Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

  1. This post has been removed.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from sindarin-erebor. Show sindarin-erebor's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    Points all well take regarding all three commissioners, however MLB Commissioners are truly Puppets of the Owner's majority.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac32. Show pinstripezac32's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?


    He refuses to change a patently unfair designated hitter rule (either use it in both leagues or get rid of it),

    it's not for him to change

    it's between the players union and NL owners

    neither will be changing their minds anytime soon



    he insisted on the World Baseball Classic foolishness

    I would think that anyone who loves the game

    should be all for helping it grow

    oh yeah this is RSN where they applaud the FO

    for cheating mlb from  growing



    and he allows home field advantage in the World Series to be determined by the outcome of a midsummer exhibition game

    what's so bad about that

    did it increase interest  a lot...... no

    some........I think so



     he won't allow the Oakland As to move to San Jose.
     He's taken control of the Dodgers

    so are those things worse than not allowing the sox to go to the highest bidder

    if you love your FO, like you should,
     
    you should be thanking bud
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from fivekatz. Show fivekatz's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    I happen to disagree with you. Baseball has had mostly bad to non-descript commissioners so it isn't hard to say Selig is one of the best. Your grievances have a flip side, which many do.

    The DH. Getting rid of it wouldn't be easy first off. AL teams have payroll dollars wrapped up in DH's and the MLBPA would not easily get on board with the idea of doing away with 14 good paying jobs for 14 lesser paying jobs. And as far as making in universal, I wouldn't mind seeing that because it would add offense to the senior circuit but it does create a differentiation between the two leagues in an era where inter-league created some brand blur.

    He does not have much of a choice regarding the A's moving to San Jose. It was designated as the Giants territory because of which side of the bay they were on. If the Giants were so inclined and they appeared to be, to challenge MLB and the A's in court if MLB allowed it, Selig would have opened the door potentially to a situation like the NFL has where teams freely move for quick pay days with the league having little say in the matter. Thank Al Davis, don't blame Bud if this one bugs you. And the move to Fremont should be positive enough anyway.

    The All-Star game fix was stupid. But it was possible because WS home field advantage was handled by a random alternating years assignment prior to the "fix". Still an over reaction to having to call an exhibition game while tied. Just the same it was and continues to be the most relevant all-star event in North America.

    WBC? There are pros and cons. The idea is good enough which is to stimulate the popularity of baseball world wide which creates more audience and over time a broader talent pool. But because it is ST time it has been hard on players and in particular pitchers. Dice K and Jake Peavy IMO were victims of pitching too much under pressure too early.

    Pros? MLB has the best internet and content access in North America. Wild card has been a tremendous success IMO. The sport has reasonable parity while maintaining perennial powerhouse brands and does all this is in a mostly free market system. He has succeed where others failed in creating labor-management peace and was able to get important concessions on CBT and revenue sharing from both ownership and the MLBPA. On his watch a renaissance in ballpark design took place.

    Cons? He looked the other way on PEDs for a long time, preferring to negotiate hard lines with the MLBPA on financial impact issues like CBT and revenue sharing. Because of that the issue gets way more attention than it does in other sports.

    Bud surprisingly considering he was a small market owner performed his job remarkably well and over saw an era with more change than any other MLB commissioner ever did and did so in a way that transformed the game yet kept its essence in tact. Far from worst, history may well say that he was the best.

    Bowie Kuhn was probably the worst commissioner. Ignored the arbitrator who begged him to cut a deal with the MLBPA when Messerschmidt and McNally played without contracts for a year and sued for FA. Arrogantly he wrapped himself in Landis' gift of anti-trust exemption and the arbitrator did what he had to declaring the contracts full expired and the reserve clause invalid. He then play into Miller's hand by creating limitations to FA that kept supply low in any one season and created the salary inflation we see today. To get it he gave arbitration which was a run away train in the 80's, more inflationary than FA in fact.

