Very serious guy but he'll also keep guys loose and relaxed, instead of uptight and wound up. He brings a lot of stability to the staff. He's a student of the game. He'll be the guy who helps [other pitchers]. A lot of guys, I'm sure, will go to him, and I advise them to do it."

    Felix Doubront: "Oh, talented guy. 6-foot-4 lefty with a tremendous arm. Late in the season I saw his adjustments. He brings to the table incredible stuff. Fastball, cutter, curveball, changeup. This guy reminds me of a young CC Sabathia]. Almost the same delivery, the same build. But he has to find himself and I think the best is yet to come from him."

    John Lackey: "Ohhh, he's awesome. He's in great shape. What I've seen right now, I know John [Farrell] spoke to him, was able to see him [this winter] when I was somewhere else, I am thrilled about this guy. Really thrilled. Great guy, great sense of humor, fearless. You always think as a pitching coach, what does he bring to the table after a surgery. He has enough. There's enough stuff there. You always think, does he have to change his style, is it going to take time for him to adjust from being the guy he was to a few clicks [less]. The ball is coming out great, great spin on the fastball, the ball is not cutting true, great delivery, he's back to his old delivery. It might not be 97, 98, [but] the ball is coming out easy. And we know he's a great athlete.

    "As I speak here, we're healthy, if we have a chance to be healthy, it should be fun."

     

     

     




     

    I like Yaz's piece, but Nieves has regurgitated an unmitigated crock of horse manure. Wonder what he is smoking.



    Or, maybe he is just a pitching coach trying to psycholigically build up his troops and/or not blow them up in public.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThefourBs. Show ThefourBs's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    In response to SpacemanEephus' comment:

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to pinstripezac35's comment:

     

     

    did U  have a liquid lunch  happy meal today yaz

    here's some more happiness 4 U

    from your happy pitching coach

    I hope U enjoy the happiness

     

     

     

     

    Nieves breaks down Sox starters

    February, 20, 2013

    By Gordon Edes | ESPNBoston.com

    Sox pitching coach Juan Nieves, whom Gordon Edes profiles in a column now posted on ESPNBoston.com, weighs in with his thoughts on some Boston starters:

    Jon Lester: "Wow. A horse. Unbelievable upside still. Stuff is there. Alterations, yes, must make some alterations. Conviction. Tough guy. My God, I never realized he was that big. I saw him really thin years ago. He's a big human. Very talented. Still, stuff is there, and I think with alterations he'll be fine. Not analyzing, conviction with alterations in delivery, trusting that will be challenge. Not more. More is not better."

    Clay Buchholz: "Oh, incredibly talented guy even though I haven't seen him [live], I love what I've seen on video. Athletic, big-time contact guy. Should trust his stuff. Early contact guy. Command guy, still can throw very hard. He can get a punchout when he wants to. Can pitch under the zone early in the count so he can get a lot of groundballs. Keeps walks down. Keeps hit down per innings pitched. He should win 15 to 18 games. What a tremendous athlete."

    Ryan Dempster: "Oh, he brings a lot to the table. Great sense of humor. Hard worker. You're not in big leagues 14, 16 years because you don't work. What a tremendous asset to this staff. Very serious guy but he'll also keep guys loose and relaxed, instead of uptight and wound up. He brings a lot of stability to the staff. He's a student of the game. He'll be the guy who helps [other pitchers]. A lot of guys, I'm sure, will go to him, and I advise them to do it."

    Felix Doubront: "Oh, talented guy. 6-foot-4 lefty with a tremendous arm. Late in the season I saw his adjustments. He brings to the table incredible stuff. Fastball, cutter, curveball, changeup. This guy reminds me of a young CC Sabathia]. Almost the same delivery, the same build. But he has to find himself and I think the best is yet to come from him."

    John Lackey: "Ohhh, he's awesome. He's in great shape. What I've seen right now, I know John [Farrell] spoke to him, was able to see him [this winter] when I was somewhere else, I am thrilled about this guy. Really thrilled. Great guy, great sense of humor, fearless. You always think as a pitching coach, what does he bring to the table after a surgery. He has enough. There's enough stuff there. You always think, does he have to change his style, is it going to take time for him to adjust from being the guy he was to a few clicks [less]. The ball is coming out great, great spin on the fastball, the ball is not cutting true, great delivery, he's back to his old delivery. It might not be 97, 98, [but] the ball is coming out easy. And we know he's a great athlete.

