BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from psychofool. Show psychofool's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    Stroke my ego? Manic bluster? Wtf are you talking about?

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from pumpsie-green. Show pumpsie-green's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    In response to psychofool's comment:

    "Just keeping it real," my brother. Sorry one of the mods couldn't take my post. They're funny about whta gets under their skins and what doesn't.

    Btw I am not Pike, buddy. But you can call me Troll1 if you want.

     



    OK. I will call you Troll 1. You were warned once by BosoxJoe5. I am warning you one more time. Stop coming in here and flaming the forum. I do not think you are Pike (or you would already be banned), but whoever you are, behave yourself or you will have to change your name to History.

    WE ARE ALL JUST POPPYSEEDS IN THE BAKERY OF LIFE

     

     
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  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from SFBostonFan. Show SFBostonFan's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    psychofool's pen name aptly fits for he/she is indeed a fool !!!


     


    Thank you redsoxdirtdog for the following :


     


    Yes! Not withstanding the despicable actions of a minority of military people who commit sexual assaults, at the SAME RATE AS THEIR contemporaries in the civilian population, those who have served HONORABLY are all heroes. It's sad that some feel the overwhelming need to drag entire groups into the mud by means of guilt by association! 


     


    This discussion was for many a catharsis of emotions and feelings of despair built up by many and bravely posted to online, albeit pen name posters, friendships made among fellow Sox fans. Hoorah I say to all who posted their troubled situations that almost led to suicide. You are truly brave and I hope it helped you being able to share your experiences.


    When I said all our troops are heroes, and it was mentioned by another poster, Viet Nam was not a popular war and there was a draft. There were no Nazi subs in New York Harbor or Japanese subs in San Francisco Bay where our homeland was threatened.


    I was not Gung Ho and although I didn't feel I was a coward and, although afraid many times, I never displayed cowardice and the main reason was not to display it in front of my fellow troop friends. Yup, in despair, many smoked marijuana and other stuff which had a adverse affect on them in civilian life.


    Some did but I didn't volunteer for the military. If one was classified as 1A and not 4F, one could avoid the draft as long as one was in school. But, otherwise, one who didn't honor the call, would go to jail or could escape over the border to Canada. We honored the duty call and did what was expected as Patriots and put our lives on the line for our country...yup,  WE WERE HEROES !!! 


     


     


     


     

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from BogieAt12oclock. Show BogieAt12oclock's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    In response to psychofool's comment:

    "Just keeping it real," my brother. Sorry one of the mods couldn't take my post. They're funny about whta gets under their skins and what doesn't.

    Btw I am not Pike, buddy. But you can call me Troll1 if you want.

     



    But you are a psycho and a fool. If you're not pike, you're definitely his clone.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from pumpsie-green. Show pumpsie-green's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    Psychofool: instead of banning you I just blocked your last post. Look, this is a popular and serious thread and I am not going to allow you to turn it into your own personal b!tching session. You want to do that start another thread.

    WE ARE ALL JUST POPPYSEEDS IN THE BAKERY OF LIFE

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from BostonTrollSpanker. Show BostonTrollSpanker's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    Burrito - 


    just catching up on posts...


    but wanted to thank you for your honesty and while I participate in this forum mostly to talk baseball and get away from my life it's good to know you can speak up if you need to and hopefully from the response you have seen that these people do give a care. 


    I'm not going to confide to that level here, not really the place I would do that, but I will say I have lost friends to suicide and I have had to live with what I could have done differently. In my own life I can relate to your story and have seen ups and downs and, to quote James Taylor, "lonely times when I could not find a friend."


    I do believe that in almost all cases where it seems there is no hope or chances of a better shift that things can shift. That means hang in there. It takes guts to stick it out but work hard on yourself and pursue your dreams even in the darkest times and you may find yourself in a better place. 