    If not for the dumb luck of having the Reds and Red Sox meet in the 75 WS and NBC installing a creative producer in the trucks Kuhn may have actually been able to wreck baseball as a viable sports product. He was the worst. 
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    We can get even with Bud by beating the sh*t out of his hometown team , the Milwaukee Brewers.

    Perhaps, with old town team reeling, Bud will wake up and smell the coffee, move the Oakland A's to China, replace the DH with a 4th outfielder ( who will be called a "rover"), abolish the ALL-Star game ( silly exercise in futility) , give the home field advantage in the W.S. to the team that wins a coin-toss (hey, works alright for football!) and sell the Dodgers to Arnold Schwarzenegger ( they change their names to the Terminators).

    Either that or let's start a campaign to make Hank Aaron commisioner so he can suit up for any   team at any time and reclaim his homerun title from the steroid abusers who have and will pass him in homeruns....thus making all their totals irrelevant ( of course , he'd have to be allowed to use a corked bat....but hey , it's the right thing to do!)
     
  6. This post has been removed.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from WE5NUTS. Show WE5NUTS's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    The AL wants the DH, the NL doesn't, both think that their way is the way baseball should be played. Why change it? I like that All Star game determines home field because it gives the managers an incentive to win instead og trying to give everybody an equal chance in a game based on credentials. Remember when the AL ran out of pitchers?
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from susan250. Show susan250's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    Stern is the worst commissioner of all of the major sports.  It isn't even close.  Nothing is going to change in the NBA until he resigns or retires. 
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from sindarin-erebor. Show sindarin-erebor's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    The thought of the NBA is revolting. Go Hoosiers, Go Cards, Go Vandy!!
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from BosoxJoe5. Show BosoxJoe5's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    What is bad about Bud is not listed on your listen, those are pretty mandane. He has done good things as a comissioner(the WildCard is a huge example, and rebuilt baseball after the worst work stoppage in prosports)

    Why Bud is a bad person:

    He is largely responsible for the 1994 Strike not as the comissioner but as the owner of the Brewer, he colluded with another owner and between the two them they stole 800 million from the players, which the owners as a whole had to pay back. This created a huge amount of distrust on both sides, with Donald Ferher still disliking him to this day.

    He got Faye Vincent fired because he felt he was too powerful. Fay Vincent is considered the last comissioner because he was some indepdent while Bud was and still is an owner. This is completely the reverse of what the owners wanted/needed in 1920. Bud basically named himself comissioner, which weaken the Lt. Comissioner position which was design to prepare the next comissioner. This is a large reason why it took him 6 year to lost the interim title.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from royf19. Show royf19's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    In Response to Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?:
    [QUOTE]He refuses to change a patently unfair designated hitter rule (either use it in both leagues or get rid of it), it's not for him to change it's between the players union and NL owners neither will be changing their minds anytime soon he insisted on the World Baseball Classic foolishness I would think that anyone who loves the game should be all for helping it grow oh yeah this is RSN where they applaud the FO for cheating mlb from  growing and he allows home field advantage in the World Series to be determined by the outcome of a midsummer exhibition game what's so bad about that did it increase interest  a lot...... no some........I think so  he won't allow the Oakland As to move to San Jose.  He's taken control of the Dodgers so are those things worse than not allowing the sox to go to the highest bidder if you love your FO, like you should,   you should be thanking bud
    Posted by pinstripezac32[/QUOTE]
    Zac,

    Some good points but, you should have quit while your ahead.

    1. DH -- I agree. The NL doesn't want it and the Players Union won't give up those jobs, which are still higher paying overall, in the AL. This has nothing to do with Selig.

    2. WBC -- I'm against the WBC because there's no good time for it using major league players. But Selig's intentions with should be applauded. But as for "FO for cheating MLB from growing," what the he!! does that mean. (It's not like every the Yankees have done are always in the best interests of the game overall).