    "As I speak here, we're healthy, if we have a chance to be healthy, it should be fun."

     

     

     




     

    I like Yaz's piece, but Nieves has regurgitated an unmitigated crock of horse manure. Wonder what he is smoking.

     



    Or, maybe he is just a pitching coach trying to psycholigically build up his troops and/or not blow them up in public.

     




    We can't have that, Space!!!

     
  11. This post has been removed.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from jaytftwofive. Show jaytftwofive's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    Agree I'll always be a fan, and that will never change. Great post Yaz. Also we are going to contend and be right there this year.89-93 games, give or take. Why not us?

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     


    Yaz: if you have not been to Monterey you gotta make time to see the Monterey Aquarium. Its world class. I live about 2 1/2 hours away from there and was in Monterey last weekend.

     

     




    The good wife was out to see our son back in August ... loved the Aquarium.  Took hundreds of pics of the wild sea life too.   I am very sure I'll enjoy.  I used to scuba and snorkle as a kid - love the sea.  Thanks for the tip!

     

     

    I am also looking forward to seeing the Giant Redwoods and Sequoia near by....

        and son said we had to see Yosemite ... that this time of year was best in his opinion.

       We are wheels up in about 12 hours ...

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    In response to SpacemanEephus's comment:



    Or, maybe he is just a pitching coach trying to psycholigically build up his troops and/or not blow them up in public.

     




    Hear, hear!!!!

     

        Sure is a better public stance than last season.

     

    And I'm a sucker for the optomistic side ... if one can't tell!  :o)

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from SpacemanEephus. Show SpacemanEephus's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    In response to SinceYaz's comment:

     

    In response to SpacemanEephus's comment:

     



    Or, maybe he is just a pitching coach trying to psycholigically build up his troops and/or not blow them up in public.

     

     




     

    Hear, hear!!!!

     

        Sure is a better public stance than last season.

     

    And I'm a sucker for the optomistic side ... if one can't tell!  :o)

     

    _________________________________________________________________

     



    Me too Yaz.  And to keep the warm and fuzzy warm and fuzzy:  I've been many places on this earth, but nowhere more beautiful than the northern california coast.  Without even having to trek all the way out to Yosemite, you are a stones throw from Carmel, Big Sur.  Any of that stretch of US1 and you are in God's Country.  Enjoy my friend.

     

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from az55. Show az55's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    In response to SinceYaz's comment:

    In response to SpacemanEephus's comment:

     



    Or, maybe he is just a pitching coach trying to psycholigically build up his troops and/or not blow them up in public.

     

     




     

    Hear, hear!!!!

     

        Sure is a better public stance than last season.

     

    And I'm a sucker for the optomistic side ... if one can't tell!  :o)




     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from az55. Show az55's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    Year in year out win or lose these Sox don't bleed.Go Sox!

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sheriff-Rojas. Show Sheriff-Rojas's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    In response to SinceYaz's comment:

     

    Engineering Happiness

     

       Interesting book.  Interesting outlook as well.

     

      A couple of points that really ring true to me as a Sox fan, or as a fan period.

     

      What constitutes being happy?  An insight is that we should all be ecstatic, perhaps even the poorest of us(not the destitute, but not monied either), simply because of all of the jaw dropping conveniences we have compared to the lives of our forefathers a few generations back.  Instead, we take them for granted and expect more.  We always want more and hardly enjoy the mundane things that we take for granted … electricity, running water and indoor plumbing, fast travel,  convenient heat and air conditioning, safe foods and safe ways to preserve foods, advanced medical care and so on ….

      Instead we want more.  The plumbing has to now have two sinks per bathroom, a shower in its own environment and a bath tub that is a spa … (Don’t get me wrong, I like the idea… used to design houses as a hobby and love conceptualization…)

      We don’t want grandma’s fridge – heck, we don’t want LAST season’s model …

      And so it goes.

      Can we be happy … not with less, but with the great state of existence we already have?  I don’t have to hunt down a caribou with a flint topped spear and if lucky enough to bag one, skin it and dress it …

      OK …

      How does that fit as a fan? 

      Just being a fan, is a luxury, of sorts.  To have a distraction, a hobby is a plus.  To have the nearly ethereal connection many of us have with the Red Sox is also a plus.  And it has been, whether the Sox were winning, losing, going to heart stopping and heart breaking pinnacles … and then when the two World Championship seasons of recent history became a part of our history … a new level was developed.   Expectation of succeeding …

       Second point … we can be happy in our situation just because we are in it.  Absent of expectations.   Expectations – and I can hear screaming at this point – can become the determining factor of our pleasure and happiness.