    In the meantime I hope you get some welcome distraction here and I'm sure there are plenty of folks here who would do what they could whenever you needed it. 


    cheers from Massachusetts


     


      

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from BostonTrollSpanker. Show BostonTrollSpanker's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    p.s. pumpsie great job co-moderating so far, thx man

      
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    In response to SFBostonFan's comment:

    I am a combat Vet from Viet Nam. Two of my best buddies committed suicide and one in his 50s and another in his 60s some 40-45 years after they served but lived with Demons/Nightmares and PTSD(post tramatic stress disorder). We were in some battles that we didn’t know minute to minute whether we would survive. We carried wounded and dead on our backs to helicopters as Marines don’t like to leave anyone behind. We ran through rice patties with bullets spraying water on our faces. These 2 buddies were 2 of the bravest men I have ever served with.

     

     

     

    Viet Nam was a horrible war in that when we returned home there was little celebration/parades etc. and many times we were spit at and called baby killers. We were told not to fire into areas where there were civilians but the Viet Cong hid behind women & children & fired at us. It was a tough transition back into civilian life because of the widespread Jane Fonda type protests against the war. Many Vets had trouble getting jobs and were homeless and hated. The stigma attached to Vietnam made some veterans reluctant to immediately seek the help they needed when they first returned from service. Troops today from Iraq & Afghan get heroes welcomes. I say today, irrespective of one’s political differences, respect our troops because they are all heroes. Every day, based on the fear that some other friends might do as two buddies did, and as we are getting older and our health & mobility is declining and this feeds feelings of loneliness and isolation, I interact with depressed friends and tell them we are patriots/heroes irrespective of the unpopular war. A bullet in Viet Nam could have killed us as one on the beaches of Normandy or Iwo Jima. It has been said that people who commit suicide are cowards. The combat experiences we endured were not done by cowards. The best remedy in addition to therapy and some medication available at the VA is to be cared for and friendship. I say friendship/family and interaction with people because I have had my battles and constantly fought the impulse to join my friends. I am not afraid of death but I am afraid of the devastation it would cause those who love me. Mingle, be active, engage in sports with friends, tennis, biking, hiking, softball, bowling etc. Realize that life is a gift...appreciate it and enjoy for if you believe, you'll see your friends again in time shorter than you think.




    [object HTMLDivElement]

    +10000000

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    In response to dannycater's comment:

    Wow, this is quite a thread...A lot of brave people and a lot of tortured souls. It's an honor to chat with all of you.




    [object HTMLDivElement]

    A European once wrote that only Americans are born with a belief that they will have a happy life.  Maybe the issue is that we don't have context.  When you grow up in some areas of the world, everything around you is pretty miserable, so maybe your circumstances don't seem as bad.

    In America, for all the newspaper stories, most people have it okay.  So when you get hit by problems, maybe there is a sense of 'why can't I be happy like everyone else?'.

    Streeam of consciousness alert, but I grew up with no money.  I had a great family, a fine parochiol school nearby, great maybe middleclass neighborhood, so it is not a woe-is-me story, but having no money growing up makes it a heck of a lot easier for me to be happy with what I have.

    So I wonder if there is a difference between those that start off on top of the food chain, and those on the bottom, on how life reaches its fulfillment stages.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from dannycater. Show dannycater's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    JB, sometimes I wonder if that applies to professional sports athletes. Some come from well-to-do families and many have come from a meager existence. In both cases, there are plenty of sad stories where the spotlight of pro sports and/or the immediate presence of a great deal of money after not so much 'till age 20something can really do damage to the psyche. We just make the assumption that a guy making 83 million dollars in a contract should be "happy" or "content." Maybe they should, but a lot of baggage (mostly negative) goes with the money tag.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from 67redsox. Show 67redsox's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    In response to SFBostonFan's comment:

    Amazing that this post came out this 3rd week in August which, in effect, is National Friendship Week and although with our bogus/pen names we are in real life anonymous to each other unless some have agreed in private emails to meet outside the interaction of the forum, that the outpouring of caring and friendship for fellow posters is incredible.

     

    I wish to share with you the following. Snopes says the story is legend but I like it anyway.