    3. Using the All-Star game for home field advantage is idiotic. The All-Star game is an exhibition that's it. It's ridiculous to use it for anything else. Entirely too much was made for the tied score a few years back. It was the only one in All-Star history not weather related and it was a huge overreaction. What the reaction should have been was simple -- just put an innings limit (let's say 12) for the All-Star game. The managers can then use their pitchers appropriately, and realistically,  if they did that, how many ties would there be? How many extra innings games have there been.

    4. I don't know enough about the Oakland situation to say if it's right or wrong. He's absolutely right in the way he's handing the Dodgers' situation. Selig is doing what he should do as commissioner in protecting the game. Your comment about not allowing the Sox go to the highest bidder is ignorant. The so-called highest bid was smoke and mirrors. There were some conditions as I recall and wasn't sound financially. Plus either that bid or another bid was done after the bids were finalized. The Sox bid was the best when you look at how financially sound it is. And that hardly was unique to the Sox sale. There have been other sales where the financial stability of the bid cause it not to be accepted even if it was a higher dollar amount. The only thing Selig did was encourage Henry to join forces with Werner and Lucchino. And remember -- one of the bidders was McCourt. Selig was right in not accepting McCourt's bid. Where he messed up was letting McCourt buy the Dodgers despite questionable finances even back then.


    More on Selig.

    I think he's honestly tried to improve the game. He was right on re-alignment and the Wild Card. Maybe even right in the short term of interleague play, but I think it's run its course.

    I'm not a big fan of what I've read on the proposed upcoming changes, so we'll see how it turns  out.

    And the one that has to be remembered. Selig can only do so much because ultimately, the owners rule things, and the owners won't allowa  Mountain Landis-like dictator any more to be commissioner. That's why he has the least blame concerning PEDs. There was nothing he could do because of the pwer of the union. Remember, it basically took an act of Congress to be where we are now.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from fivekatz. Show fivekatz's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    In Response to Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?:
    [QUOTE]What is bad about Bud is not listed on your listen, those are pretty mandane. He has done good things as a comissioner(the WildCard is a huge example, and rebuilt baseball after the worst work stoppage in prosports) Why Bud is a bad person: He is largely responsible for the 1994 Strike not as the comissioner but as the owner of the Brewer, he colluded with another owner and between the two them they stole 800 million from the players, which the owners as a whole had to pay back. This created a huge amount of distrust on both sides, with Donald Ferher still disliking him to this day. He got Faye Vincent fired because he felt he was too powerful. Fay Vincent is considered the last comissioner because he was some indepdent while Bud was and still is an owner. This is completely the reverse of what the owners wanted/needed in 1920. Bud basically named himself comissioner, which weaken the Lt. Comissioner position which was design to prepare the next comissioner. This is a large reason why it took him 6 year to lost the interim title.
    Posted by BosoxJoe5[/QUOTE]Good points Joe. But what the owners wanted was the appearance of the commissioner being independent because of the Black Sox scandal but they wanted that power to be seated with a owner centric head. It was why they picked Judge Kensaw Landis who had gifted them the reserve clause in a flawed landmark ruling giving baseball its anti-trust exemption. Landis' independence did not change his strong leaning towards ownership and against labor.

    It isn't different in any other sport in America. The commissioners are the custodians of the business model not the game. Godell and Stern are negotiating for their owners not their "sports". Godell and the NFL are currently trying to increase advantage, Stern OTOH is attempting to overt disaster. If Stern is falling short, he is not able to bring the players along enough to see this is a mutual interest but Bettman could not bring along his players with much more dire circumstances. The product of deep rooted distrust. 

    Selig for a small market owner has actually done a great job navigating the many different interest groups amongst his ownership ranks and surprisingly given his history built a level of cooperation with the MLBPA that no other MLB commissioner could and no current commissioner in the other sports seem to be able to. And that in part is because he has somehow been able to create an atmosphere where distrust is reduced and both sides recognize where their mutual interests lay. Maybe only a former owner could do that because the owners had to change their approach to labor to make that happen.