       Going to Fenway with Dad and friends was in and of itself a great moment. 

      When the Sox lost, was it a bummer?  Yeah.  But it never removed the pleasure of being a Sox fan.  We always looked forward to the next game, no matter what.

       I know it takes setting goals to become a top notch athlete … one always strives for more, or he goes no where.

       But does being a fan require one to only have winners to be happy?  Surely not.

        That is the kind of attitude that we consider entitlement.  How often have we railed against that?

     

       I am happy to be a Red Sox fan.  If more comes out of it, all the better.  If not, than I am not going to blame the team for my inability to enjoy this hobby, this pleasure.

      I hope the Sox “engineer” a great season.  But I will be happy to hear the first pitch call of the season and then follow the next 162 or more games with pleasure.  I will not enjoy loss, but I will enjoy being a happy Red Sox fan …

     



    Well, SinceYaz, I guess you haven't read the retort to Engineering Happiness.  It's by Georom Mitch Softlaw, 806 and Danny Cater Galehouse.  it's entitled, Engineering Misery.  Here's an excerpt:

     

    What constitutes being miserable?  An insight is that we should all be troubled, perhaps even the richest of us,  because of all of the  inconveniences we have to suffer that we shouldn't tolerate.  Instead, we remain content  and expect less.  We always expect less and extol the virtues of the mundane things that we should take for granted … electricity, running water and indoor plumbing, fast travel,  convenient heat and air conditioning, safe foods and safe ways to preserve foods, advanced medical care and so on ….


    How does that fit as a fan?  Draw your own conclusions.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    We might have gotten to the point where we have too successful for our own good.  There is fair of enjoyment of starting with very little, and then getting a decent lifestyle.  Unless you've struggled, it is hard to know happiness and satisfaction.

    The way my kid explained it to me, a person in Africa might struggle to get enough to eat.  Once he's eaten, he is fulfilled.  Over here, what fulfills people?  Not everyone has enough, but enough people have a life without any particular need.

    We segue into BB by thinking of what it used to be for RS fans.  '67, '75, '86.  There was a long period of time when RS fans just rooted for the team, and once every ten years, experienced a wild ride.

    Then Theo and Tito signed on, and the playoffs were taken for granted, and the standard for happiness, for some, was nothing less than a WSC.

    We went from being the farmer in Africa to being the 18 year old who got a BMW for his 18th birthday.

    We were too succssful for our own good.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    In response to pinstripezac35's comment:

     

    did U  have a liquid lunch  happy meal today yaz

    here's some more happiness 4 U

    from your happy pitching coach

    I hope U enjoy the happiness

     

     

     

     

    Nieves breaks down Sox starters

    February, 20, 2013

    By Gordon Edes | ESPNBoston.com

    Sox pitching coach Juan Nieves, whom Gordon Edes profiles in a column now posted on ESPNBoston.com, weighs in with his thoughts on some Boston starters:

    Jon Lester: "Wow. A horse. Unbelievable upside still. Stuff is there. Alterations, yes, must make some alterations. Conviction. Tough guy. My God, I never realized he was that big. I saw him really thin years ago. He's a big human. Very talented. Still, stuff is there, and I think with alterations he'll be fine. Not analyzing, conviction with alterations in delivery, trusting that will be challenge. Not more. More is not better."

    Clay Buchholz: "Oh, incredibly talented guy even though I haven't seen him [live], I love what I've seen on video. Athletic, big-time contact guy. Should trust his stuff. Early contact guy. Command guy, still can throw very hard. He can get a punchout when he wants to. Can pitch under the zone early in the count so he can get a lot of groundballs. Keeps walks down. Keeps hit down per innings pitched. He should win 15 to 18 games. What a tremendous athlete."

    Ryan Dempster: "Oh, he brings a lot to the table. Great sense of humor. Hard worker. You're not in big leagues 14, 16 years because you don't work. What a tremendous asset to this staff. Very serious guy but he'll also keep guys loose and relaxed, instead of uptight and wound up. He brings a lot of stability to the staff. He's a student of the game. He'll be the guy who helps [other pitchers]. A lot of guys, I'm sure, will go to him, and I advise them to do it."