     

    One day, when I was a freshman in high school, I saw a kid from my class was walking home from school. His name was Kyle. It looked like he was carrying all of his books. I thought to myself, "Why would anyone bring home all his books on a Friday? He must really be a nerd." I had quite a weekend planned (parties and a football game with my friend tomorrow afternoon), so I shrugged my shoulders and went on. As I was walking, I saw a bunch of kids running toward him. They ran at him, knocking all his books out of his arms and tripping him so he landed in the dirt. His glasses went flying, and I saw them land in the grass about ten feet from him. He looked up and I saw this terrible sadness in his eyes. My heart went out to him. So, I jogged over to him and as he crawled around looking for his glasses, and I saw a tear in his eye.

     

    As I handed him his glasses, I said, "Those guys are jerks. They really should get lives." He looked at me and said, "Hey thanks!" There was a big smile on his face. It was one of those smiles that showed real gratitude.

     

    I helped him pick up his books, and asked him where he lived. As it turned out, he lived near me, so I asked him why I had never seen him before. He said he had gone to private school before now. I would have never hung out with a private school kid before.

     

    We talked all the way home, and I carried his books. He turned out to be a pretty cool kid. I asked him if he wanted to play football on Saturday with me and my friends. He said yes. We hung all weekend and the more I got to know Kyle, the more I liked him. And my friends thought the same of him.

     

    Monday morning came, and there was Kyle with the huge stack of books again. I stopped him and said, "Damn boy, you are gonna really build some serious muscles with this pile of books everyday!" He just laughed and handed me half the books. Over the next four years, Kyle and I became best friends. When we were seniors, began to think about college. Kyle decided on Georgetown, and I was going to Duke. I knew that we would always be friends, that the smiles would never be a problem. He was going to be a doctor, and I was going for business on a football scholarship. Kyle was valedictorian of our class.

     

    I teased him all the time about being a nerd. He had to prepare a speech for graduation. I was so glad it wasn't me having to get up there and speak. Graduation day, I saw Kyle.

     

    He looked great. He was one of those guys that really found himself during high school. He filled out and actually looked good in glasses. He had more dates than me and all the girls loved him! Boy, sometimes I was jealous.

     

    Today was one of those days. I could see that he was nervous about his speech. So, I smacked him on the back and said, "Hey, big guy, you'll be great!" He looked at me with one of those looks (the really grateful one) and smiled. "Thanks," he said.

     

    As he started his speech, he cleared his throat, and began. "Graduation is a time to thank those who helped you make it through those tough years. Your parents, your teachers, your siblings, maybe a coach ... but mostly your friends. I am here to tell all of you that being a friend to someone is the best gift you can give them. I am going to tell you a story." I just looked at my friend with disbelief as he told the story of the first day we met. He had planned to kill himself over the weekend. He talked of how he had cleaned out his locker so his Mom wouldn't have to do it later and was carrying his stuff home. He looked hard at me and gave me a little smile. "Thankfully, I was saved. My friend saved me from doing the unspeakable." I heard the gasp go through the crowd as this handsome, popular boy told us all about his weakest moment.

     

    I saw his Mom and dad looking at me and smiling that same grateful smile. Not until that moment did I realize its depth. Never underestimate the power of your actions.

     

    With one small gesture you can change a person’s life. For better or for worse. God puts us all in each other’s lives to impact one another in some way. Look for God in others.




    Nice!

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from pumpsie-green. Show pumpsie-green's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:

    In response to dannycater's comment:

    Wow, this is quite a thread...A lot of brave people and a lot of tortured souls. It's an honor to chat with all of you.




    [object HTMLDivElement]

    A European once wrote that only Americans are born with a belief that they will have a happy life.  Maybe the issue is that we don't have context.  When you grow up in some areas of the world, everything around you is pretty miserable, so maybe your circumstances don't seem as bad.

    In America, for all the newspaper stories, most people have it okay.  So when you get hit by problems, maybe there is a sense of 'why can't I be happy like everyone else?'.

    Streeam of consciousness alert, but I grew up with no money.  I had a great family, a fine parochiol school nearby, great maybe middleclass neighborhood, so it is not a woe-is-me story, but having no money growing up makes it a heck of a lot easier for me to be happy with what I have.

    So I wonder if there is a difference between those that start off on top of the food chain, and those on the bottom, on how life reaches its fulfillment stages.