    IMO history is going to treat his tenure very well, with PEDs being a notable exception.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from b126962. Show b126962's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

     Yes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from betterredthandead. Show betterredthandead's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    Worst MLBPA President in history?  Hard to pick just one, they are all crooks.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sauron. Show Sauron's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    Saying that Selig was powerless in regards to PEDs is pretty short-sighted. Selig is the ultimate "owner's commissioner", considering he was an owner himself. It's understandable why the commissioner's office and the owners all turned a blind eye to the problem, but that still doesn't make it right. They could have done a hell of a lot more about PEDs long before it became an issue. Instead, they waited until most every important record (and the sport itself) was desecrated, then pretended that they knew nothing about it when it's quite obvious they did. The only reason the player's union was so difficult in allowing testing to be implemented was because everyone had been turning a blind eye to it for so long, and the union knew that the players were then going to get dumped on while ownership acted appalled while standing on their supposed moral high ground. Yes, Selig has done some things that have been good for the sport, but that doesn't excuse the PED mess, which is the biggest black mark on the sport since the Black Sox scandal.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from betterredthandead. Show betterredthandead's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    The MLBPA is 100% responsible for PED use. End of story.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from DaffyDan. Show DaffyDan's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    In Response to Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?:
    [QUOTE]The MLBPA is 100% responsible for PED use. End of story.
    Posted by betterredthandead[/QUOTE]

    False. 
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from ma6dragon9. Show ma6dragon9's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    Everyone is responsible for PEDs in baseball.

    The players took them.

    The teams turned a blind eye and allowed it.

    The fans celebrated the outrageous surge in power numbers when it should have been more widely questioned.

    The irony of it all is that Jose Canseco is the reason changes were made! He actually did something good for baseball, nobody saw that coming.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Goofywocky. Show Goofywocky's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    You expect me to believe that bud selig and his buddy buck showalter had no knowledge of their players----Gonzales, Sosa, Gagne, Aclod,.... were using roids??  This is why baseball is no longer our favorite past time...they brought the fraud to the game and should never be allowed in baseball
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Goofywocky. Show Goofywocky's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    and pay attention...selig was an owner, to a team that should have been contracted, the brewers.  How can it be so difficult for folks to understand this?
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac32. Show pinstripezac32's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?


    greetings roy


    Some good points but, you should have quit while your ahead.


    LOL wait till you read my response to #2

    1. DH -- I agree. The NL doesn't want it and the Players Union won't give up those jobs, which are still higher paying overall, in the AL. This has nothing to do with Selig.

    that's right, the nl doesn't want to add the money and the union won't give it up

    I have NP with it other than during interleauge

    I believe the NL is the only place in the world where they don't have the DH




    3. Using the All-Star game for home field advantage is idiotic. The All-Star game is an exhibition that's it. It's ridiculous to use it for anything else. Entirely too much was made for the tied score a few years back. It was the only one in All-Star history not weather related and it was a huge overreaction. What the reaction should have been was simple -- just put an innings limit (let's say 12) for the All-Star game. The managers can then use their pitchers appropriately, and realistically, if they did that, how many ties would there be? How many extra innings games have there been.

    I know you are saying they did too,

     but you are clearly mixing apples with oranges

    I agree they over reacted and

    I think the 12 inning limit is a great idea

    but if you keep in mind the old way

     I see NP with the winner wining HF


    not saying it's a great  or the best way

    but nothing to trash the guy over



    4.  Your comment about not allowing the Sox go to the highest bidder is ignorant. The so-called highest bid was smoke and mirrors. There were some conditions as I recall and wasn't sound financially. Plus either that bid or another bid was done after the bids were finalized. The Sox bid was the best when you look at how financially sound it is. And that hardly was unique to the Sox sale. There have been other sales where the financial stability of the bid cause it not to be accepted even if it was a higher dollar amount. The only thing Selig did was encourage Henry to join forces with Werner and Lucchino. And remember -- one of the bidders was McCourt. Selig was right in not accepting McCourt's bid. Where he messed up was letting McCourt buy the Dodgers despite questionable finances even back then.

    ignorant seems a tad strong roy

    here's another ignorant opinion


    It was time for Commissioner Selig's game of musical franchises. Enter Florida Marlins owner John Henry.

