Boston Legacy of Aaron Cook

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    Boston Legacy of Aaron Cook

    Cook pitched 94 innings for the Red Sox in 2012, and he allowed 59 earned runs on 117 hits. He went 4-11 with that 5.65 ERA. He was not, to put it politely, one of Boston's bright spots.

    But on that Friday night at Safeco Field, none of what happened before or would happen after mattered. For those two hours and 18 minutes -- and if you want to be more specific, Cook was on the hill for roughly 53 of them -- the right-handed sinkerballer put on a pitching clinic in a 5-0 shutout.

    Cook threw 81 pitches in facing 28 batters all night. (Two days later, Felix Doubront would throw 103 pitches in 4 1/3 innings. While Cook retired 27 batters in 81 pitches, Doubront recorded his 11th out of the game with his 81st pitch against the same Seattle lineup.)

    Two got hits (one on the infield), and both were erased by subsequent double plays. A third reached base on a Mike Aviles error. His most laborious inning was the seventh, in which he had to throw 12 pitches. (In the other three games of that series with the Mariners, Red Sox starters combined to have six innings with 12 or fewer pitches. Cook had nine.)

    His toughest batter of the night was Justin Smoak in the sixth; the Seattle first baseman was the only Mariner to get Cook to a three-ball count. He saw six pitches in the at-bat.

    Cook threw 19 first-pitch strikes to 28 hitters, and 13 of his encounters lasted two or fewer pitches. One could barely blame Seattle's anemic offensive showing on its spacious ballpark: Fifteen of the 27 outs came on the ground. One ball reached the warning track.

    And perhaps the greatest number of all? Zero, or how many times a Mariner swung and failed to make contact.

    "I got into a really good rhythm early," Cook said. "I was commanding the ball down in the zone, and I knew they were trying to be aggressive. I depend a lot on my defense, and they played great tonight."

    "He just did what he always does -- sinker, sinker, sinker," said catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia of the pitch Cook threw 73 times on Friday. "It's fun to sit there and put one finger down.... I felt like I caught five innings tonight."

    It was a two-hit wonder of a performance, and a reminder that sometimes success in baseball can be straightforward -- and seemingly inexplicable.

    Said Valentine after the game, "Amazing, huh?"

     

    http://blogs.providencejournal.com/sports/red-sox/2013/01/a-year-in-review-best-performances-of-2012.html

     
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  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThefourBs. Show ThefourBs's posts

    Re: Boston Legacy of Aaron Cook

    In response to EdithBRTN's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    It was one of the best Red Sox performances of 2012. Savor it.

    http://blogs.providencejournal.com/sports/red-sox/2013/01/a-year-in-review-best-performances-of-2012.html

    [/QUOTE]


    You'll have to excuse the Yankee fan if he doesn't appreciate it.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: Boston Legacy of Aaron Cook

    And perhaps the greatest number of all? Zero, or how many times a Mariner swung and failed to make contact.

     

    Shows how Ks and K rates are over-valued.

     
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  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Boston Legacy of Aaron Cook

    History is full of examples like this.

    Being great for one night is like being on Jeopardy and getting 1(one) answer right.

    You get no prizes for that, not that I am aware of, anyway.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThefourBs. Show ThefourBs's posts

    Re: Boston Legacy of Aaron Cook

    In response to ZILLAGOD's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    History is full of examples like this.

    Being great for one night is like being on Jeopardy and getting 1(one) answer right.

    You get no prizes for that, not that I am aware of, anyway.

    [/QUOTE]

    So, they shouldn't be mentioned?

    I think everyone is aware that Cook was lousy last year.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Boston Legacy of Aaron Cook

    Like Zilla said, one game doesn't prove anything. The game was at Safeco against the weak hitting Mariners, for crying out loud.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThefourBs. Show ThefourBs's posts

    Re: Boston Legacy of Aaron Cook

    In response to devildavid's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Like Zilla said, one game doesn't prove anything. The game was at Safeco against the weak hitting Mariners, for crying out loud.

    [/QUOTE]


    I wasn't aware anyone was trying to prove anything.

     
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  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThefourBs. Show ThefourBs's posts

    Re: Boston Legacy of Aaron Cook

    In response to pinstripezac's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to ThefourBs' comment:



    You'll have to excuse the Yankee fan if he doesn't appreciate it.




    sure I can appreciate a great game against a

    juggernaut like the mariners in a hitters park like safeco

    it's the 4-11 a 5.65 ERA that tarnished ''the legacy'' not me


    next time you hear someone say

    aaron cook or  ''low risk high reward ''

    you can smile and think about

    'the game' '

    ''the Legacy of Aaron Cook''

    I'll be worried while of thinking sure the $ were low risk

    but in the end it was very costly ...........4-11/ 5.65  
     

    [/QUOTE]


    2012 is over.

    I don't see the point in worrying about it.

    I have better things to do, but that's just me.

     
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  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThefourBs. Show ThefourBs's posts

    Re: Boston Legacy of Aaron Cook

    In response to pinstripezac's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to ThefourBs' comment:



    2012 is over.

    I don't see the point in worrying about it.

    I have better things to do, but that's just me.




    unless you think we will

    never again hear the words

    ''low risk high reward ''

    U have missed my point

    [/QUOTE]

    Frankly, it's usually difficult to tell if and when you have a point.

     
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  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: Boston Legacy of Aaron Cook

    In response to moonslav59's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    And perhaps the greatest number of all? Zero, or how many times a Mariner swung and failed to make contact.

     

    Shows how Ks and K rates are over-valued.

    [/QUOTE]

    Not if taken in context.

    If you look at the top-30 K/9 rates, 26 of them had ERAs of less than 4.14.

     
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  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from djcbuffum. Show djcbuffum's posts

    Re: Boston Legacy of Aaron Cook

    I was out of the country and away from live media at the time of this game, but I read about it in the paper afterwards.  It was the kind of moment that got your hopes up for the season...sort of teased you along.  I wish I could have listened on the radio.

     

     
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  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from Flapjack07. Show Flapjack07's posts

    Re: Boston Legacy of Aaron Cook

    In response to pinstripezac's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    He went 4-11 with that 5.65 ERA

    some like to call that

    ''low risk high reward ''

    [/QUOTE]


    I confess I'm a fan of "low risk, high reward" myself. Sometimes it works out great (see Colon and Garcia, 2011), but very often it does not.

    Cook pitched some very good games, along with some very bad ones, and the final results weren't pretty. I was skeptical last spring when some people thought he was a savior after a good ST and some good Pawtucket starts, but ultimately, for $1.5 million, he plugged a hole in our ravaged rotation at a time when we really didn't have any better options. That may not be a LRHR success story, but I call it useful.

     
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