    I agree with you Joe. I also spent my early years growing up in a slum in Lynn MA. My sister was disabled due to a spinal cord injury at birth, so much of my parent's time was spend caring for her. I think that when you start off with very little you appreciate much much more what you have been given. Not a day goes by that I do not thank God for the conditions under which I now live (I am not a believer in organized religion, but one only has to look around and pay attention to see that a Greater Force exists). One of the main reasons I became a doctor is to help others...........you know, "there but for the grace of God go I". Each of us has a responsibility to help others in need wherever we can. Perhaps if someone had done that for our friend Rigatoni he would not have ended up with a knife in him.

    WE ARE ALL JUST POPPYSEEDS IN THE BAKERY OF LIFE

     

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from 67redsox. Show 67redsox's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:


    In response to dannycater's comment:


    Wow, this is quite a thread...A lot of brave people and a lot of tortured souls. It's an honor to chat with all of you.





    [object HTMLDivElement]


    A European once wrote that only Americans are born with a belief that they will have a happy life.  Maybe the issue is that we don't have context.  When you grow up in some areas of the world, everything around you is pretty miserable, so maybe your circumstances don't seem as bad.


    In America, for all the newspaper stories, most people have it okay.  So when you get hit by problems, maybe there is a sense of 'why can't I be happy like everyone else?'.


    Streeam of consciousness alert, but I grew up with no money.  I had a great family, a fine parochiol school nearby, great maybe middleclass neighborhood, so it is not a woe-is-me story, but having no money growing up makes it a heck of a lot easier for me to be happy with what I have.


    So I wonder if there is a difference between those that start off on top of the food chain, and those on the bottom, on how life reaches its fulfillment stages.





    Interesting perspective.  I think joy comes from within not your circumstances in life.  I grew up very poor and now I'm very comfortable.  My sorrows and my joys don't come from what I have or what I don't have.  


    We all should live the best life we can but in the end we don't control all the circumstances of our lives.  We can eat right, exercise and do all the right things then get struck down by cancer.  I was doing all the right things when I was hit with a tough medical condition that is taking years to heal and recover from, not cancer BTW. However my mother and her two sisters died of cancer so the big "C" is definitely part of my gene pool.


    For me true peace and joy comes from my faith.  I try to accept the circumstances of my life, the good and the bad, knowing that God has a plan that I may not understand.  Since He is God and I'm not I trust His will for me. My ultimate goal is Heaven and since my journey on this earth is short and eternity is long I keep my eye on the prize.


    You grew up with love. That's worth more than all the money in the world!

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from dannycater. Show dannycater's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    I don't think I've ever been "rich," but I'm sure happy to have a great wife, children (and grandchildren) and I never thought I'd ever own a home in a nice area/city, but I do now. Hard work mostly, extra jobs, but bottom line is it's almost better to start off poor (my family was easily lower middle class at best, but no electricity and food stamps at times) and not have things, then the opposite. Going to 1 Sox game and 1 hockey game is a treat for me. I don't know how it correlates to happiness in the future for the rich kids v. the not so rich.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from 67redsox. Show 67redsox's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    In response to dannycater's comment:

    I don't think I've ever been "rich," but I'm sure happy to have a great wife, children (and grandchildren) and I never thought I'd ever own a home in a nice area/city, but I do now. Hard work mostly, extra jobs, but bottom line is it's almost better to start off poor (my family was easily lower middle class at best, but no electricity and food stamps at times) and not have things, then the opposite. Going to 1 Sox game and 1 hockey game is a treat for me. I don't know how it correlates to happiness in the future for the rich kids v. the not so rich.




    You are a very rich man, you have all that really matters!  You family is also rich to have a wonder man like you.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    For me true peace and joy comes from my faith. I try to accept the circumstances of my life, the good and the bad, knowing that God has a plan that I may not understand. Since He is God and I'm not I trust his Will for me.

    Religious people are usually happier than non-religious for this reason.  For those that believe, the Bible says 'He takes care of teh birds in the sky, so why wouldn't He take care of us'.

    I also like the people I associate with more at the church and school.  I don't think you need to believe in God to be a nice person, but the people at the church and school have far less drama in their lives.

    Just a story, but I use to hit a vegetarian place downtown run by 7th Day Adventists.  I don't know much about them, but they were just the calmest people I have ever seen.  There is a lot to be said about not needing to clear the table of every possible nickel and dime.