    When Henry bought the Marlins in 1998, he inherited the terrible stadium lease former owner Wayne Huizenga had "negotiated" with himself for the Marlins. Henry vowed to build a new park with his own money if necessary...but within a year or two he was saying, "Well, I'll use my own funds if I must, but if I do there won't be any money left to sign players, so can't the taxpayers spare a few hundred million?" Keep listening for the first notes of that tune drifting over the Common.

    Behind the scenes, Selig arranged a three-way franchise swap. Henry would swap the Marlins for the Red Sox; Jeffrey Loria would swap the Expos for the Marlins; and MLB itself would buy and operate the Expos until the club could be contracted or re-sold at a huge profit to Washington, D.C. interests. The scheme still hinged on Henry's group winning the auction for the Red Sox...but with Selig's buddy John Harrington handling the sale, that was easily arranged.

    Attorney General Thomas Reilly minced no words in describing what happened. "Major League Baseball was calling the shots here." he declared after a meeting with Harrington. "This was a bag job," he proclaimed after another week of meetings. "It's very clear from this process there were no rules. The rules were changed hour by hour, bidder by bidder."



    It was a simple but effective scheme. Just decide in advance who was to win the auction, then rush the Designated Winners through MLB's approval process and use their head start as an excuse to reject clearly superior bids. To placate Attorney General Reilly, Harrington and the Henry/Werner group agreed to give the Yawkey Trust another $30 million -- a small price to pay for subverting the auction process and keeping the Sox in hands friendly to Selig.

    http://roadsidephotos.sabr.org/baseball/bb02-1.htm

    you don't have to agree with all that to agree with my point roy

    which was only to say RSN should appreciate his conduct during the sale






    More on Selig.

    I think he's honestly tried to improve the game

    we agree there

     there is no question in my mind

    that bud loves the same game we do




    I'm not a big fan of what I've read on the proposed upcoming changes, so we'll see how it turns out.

    me neither, but i think that was coming from the players


    2. WBC -- I'm against the WBC because there's no good time for it using major league players. But Selig's intentions with should be applauded.

    fair enough



     But as for "FO for cheating MLB from growing," what the he!! does that mean.

    I imagine you don't like the word cheating


    but IMO they did cheat  the luxury tax / growth of BB

     with beckett & agon contracts






    (It's not like every the Yankees have done are always in the best interests of the game overall).

    LOL roy

    talk about quiting while you're ahead


     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from OhEFFU. Show OhEFFU's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    Who is the DH rule unfair to?  What would be unfair is if one team could use it and another team couldn't (in the same game), and that obviously doesn't happen.  And if you're gonna list reasons why he's the worst, you should stick to things that aren't true of other commissioners - but the DH didn't start under Selig, as you know (I assume).

    As for the all-star game and the world series, home field advantage used to alternate - what could be more arbitrary than that?  Putting a little real intrigue into the all-star game seems a great idea to me.  I don't understand why people are saying "it's just an exhibition game."  Maybe you wish it were, but it's not "just" that anymore.  For any team that makes it to the WS, whether or not they got HMA used to be random (due to the alternating); now they can have a very small affect on it (via how their all-stats perform in the all-star game).  If you are concerned with fairness, as you seem to be, isn't it more fair to be have a small opportunity  to earn HMA, instead of having it or not based on pure chance?
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from betterredthandead. Show betterredthandead's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    The teams turned a blind eye and allowed it.

    You drank and then got into a car and drove drunk. Those that turned a blind eye have no responsiblity. You need to go to jail, just like the doping members of the MLBPA who refused to allow testing.

