Chemistry, human nature, and pay

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from scauma09. Show scauma09's posts

    Chemistry, human nature, and pay

    There's no denying this is a tight knit group of guys these Red Sox. Much can be said about the sum be greater than it's part in explaining why this team has been so good for the majority of the season. It's tough to say what exactly goes into creating such great team chemistry, personality is one but could pay be another? General thought was the sox overpaid for a few guys last offseason, but let's admit, who doesn't enjoy going to work when your very happy with your compensation? That's just human nature for all of us. Not only is money a great motivator, like in a contract year, it also has a lot to do with our general happiness. I doubt it has a huge impact on chemistry but it probably does come into play. Didn't ortiz make a comment a few years back about the sox signing expensive players outside the organization? Or in other words, where's our money? These guys spend a lot of time together and I'm sure didn't conversations get had my different teammates. Just seems like keeping everyone monetarily happy is smart business

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: Chemistry, human nature, and pay

    1-My guess is that they are all competitive, hard workers, and nice guys.  I think people are genetically designed to create chemistry.  I think it is the exception, rather than the rule, to have people that don't get along.  Most of the places I've worked at, everyone got along.

    2-In BB, I think there is a lot to be said about just getting out of the way.  In the other three majors, everything is done as a team.  A coach has to be intrically involved.  There is practice in BB, but pretty much everyone knows what to do.  Not that there is no coaching, but I think the level of coaching is muted, and you mostly want to create an environment where the players want to be there.

    3-And at the end of the day, winning helps a lot.  There are not a lot of unhappy winners, and not a lot of happy losers.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from notin. Show notin's posts

    Re: Chemistry, human nature, and pay

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:

    1-My guess is that they are all competitive, hard workers, and nice guys.  I think people are genetically designed to create chemistry.  I think it is the exception, rather than the rule, to have people that don't get along.  Most of the places I've worked at, everyone got along.

    2-In BB, I think there is a lot to be said about just getting out of the way.  In the other three majors, everything is done as a team.  A coach has to be intrically involved.  There is practice in BB, but pretty much everyone knows what to do.  Not that there is no coaching, but I think the level of coaching is muted, and you mostly want to create an environment where the players want to be there.

    3-And at the end of the day, winning helps a lot.  There are not a lot of unhappy winners, and not a lot of happy losers.




    Really, that is why I believe winning breeds chemistry and no the other way around.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: Chemistry, human nature, and pay

    3-And at the end of the day, winning helps a lot.  There are not a lot of unhappy winners, and not a lot of happy losers.

     




    Really, that is why I believe winning breeds chemistry and no the other way around.

     

    That's what I have always believed, but I think this year has changed my thinking a little bit.

    Sox4ever

     
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  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re: Chemistry, human nature, and pay

    The other day I heard a discussion on sports radio that revolved around Gomes and a couple of the other new players acquired by the sox. Apparently..the whole beard thing this year originated from Gomes who is a big believer in these types of activities which build comraderie. From a group dynamic perspective, it is not winning that breed chemistry at all..it's this kind of comraderie that builds winning teams..and builds them for the long term. When you have a team that is functioning as a unit it gives you the edge every day of the week. Talent takes you far in sports...but chemistry always gives you the edge in team sports.

    We saw something similar in the 2004 Sox team. I think we all  knew when the Sox started the beard thing that they were punching a ticket to the post season.

    "It is not down in any map...trueplaces never are...." ( Melville)

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Chemistry, human nature, and pay

    In response to moonslav59's comment:

    3-And at the end of the day, winning helps a lot.  There are not a lot of unhappy winners, and not a lot of happy losers.

     




    Really, that is why I believe winning breeds chemistry and no the other way around.

     

    That's what I have always believed, but I think this year has changed my thinking a little bit.

    Sox4ever



    That's good. Never underestimate the human element.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from J-BAY. Show J-BAY's posts

    Re: Chemistry, human nature, and pay

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Chemistry, human nature, and pay

    In response to scauma09's comment:

    There's no denying this is a tight knit group of guys these Red Sox. Much can be said about the sum be greater than it's part in explaining why this team has been so good for the majority of the season. It's tough to say what exactly goes into creating such great team chemistry, personality is one but could pay be another? General thought was the sox overpaid for a few guys last offseason, but let's admit, who doesn't enjoy going to work when your very happy with your compensation? That's just human nature for all of us. Not only is money a great motivator, like in a contract year, it also has a lot to do with our general happiness. I doubt it has a huge impact on chemistry but it probably does come into play. Didn't ortiz make a comment a few years back about the sox signing expensive players outside the organization? Or in other words, where's our money? These guys spend a lot of time together and I'm sure didn't conversations get had my different teammates. Just seems like keeping everyone monetarily happy is smart business



    People may enjoy being well compensated, but it doesn't necessarily lead to doing a better job. Many times failure is too well rewarded.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from 37stories. Show 37stories's posts

    Re: Chemistry, human nature, and pay

    In response to RedSoxFireman's comment:

    Just seems like keeping everyone monetarily happy is smart business

    False. Player character isn't related to "monetary happy". 



    Good games by Ortiz and Ells today.

    Don't you think?

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from tomnev. Show tomnev's posts

    Re: Chemistry, human nature, and pay

    There is something to be said for having guys who just love the game.....not just guys who are good at it and thats why they play it, but really love it.....according to Gomes, Farrell and others, since ST, these guys have talked baseball 24-7......they loe it and they live it.....that type of attitude breeds winning and then the winning spreads the attitude......which is why the Ben C signings were right on the money.

     
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