Cody Ross?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from charliedarling. Show charliedarling's posts

    Cody Ross?

    I liked Cody's year as a Red Sox player.  He played hard, seemed very upbeat in a year where there was lots of misery and gloom, he drove in a good number of runs and hit 22 HRs even if he struck out quite a bit and really didn't have a sparkling BA or OBP.

    There was not way the Sox could have made him a qualifying offer yesterday, but I could see bringing him back for a 2 year deal at maybe $7M per year.

    Now the question is, what is Ross going to do?  I personally think that he will have to get an offer well above whatever the Sox offer to even consider going anywhere else because there is absolutely not a better park for Ross to call home than Fenway.

    I can see his HRs total falling back to the mid teens in just about any other city because even though there are some good parks for right handed hitters out there there are none like Fenway for such a dead pull, fly ball hitter like Ross.

    Cody, take a look at what happened to the last guy who was a hitter like you in Fenway-Jason Bay.  Bay fell apart when he took the big money from the NY Mets (bigger park) and has never been the same since.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Iceman4. Show Iceman4's posts

    Re: Cody Ross?

    Anybody have Cody's numbers outside Fenway?

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from TitleTown11. Show TitleTown11's posts

    Re: Cody Ross?

    From Baseball Reference

     

    Home 0.298/0.356/0.565 w/ 13 HRs & 49 RBIs

    Away 0.232/0.294/0.390 w/ 9 HRs & 32 RBIs

     

    One other notable H/A split is doubles (25/9)

     

     
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  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from jasko2248. Show jasko2248's posts

    Re: Cody Ross?

    In response to charliedarling's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I liked Cody's year as a Red Sox player.  He played hard, seemed very upbeat in a year where there was lots of misery and gloom, he drove in a good number of runs and hit 22 HRs even if he struck out quite a bit and really didn't have a sparkling BA or OBP.

    There was not way the Sox could have made him a qualifying offer yesterday, but I could see bringing him back for a 2 year deal at maybe $7M per year.

    Now the question is, what is Ross going to do?  I personally think that he will have to get an offer well above whatever the Sox offer to even consider going anywhere else because there is absolutely not a better park for Ross to call home than Fenway.

    I can see his HRs total falling back to the mid teens in just about any other city because even though there are some good parks for right handed hitters out there there are none like Fenway for such a dead pull, fly ball hitter like Ross.

    Cody, take a look at what happened to the last guy who was a hitter like you in Fenway-Jason Bay.  Bay fell apart when he took the big money from the NY Mets (bigger park) and has never been the same since.

    [/QUOTE]

    Cody lives in Arizona and has a wife and young kids.  There's a lot of talk that while he likes Boston, he'd rather play for a team on the West Coast or at least a team that has Spring Training in Arizona.  My guess is that the Giants would have some interest, as well as some other teams, including Arizona.   

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from dgalehouse. Show dgalehouse's posts

    Re: Cody Ross?

    Cody Ross is an average player.  Cheerful , but average.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from notin. Show notin's posts

    Re: Cody Ross?

    3yr/$27mill is insane for a short side platoon player.

     

    But that deal won't kill the Sox.  If anything, it might prevent them from making other deals that will...

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from parhunter55. Show parhunter55's posts

    Re: Cody Ross?

    I liked Cody Ross as our LFer, but his bat can be replaced.  I hope he is happy wherever he ends up.  If I were him, I'd look to move back to the west coast, and I know SF will have some interest.  He was quite successful there as well.

     

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from georom4. Show georom4's posts

    Re: Cody Ross?

    how many good players are we going to let go because the grass is always greener? ross with a big raise is still a good deal..and they guy was clutch and not an ingrate...another constipated ben moment.....

     

    hey ben this is a very easy off season thanks to magic johnson....resign your two best clutch hitters (papi/ross) and get the best starter that will make lester/buch step up their game (grienke ROY/Cy Young winner)...then you can do what you do best - dumpster dive and make meaningless lateral moves....

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from cassvt2004. Show cassvt2004's posts

    Re: Cody Ross?

    I like Cody Ross as a player and clubhouse guy.  However i can't see how they would extend beyond two years for him unless it was a vesting option based on performance.  I don't have a problem with giving him two years in the 15-18 million range.  He was a bargain last year.  If that third year needs to be guaranteed, then thanks for the season and best of luck.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from parhunter55. Show parhunter55's posts

    Re: Cody Ross?

    I wouldn't be against 3 years, myself.  But it would have to be less per annum, maybe 3 at 30-33 million.  Ross will probably not sign in Boston on a two-year deal.  My guess is he will get more years somewhere else and he will take more years, even at less per.  A guy like that, with a young family is looking for stability.  He wouldn't move his family from Arizona for a two-year deal.  He may even get a 4-year deal from someone, at least as an option year.  That is my guess.  It's not like he is 36 or particularly injury-plagued.  How about 3 years at 30 million, with a 6 million dollar option on a 4th year (with 1.5 million buyout)?

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from raider3524. Show raider3524's posts

    Re: Cody Ross?

    i like ross alot..i wish he stays...but what about ryan ludwick? is he going to be asking for the same? i hear 3/27 for ross?