    Felix Doubront: "Oh, talented guy. 6-foot-4 lefty with a tremendous arm. Late in the season I saw his adjustments. He brings to the table incredible stuff. Fastball, cutter, curveball, changeup. This guy reminds me of a young CC Sabathia]. Almost the same delivery, the same build. But he has to find himself and I think the best is yet to come from him."

    John Lackey: "Ohhh, he's awesome. He's in great shape. What I've seen right now, I know John [Farrell] spoke to him, was able to see him [this winter] when I was somewhere else, I am thrilled about this guy. Really thrilled. Great guy, great sense of humor, fearless. You always think as a pitching coach, what does he bring to the table after a surgery. He has enough. There's enough stuff there. You always think, does he have to change his style, is it going to take time for him to adjust from being the guy he was to a few clicks [less]. The ball is coming out great, great spin on the fastball, the ball is not cutting true, great delivery, he's back to his old delivery. It might not be 97, 98, [but] the ball is coming out easy. And we know he's a great athlete.

    "As I speak here, we're healthy, if we have a chance to be healthy, it should be fun."

     

     




    Probably the most sarcastic comment I've seen in a long time. And then injecting what he would hope would be a ridiculed analysis of the pitching he somehow had ready to go. So transparent and yet so invisible.

    And to think, the thread was just celebrating how it feels to be a Sox fan in good times and bad and how lucky we are.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from BostonTrollSpanker. Show BostonTrollSpanker's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    I make a huge distinction between deep happiness and joy that comes from well being and community than a superficial type "Pike like" forced positive thinking pseudo-happiness. 

    To answer Yaz' OP, modern conveniences are nice but do not take the place of true love and a sense of purpose and family. When you're isolated and in poor health, the fact you can walk your lonely self down to the store to get a quart of milk at any time of day or night is not a huge consolation. 

    Music is a great example, we have all this tech and ability to download all this modern music and yet give me a crackling Abbey Road or Led Zeppelin IV on vinyl any day of the week. Or give me a guitar that was built 100 years ago and I'll play to my heart's content. Modern tech and convenience is wildly overrated. 

    So is trying to talk yourself into buying into the PR-hyped crud that comes out of Fenway on a regular basis. 

    What I will say is that being a fan is tricky because you need to have some level of emotional investment but there is a danger to putting a team in the center of your life, it's an easy way to become bitter and entitled. 

    I have great memories of two amazing championships (and some other good playoff runs) so I don't need to win it all every year. At the same time there is nothing wrong with being disgusted at how the team fell apart last year. 

    To me folks make too much out of being positive. I think what matters is being passionate and having your values and life priorities in order. Sometimes being positive is talking yourself into stuff you should be saying no to, like a soulless job you need to quit. 

    That said to each their own and if you find a way to be happy in your Red Sox fandom and beyond then a tip of the cap to you. :) 

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ice-Cream. Show Ice-Cream's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

     

    MLB has moved in the right direction to help small market teams such as the A's or Rays compete (e.g. revenue sharing, a more strict luxury tax, giving up draft picks when signing a free agent).

    But I think the fans from small market teams are not as passionate as Red Sox or Yankee fans.  

    I once went to a Red Sox vs. Rays game at Tropicana Field.  At most, 20,000 fans showed up.  It was so empty, the stadium personnel allowed me and my friend to sit closer to the field.   To me, that's pretty sad--your team is in a playoff hunt and your playing against a main division rival and only 20,000 fans show up (and at least 1/3 were Red Sox fans).  

    Have any of you been to an Oakland A's game?  Going to their stadium to park your car and then buy a ticket is as easy as ordering a cup of coffee at Dunkin Donuts.   LOL

     

     

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from Frank N Stein. Show Frank N Stein's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    The analysis of this team's fans is what led John Henry to buy this team, hire good people to bring success...and then flush it all down the toilet.

    The ratings slipt a bit when all the fairweather fans went out to play min golf or watch realty shows and lame movies. This has the Henry gang ( especially Werner Von Dumb) very worried, they need those fairweather fans to keep them rich. Us poor slobs that suffer through thick and thin will keep Henry and Werner out of the dollar and thrift stores, but it's the casual fans they are losing that concerns them.  