     

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from redsoxdirtdog. Show redsoxdirtdog's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:


    For me true peace and joy comes from my faith. I try to accept the circumstances of my life, the good and the bad, knowing that God has a plan that I may not understand. Since He is God and I'm not I trust his Will for me.


    Religious people are usually happier than non-religious for this reason.  For those that believe, the Bible says 'He takes care of teh birds in the sky, so why wouldn't He take care of us'.


    I also like the people I associate with more at the church and school.  I don't think you need to believe in God to be a nice person, but the people at the church and school have far less drama in their lives.


    Just a story, but I use to hit a vegetarian place downtown run by 7th Day Adventists.  I don't know much about them, but they were just the calmest people I have ever seen.  There is a lot to be said about not needing to clear the table of every possible nickel and dime.


     






    And they happen to think "the Catholic Church IS Satin."


    Nice, BUT TRULY NUTTY!


    NOT AN ANECDOTAL OBSERVATION!  LOOK IT UP...

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    .........you know, "there but for the grace of God go I". Each of us has a responsibility to help others in need wherever we can. Perhaps if someone had done that for our friend Rigatoni he would not have ended up with a knife in him.


    Two of my favorites there.


    1-I've probably done about half the stupid things a kid could do.  It's probably my upbringing, but for some reason, none of them stuck.  So when I see others that have ruined their lives, I know it is just dumb luck that I am not in that position.  Certainly nothing I ever did to get out of the way of speeding trains.


    2-It's good to have these serious conversations once in a while, and I'm glad Burrito had the coconuts to bring it up.  I've noticed this about raising kids.  No matter what you think about your kids, everyone else thinks the same thing about their kids.  Life is rewarding, but not always a walk in the park.


    3-In that regard, I also ignore people who are in a foul mood, without necessarily judging them.  Everyone will get to the point where they have simply had enough.  if someone is cranky with me, it is almost always because my snarky attitude was the last of many snarky incidences during the day.  if you ignore it, chances are that all will be well tomorrow.


     

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    And they happen to think "the Catholic Church IS Satin."


    Nice, BUT TRULY NUTTY!


    NOT AN ANECDOTAL OBSERVATION! LOOK IT UP...

    I did not know that, but I wouldn't hold it against them anyway.  Religious beliefs can be odd things sometimes.  I'm a practicing Catholic, but still question their views on gays and on women priests and married priests.

     

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from dannycater. Show dannycater's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:


    For me true peace and joy comes from my faith. I try to accept the circumstances of my life, the good and the bad, knowing that God has a plan that I may not understand. Since He is God and I'm not I trust his Will for me.


    Religious people are usually happier than non-religious for this reason.  For those that believe, the Bible says 'He takes care of teh birds in the sky, so why wouldn't He take care of us'.


    I also like the people I associate with more at the church and school.  I don't think you need to believe in God to be a nice person, but the people at the church and school have far less drama in their lives.


    Just a story, but I use to hit a vegetarian place downtown run by 7th Day Adventists.  I don't know much about them, but they were just the calmest people I have ever seen.  There is a lot to be said about not needing to clear the table of every possible nickel and dime.


     




    I'm not religious, don't go to church or temple, but the guy in the story about my car accident is a church-goer and I think it had a lot to do with him taking responsibility, explaining his situation but not as a ploy, and then paying what he owed. Not saying a non-religious guy wouldn't have done the same, but I think it made a difference in his in own mind as to what is right and wrong. I use "god" a lot in sentence when i'm hoping for something or wanting something to happen (Pats score a TD for instance, Thank God For Brady), but I do not practice religion. However, I practice good morals and showing respect and earning respect and expecting respect in return, and try to teach common sense and the right thing to do to my children...maybe that is my form of religion.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from redsoxdirtdog. Show redsoxdirtdog's posts

    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:

    And they happen to think "the Catholic Church IS Satin."


    Nice, BUT TRULY NUTTY!


    NOT AN ANECDOTAL OBSERVATION! LOOK IT UP...