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from jasko2248. Show jasko2248's posts

    Re: Cody Ross?

    In response to raider3524's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    i like ross alot..i wish he stays...but what about ryan ludwick? is he going to be asking for the same? i hear 3/27 for ross?

    [/QUOTE]

    I think Ludwick would be an ideal replacement if Ross decides to play closer to home.  Ludwick turns 35 next year, so he may be had on a 1 or 2 year deal. 

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from raider3524. Show raider3524's posts

    Re: Cody Ross?

    Red Sox Blog Could Cody Ross have been worth a qualifying offer? Could Cody Ross have been worth a qualifying offer? Comments 1 |  Recommend 0 November 3, 2012 9:06 am By Brian MacPherson

    David Ortiz was the only Red Sox player tendered a qualifying offer by 5 p.m. on Friday, meaning he was the only prospective free agent who would have fetched draft-pick compensation should he have signed elsewhere.

    (He didn't. He signed a two-year deal on Friday night.)

    To receive compensation for a free agent who signs elsewhere, a team has to offer the player a contract for the for the following season worth the average of the top 125 contracts in the game -- $13.3 million, in this case. The team signing any player tendered a qualifying offer must forfeit its first-round draft pick -- unless that team, like the Red Sox, has a top-10 pick -- and the team losing that player receives a supplemental draft pick after the first round.

    Nine free agents -- Ortiz, Michael Bourn, Josh Hamilton, Hiroki Kuroda, Adam LaRoche, Kyle Lohse, Rafael Soriano, Nick Swisher and B.J. Upton -- received qualifying offers. Among the notables who did not receive qualifying offers were Torii Hunter, Edwin Jackson, Anibal Sanchez and Shane Victorino.

    And Cody Ross.

    No one ever really expected Ross would receive a qualifying offer from the Red Sox. The outfielder was a terrific addition to the Red Sox last season, hitting 22 home runs and 34 doubles after signing for just $3 million in the late stages of free agency. Green Monster fit him as perfectly as any ballpark has fit any hitter.

    But Ross generally was a below-average defensive outfielder, especially in left field, and his slugging percentage was more than 200 points lower against righties than against lefties. He looked at times much more like a complementary player -- a No. 6 or No. 7 hitter -- than a foundation player.

    Still, Ross figures to get paid this offseason -- perhaps along the lines of Michael Cuddyer, who signed a three-year, $31.5 million contract with the Colorado Rockies last winter.

    And the Red Sox still need hitters. Thanks to the trade of Carl Crawford and Adrian Gonzalez, the cupboard is pretty bare beyond Ortiz, Jacoby Ellsbury, Dustin Pedroia and Will Middlebrooks.

    The Red Sox also have money to spend -- though they're simultaneously trying to avoid the type of long-term commitments that led to the Gonzalez trade. Many of the free agents on the open market will command just those types of long-term deals. Bourn, Hamilton, LaRoche, Swisher and Upton all figure to command contracts at least three years in length. Some might be twice that.

    For a team with money to spend in free agency but looking to avoid a long-term commitment, the only way to go might be to overpay for a short-term deal. Such a deal wouldn't be extraordinarily efficient, but it would ensure the financial flexibility about which Ben Cherington has talked so much this offseason.

    Would $13.3 million for one season of Ross be an overpay? Undoubtedly. In a perfect world, Ross would sign a contract worth $13.3 million over two seasons -- or maybe $16-17 million, but not much more than that.

    Here's one rough attempt at quantifying his value: The average free agent last season cost $3.92 million per WAR, according to Fangraphs statistics. Ross' performance last season, one he reasonably could be expected to repeat with another year at Fenway Park, was worth 2.4 WAR. That works out to a value of $9.4 million.

    And once a player gets to free agency, there's no telling where bidding could go. Ross might wind up fielding Cuddyer-esque offers of $30 million over three years. For the Red Sox, $13.3 million for one season sounds a lot more palatable than $30 million over three -- and definitely a lot more palatable than $75 million over five years, which might be the price for Bourn or Upton.

    Heck, the Los Angeles Dodgers just signed decent but hardly dominant reliever Brandon League to a three-year, $22.5 million contract -- a player who should be worth less than Ross is worth.

    If the Red Sox believe Ross is worth significantly less than $9-10 million annually, they probably did the right thing by declining to tender him a qualifying offer at $13.3 million. If the Red Sox believe a relatively deep class of free-agent outfielders makes Ross replaceable, that's not something anyone really can judge until it all shakes out.

    But if the Red Sox believe Ross is worth around $10 million, it might have been worth tendering him a qualifying offer -- overpaying in the short term to avoid overextending in the long term. That's what a team with $90 million in payroll flexibility can afford to do.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from southpaw777. Show southpaw777's posts

    Re: Cody Ross?

    In response to raider3524's comment:
    [QUOTE]Red Sox Blog Could Cody Ross have been worth a qualifying offer? Could Cody Ross have been worth a qualifying offer? Comments 1 |  Recommend 0 November 3, 2012 9:06 am By Brian MacPherson

    David Ortiz was the only Red Sox player tendered a qualifying offer by 5 p.m. on Friday, meaning he was the only prospective free agent who would have fetched draft-pick compensation should he have signed elsewhere.