    The MLBPA is 100% responsible for taking drugs. No one else took the drugs or has any obligation to commit them to detox units.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    In Response to Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?:
    [QUOTE]The teams turned a blind eye and allowed it. You drank and then got into a car and drove drunk. Those that turned a blind eye have no responsiblity. You need to go to jail, just like the doping members of the MLBPA who refused to allow testing. The MLBPA is 100% responsible for taking drugs. No one else took the drugs or has any obligation to commit them to detox units.
    Posted by betterredthandead[/QUOTE]

    I always thought Bud was spineless when he didn't decide to NOT recognize some of the records broken in the '90s; there was also the AS "tie" a few yrs back; and he looked particularly feeble when getting admonished by Congress (and it was pathetic all around that they had to try to intervene) in '05; he's obviously the owner's puppet. Also, I expect to see a few teams go belly up soon (in all sports, except football, which currently has their own problems).
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from royf19. Show royf19's posts

    Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?

    In Response to Re: Bud Selig, worst commissioner in baseball history?:
    [QUOTE]greetings roy Some good points but, you should have quit while your ahead. LOL wait till you read my response to #2 1. DH -- I agree. The NL doesn't want it and the Players Union won't give up those jobs, which are still higher paying overall, in the AL. This has nothing to do with Selig. that's right, the nl doesn't want to add the money and the union won't give it up I have NP with it other than during interleauge I believe the NL is the only place in the world where they don't have the DH 3. Using the All-Star game for home field advantage is idiotic. The All-Star game is an exhibition that's it. It's ridiculous to use it for anything else. Entirely too much was made for the tied score a few years back. It was the only one in All-Star history not weather related and it was a huge overreaction. What the reaction should have been was simple -- just put an innings limit (let's say 12) for the All-Star game. The managers can then use their pitchers appropriately, and realistically, if they did that, how many ties would there be? How many extra innings games have there been. I know you are saying they did too,  but you are clearly mixing apples with oranges I agree they over reacted and I think the 12 inning limit is a great idea but if you keep in mind the old way  I see NP with the winner wining HF not saying it's a great  or the best way but nothing to trash the guy over 4.  Your comment about not allowing the Sox go to the highest bidder is ignorant. The so-called highest bid was smoke and mirrors. There were some conditions as I recall and wasn't sound financially. Plus either that bid or another bid was done after the bids were finalized. The Sox bid was the best when you look at how financially sound it is. And that hardly was unique to the Sox sale. There have been other sales where the financial stability of the bid cause it not to be accepted even if it was a higher dollar amount. The only thing Selig did was encourage Henry to join forces with Werner and Lucchino. And remember -- one of the bidders was McCourt. Selig was right in not accepting McCourt's bid. Where he messed up was letting McCourt buy the Dodgers despite questionable finances even back then. ignorant seems a tad strong roy here's another ignorant opinion It was time for Commissioner Selig's game of musical franchises. Enter Florida Marlins owner John Henry. When Henry bought the Marlins in 1998, he inherited the terrible stadium lease former owner Wayne Huizenga had "negotiated" with himself for the Marlins. Henry vowed to build a new park with his own money if necessary...but within a year or two he was saying, "Well, I'll use my own funds if I must, but if I do there won't be any money left to sign players, so can't the taxpayers spare a few hundred million?" Keep listening for the first notes of that tune drifting over the Common. Behind the scenes, Selig arranged a three-way franchise swap. Henry would swap the Marlins for the Red Sox; Jeffrey Loria would swap the Expos for the Marlins; and MLB itself would buy and operate the Expos until the club could be contracted or re-sold at a huge profit to Washington, D.C. interests. The scheme still hinged on Henry's group winning the auction for the Red Sox...but with Selig's buddy John Harrington handling the sale, that was easily arranged. Attorney General Thomas Reilly minced no words in describing what happened. "Major League Baseball was calling the shots here." he declared after a meeting with Harrington. "This was a bag job," he proclaimed after another week of meetings. "It's very clear from this process there were no rules. The rules were changed hour by hour, bidder by bidder." It was a simple but effective scheme. Just decide in advance who was to win the auction, then rush the Designated Winners through MLB's approval process and use their head start as an excuse to reject clearly superior bids. To placate Attorney General Reilly, Harrington and the Henry/Werner group agreed to give the Yawkey Trust another $30 million -- a small price to pay for subverting the auction process and keeping the Sox in hands friendly to Selig. http://roadsidephotos.sabr.org/baseball/bb02-1.htm you don't have to agree with all that to agree with my point roy which was only to say RSN should appreciate his conduct during the sale More on Selig. I think he's honestly tried to improve the game we agree there  there is no question in my mind that bud loves the same game we do I'm not a big fan of what I've read on the proposed upcoming changes, so we'll see how it turns out. me neither, but i think that was coming from the players 2. WBC -- I'm against the WBC because there's no good time for it using major league players. But Selig's intentions with should be applauded. fair enough  But as for "FO for cheating MLB from growing," what the he!! does that mean. I imagine you don't like the word cheating but IMO they did cheat  the luxury tax / growth of BB  with beckett & agon contracts (It's not like every the Yankees have done are always in the best interests of the game overall). LOL roy talk about quiting while you're ahead
    Posted by pinstripezac32[/QUOTE]