    I did not know that, but I wouldn't hold it against them anyway.  Religious beliefs can be odd things sometimes.  I'm a practicing Catholic, but still question their views on gays and on women priests and married priests.

     




    No worries, but check out the seminars they routinely put on about the Catholic church.

    As you say, all religions have their problems, and think the others are dead wrong.  Goes with the territory....   BUT!

    When one church actively is engaged in a religion that preaches that another church "IS SATIN, NOT JUST LEAD ASTRAY BY, BUT IS SATIN, I immediately walk the other way.

    As for how a church treats gays, I can assure you that the Catholic church is one of the most open.  Yes!  Church doctrine is not open to the lifestyle, but 90% of the parishioners are, which speaks volumes about how THE CHURCH itself does NOT routinely preach against gays as so many other churches do, especially evangelicals and 7th dayers.

    Again.....  this is beyond anecdotal.

    Please 67, no theological debate on this subject, as all I'm saying is that Catholics, to their credit, do not by and large try to play God, and judge gays.  That is a compliment, so let's leave it at that.  Please!

     

    I DON'T WANT TO CHANGE THE SUBJECT!!!!!

    Yes!  A belief in God can most certainly help with depression and despair!  Knowing that "God Has your back, especially when you're down & out, can be an incredible comfort. However........  There most certainly are some nut-jobs out there. Discernment is a must!

     
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    Re: BurritoT comes clean (on suicide)

    In response to 67redsox's comment:



     




    In response to dannycater's comment:




    I don't think I've ever been "rich," but I'm sure happy to have a great wife, children (and grandchildren) and I never thought I'd ever own a home in a nice area/city, but I do now. Hard work mostly, extra jobs, but bottom line is it's almost better to start off poor (my family was easily lower middle class at best, but no electricity and food stamps at times) and not have things, then the opposite. Going to 1 Sox game and 1 hockey game is a treat for me. I don't know how it correlates to happiness in the future for the rich kids v. the not so rich.




     






    You are a very rich man, you have all that really matters!  You family is also rich to have a wonder man like you. 


     


     





    I never really knew the definition of being rich...I guess financially rich means not needing to work to enjoy all that you want materially.  But as 67 redsox comments, you can be rich being at peace with yourself, having the love of family and friends etc. and thanking God you are fairly healthy and able to stay above the turf without demons haunting you to end your life.


     


    I do not feel that there are many who could love America more than I and its democratic system that allowed me via hard work, many sacrifices and an education to live the American dream and I, in effect, retired comfortably at age 65. My father came to this country practically illiterate with a 4th grade education in Italy as he was needed along with his siblings to work. He came to the US at age 16 with $5.00 in his pocket. On the boat from Napoli someone asked him to cut his hair so passing through Ellis Island in NY he was asked what was his profession and he responded “barber". He told me in the 20s and during the big recession, he’d get $.10-$.15 per haircut and maybe $.20-$.25 including a shave, $.05 was a huge tip. I recall when I was in High School in the late 50s his rate was $2.00-$2.50 per haircut. My ghetto neighborhood in Portland, Maine was filled with 90% ethnic Italians, Irish & Poles and we had gangs & street fights but the Catholic religion/parochial schools/church etc. really kept us from killing eachother---there were no knifes, guns etc. in those days, only fists !!!


     


    I worked while in grade school in the summers on my knees cutting lettuce & picking blueberries & strawberries for so much per basket. Also, I washed dishes in restaurants. I worked while in college, at home during holidays and in the summers. Fortunately, joining the Marine Reserves on my 17th birthday and attending weekly meetings, weekends too and 2 weeks in the summer, I used to get a very helpful $25.00-$30.00 per month. My only choice for college was our land grant University with no tuition required. Upon graduation I completed my draft obligation & went to work. I thank God for the sacrifices my parents and grandparents too, who helped financially, that enabled me to be successful & prosper in our beloved America. Yup, as a Septuagenarian, and I have felt this way for a long time, I can come to the East Coast, visit family, go to all Boston teams games & then return to the coast & do the same here with local teams, eat at great restaurants, travel to the land of my roots, Italia, and play senior USTA tennis and interact with friends,  I FEEL RICH !!!


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     


     

     
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