    It behoves them to set the team straight and get them in the playoffs ( preferably the World Series) again soon, that empty spot in Henry's 10 car garage needs another Mercedes....too bad they care only from a financial standpoint and they don't give a damn about loyal , diehards like SinceYaz.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ice-Cream. Show Ice-Cream's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    Speaking of happy fan, remember the female fan (sat behind home plate) who showed her b@@bs during a game at Fenway?  This was a few years ago.  God bless her.   LOL

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    Re: A Happy Fan ... because I can be one

    In response to Sheriff-Rojas's comment:

    In response to SinceYaz's comment:

     

    Engineering Happiness

     

       Interesting book.  Interesting outlook as well.

     

      A couple of points that really ring true to me as a Sox fan, or as a fan period.

     

      What constitutes being happy?  An insight is that we should all be ecstatic, perhaps even the poorest of us(not the destitute, but not monied either), simply because of all of the jaw dropping conveniences we have compared to the lives of our forefathers a few generations back.  Instead, we take them for granted and expect more.  We always want more and hardly enjoy the mundane things that we take for granted … electricity, running water and indoor plumbing, fast travel,  convenient heat and air conditioning, safe foods and safe ways to preserve foods, advanced medical care and so on ….

      Instead we want more.  The plumbing has to now have two sinks per bathroom, a shower in its own environment and a bath tub that is a spa … (Don’t get me wrong, I like the idea… used to design houses as a hobby and love conceptualization…)

      We don’t want grandma’s fridge – heck, we don’t want LAST season’s model …

      And so it goes.

      Can we be happy … not with less, but with the great state of existence we already have?  I don’t have to hunt down a caribou with a flint topped spear and if lucky enough to bag one, skin it and dress it …

      OK …

      How does that fit as a fan? 

      Just being a fan, is a luxury, of sorts.  To have a distraction, a hobby is a plus.  To have the nearly ethereal connection many of us have with the Red Sox is also a plus.  And it has been, whether the Sox were winning, losing, going to heart stopping and heart breaking pinnacles … and then when the two World Championship seasons of recent history became a part of our history … a new level was developed.   Expectation of succeeding …

       Second point … we can be happy in our situation just because we are in it.  Absent of expectations.   Expectations – and I can hear screaming at this point – can become the determining factor of our pleasure and happiness.

       Going to Fenway with Dad and friends was in and of itself a great moment. 

      When the Sox lost, was it a bummer?  Yeah.  But it never removed the pleasure of being a Sox fan.  We always looked forward to the next game, no matter what.

       I know it takes setting goals to become a top notch athlete … one always strives for more, or he goes no where.

       But does being a fan require one to only have winners to be happy?  Surely not.

        That is the kind of attitude that we consider entitlement.  How often have we railed against that?

     

       I am happy to be a Red Sox fan.  If more comes out of it, all the better.  If not, than I am not going to blame the team for my inability to enjoy this hobby, this pleasure.

      I hope the Sox “engineer” a great season.  But I will be happy to hear the first pitch call of the season and then follow the next 162 or more games with pleasure.  I will not enjoy loss, but I will enjoy being a happy Red Sox fan …

     



    Well, SinceYaz, I guess you haven't read the retort to Engineering Happiness.  It's by Georom Mitch Softlaw, 806 and Danny Cater Galehouse.  it's entitled, Engineering Misery.  Here's an excerpt:

     

    What constitutes being miserable?  An insight is that we should all be troubled, perhaps even the richest of us,  because of all of the  inconveniences we have to suffer that we shouldn't tolerate.  Instead, we remain content  and expect less.  We always expect less and extol the virtues of the mundane things that we should take for granted … electricity, running water and indoor plumbing, fast travel,  convenient heat and air conditioning, safe foods and safe ways to preserve foods, advanced medical care and so on ….


    How does that fit as a fan?  Draw your own conclusions.



      Sheriff, my good friend, I knew there would be the response similar to what you have alerted me to.  I - heck, we - deal with the negative all the time.  And the response from them is that they have every right to be negative.  This is true.  But it does not constitute evidence of wisdom, power or success.  It only repeats itself over and over again until it becomes a mantra that sours the air. 

      Being negative feeds negativity ... unless we react against it.  I know this from personal experience.  I lived long stretches of time when I allowed the negative to rule my thoughts and sour my personality and life.

      Being a Red Sox fan could easily lead to being negative.  But that could be said of most teams.  After all, there have been less than 140 WS champions ... and in that same period of time, at least 1500 teams have failed ... making it clear that the chances have always been at least 16 to 1 that faced failure....

       I did not use exact figures but gave room for .... failure to speak for itself in rough terms.

       I exoect to have a good to season ....

     
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