    (He didn't. He signed a two-year deal on Friday night.)

    To receive compensation for a free agent who signs elsewhere, a team has to offer the player a contract for the for the following season worth the average of the top 125 contracts in the game -- $13.3 million, in this case. The team signing any player tendered a qualifying offer must forfeit its first-round draft pick -- unless that team, like the Red Sox, has a top-10 pick -- and the team losing that player receives a supplemental draft pick after the first round.

    Nine free agents -- Ortiz, Michael Bourn, Josh Hamilton, Hiroki Kuroda, Adam LaRoche, Kyle Lohse, Rafael Soriano, Nick Swisher and B.J. Upton -- received qualifying offers. Among the notables who did not receive qualifying offers were Torii Hunter, Edwin Jackson, Anibal Sanchez and Shane Victorino.

    And Cody Ross.

    No one ever really expected Ross would receive a qualifying offer from the Red Sox. The outfielder was a terrific addition to the Red Sox last season, hitting 22 home runs and 34 doubles after signing for just $3 million in the late stages of free agency. Green Monster fit him as perfectly as any ballpark has fit any hitter.

    But Ross generally was a below-average defensive outfielder, especially in left field, and his slugging percentage was more than 200 points lower against righties than against lefties. He looked at times much more like a complementary player -- a No. 6 or No. 7 hitter -- than a foundation player.

    Still, Ross figures to get paid this offseason -- perhaps along the lines of Michael Cuddyer, who signed a three-year, $31.5 million contract with the Colorado Rockies last winter.

    And the Red Sox still need hitters. Thanks to the trade of Carl Crawford and Adrian Gonzalez, the cupboard is pretty bare beyond Ortiz, Jacoby Ellsbury, Dustin Pedroia and Will Middlebrooks.

    The Red Sox also have money to spend -- though they're simultaneously trying to avoid the type of long-term commitments that led to the Gonzalez trade. Many of the free agents on the open market will command just those types of long-term deals. Bourn, Hamilton, LaRoche, Swisher and Upton all figure to command contracts at least three years in length. Some might be twice that.

    For a team with money to spend in free agency but looking to avoid a long-term commitment, the only way to go might be to overpay for a short-term deal. Such a deal wouldn't be extraordinarily efficient, but it would ensure the financial flexibility about which Ben Cherington has talked so much this offseason.

    Would $13.3 million for one season of Ross be an overpay? Undoubtedly. In a perfect world, Ross would sign a contract worth $13.3 million over two seasons -- or maybe $16-17 million, but not much more than that.

    Here's one rough attempt at quantifying his value: The average free agent last season cost $3.92 million per WAR, according to Fangraphs statistics. Ross' performance last season, one he reasonably could be expected to repeat with another year at Fenway Park, was worth 2.4 WAR. That works out to a value of $9.4 million.

    And once a player gets to free agency, there's no telling where bidding could go. Ross might wind up fielding Cuddyer-esque offers of $30 million over three years. For the Red Sox, $13.3 million for one season sounds a lot more palatable than $30 million over three -- and definitely a lot more palatable than $75 million over five years, which might be the price for Bourn or Upton.

    Heck, the Los Angeles Dodgers just signed decent but hardly dominant reliever Brandon League to a three-year, $22.5 million contract -- a player who should be worth less than Ross is worth.

    If the Red Sox believe Ross is worth significantly less than $9-10 million annually, they probably did the right thing by declining to tender him a qualifying offer at $13.3 million. If the Red Sox believe a relatively deep class of free-agent outfielders makes Ross replaceable, that's not something anyone really can judge until it all shakes out.

    But if the Red Sox believe Ross is worth around $10 million, it might have been worth tendering him a qualifying offer -- overpaying in the short term to avoid overextending in the long term. That's what a team with $90 million in payroll flexibility can afford to do.

    [/QUOTE]


    I wouldve offered him one. You kow hes going to get at least 2 years and 14M. More likely 3 and at least 21M. That wouldve netted them a comp pick if he left and 1 year at 13M is an overpay for him, but like I said, Im sure he wouldve declined knowing other teams have interest.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from royf19. Show royf19's posts

    Re: Cody Ross?

    I agree that Ross will likely be in the 2-$14M or 3-$21M area. The reason he isn't signed yet is that he's asking three years at $9M a year ($27M) and that's too much.

    I'd hesitate going three years and I certainly wouldn't go oever $7M a year unless it was for one year -- and maybe not even then.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from southpaw777. Show southpaw777's posts

    Re: Cody Ross?

    In response to royf19's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I agree that Ross will likely be in the 2-$14M or 3-$21M area. The reason he isn't signed yet is that he's asking three years at $9M a year ($27M) and that's too much.

    I'd hesitate going three years and I certainly wouldn't go oever $7M a year unless it was for one year -- and maybe not even then.

    [/QUOTE]


    Thats what I figure roy. Somewhere in the 7-9M range and 3 years. If the Sox offered him 3/21 I think he takes it.

     
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