    Bold comment -- you're right, it was a bit strong. My apologies.

    The fact is however, the Henry-Werner bid was the best bid. Yes. Selig did help orchestrate Henry getting involved with the Red Sox because of the Loria situation. (Henry was rightly disenchanted with the Marlins' situation). But his job as commissioner is to do what's in the best interests of baseball. Cleaning up the Expos situation and having a strong ownership group in Boston is in the best interest. 

    However, there was no guarantee that the Henry group was going to win.

    That quote you brought up from O'Reilly has proven to be false by numerous looks into it the situation. Just because a politician blows smoke, it doesn't mean there's a fire. In fact, there usually isn't.

    The fact is, there was a process, the last bid that forced the extra $30M was after the bids were due was because of Reilly's interference. Reilly was the typical Boston politician. The only reason he got involved wasn't because he was trying to look out for the charity. He got involved because his boy, Joe O'Donnell the local bidder who was a political supporter of Reilly's in the 1998 election, lost the bid.

    Reilly was all over the map.

    Early in the process, he said this: "The highest bidder is one factor. It's not the only factor. John Harrington will have a lot to say about who the next owner is because the Yawkeys wanted it that way."

    When his political backer (financial backer) wasn't the highest bidder, he started singing a different tune.

    Because Reilly delayed the process after the bids were in, it allowed Dolan and Prentice to up their bids. Even Reilly realized that there were only two groups who submitted bids with financing in place.

    The $30M really was nothing but political extortion. The late bids by Dolan and Prentice would have netted the charities the $30M so the Henry group agreed to start a foundation and fund it with $30M over the next 10 years.

    The Henry Group was willing to walk away and let Reilly try to find a bidder that would come up with more money for the team that could be financed. Funny how Reilly didn't do that.

    As has been reported:

    If the O'Donnell-Karp group had put together a full financed bid;

    or 

    Had the Prentice group been able to secrure approval for his funders before the Dec. 20 deadline;

    or 

    Had the Dolan group not leaked information that he intended to buy the entire team (at first, only the Yawkey Trust shares were up for sale) (Dolan also had other issues with financing as I recall);

    Then one of these groups might have won the process.



    As for the contracts -- how is that cheating. The Red Sox were hardly the first baseball team to hold off on signing a player because of the luxury tax. And that's done all the time in football.

    And like I said, the Yankees have always used the rules, money, resources to their advantage and I've never called them out on it because I know the Red Sox (well-managed teams in general) do the same thing. To use a worn-out cliche, it would be the pot calling the kettle black. 
     

Share