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    Re: Dan Shaughnessy-For Red Sox, a year of living dreadfully

    Gee, a writer said that it's only just now that it's veering into Joe Kerrigan territory? Wow, talk about coming late to the party.
     
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    Re: Dan Shaughnessy-For Red Sox, a year of living dreadfully

    In response to jpBsSoxFan's comment:

    In response to davetheknave's comment:

    Terry Francona was the best manager the Red Sox ever had.

      Agree, he should never have to buy his own drink when he comes to Boston.

     



    I agree as well... the man is a legend.  Now I want to get Tek ready to be the next legend as a manager of the Sox.  
     
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    Re: Dan Shaughnessy-For Red Sox, a year of living dreadfully

    In response to samclemens' comment:

    Francona is unquestionably the most successful manager in Sox history, but had the benefit of record payrolls and in 2004 a team which in now way compared to any of the teams in the past with only one home grown player in the World Series (Trot Nixon) and a merry band of mercenaries.  Guys like Yaz who had a phenomenal year in 1967, unlike Ortiz and Ramirez, only had his "natural" abilities enroute to earning the Triple Crown.  Certainly different times and much different styles when comparing Williams and Francona.  Not sure that being the best ever when the bar is set extraordinarily low is a noteworthy accomplishment.



    All that matters is the bottom line.  The man was able to keep the team functioning as a team through the world series twice.  Many in this town lament that their loved ones were not around for this period of time.  It is something we waited for through generations.  Whatever the case, Tito managed to keep the team working as a team for many years except the very end of last year.

    Bobby has been much worse with essentially the same team.  It was like September of last year for this entire year.  It is also clear that the leaks are much more common under Bobby V's watch.  To manage in this town isn't just about the on field decisions, the more difficult part are the communications and off field issues.  Bobby is horrible on that front.  

    Tito took a more Bellicheck approach, don't tell the media anything that goes on inside the clubhouse.  Bobby airs his dirty laundry and that isn't good in a  town with vultures as sports writers and talk show hosts.  

    Bill Bellicheck and Tito got it with the media... don't poke the bear.  

     
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    Re: Dan Shaughnessy-For Red Sox, a year of living dreadfully

    In response to RedSoxDOrtiz's comment:

    In response to samclemens' comment:

    Francona is unquestionably the most successful manager in Sox history, but had the benefit of record payrolls and in 2004 a team which in now way compared to any of the teams in the past with only one home grown player in the World Series (Trot Nixon) and a merry band of mercenaries.  Guys like Yaz who had a phenomenal year in 1967, unlike Ortiz and Ramirez, only had his "natural" abilities enroute to earning the Triple Crown.  Certainly different times and much different styles when comparing Williams and Francona.  Not sure that being the best ever when the bar is set extraordinarily low is a noteworthy accomplishment.



    All that matters is the bottom line.  The man was able to keep the team functioning as a team through the world series twice.  Many in this town lament that their loved ones were not around for this period of time.  It is something we waited for through generations.  Whatever the case, Tito managed to keep the team working as a team for many years except the very end of last year.

    Bobby has been much worse with essentially the same team.  It was like September of last year for this entire year.  It is also clear that the leaks are much more common under Bobby V's watch.  To manage in this town isn't just about the on field decisions, the more difficult part are the communications and off field issues.  Bobby is horrible on that front.  

    Tito took a more Bellicheck approach, don't tell the media anything that goes on inside the clubhouse.  Bobby airs his dirty laundry and that isn't good in a  town with vultures as sports writers and talk show hosts.  

    Bill Bellicheck and Tito got it with the media... don't poke the bear.  

     



    I wholeheartedly agree with the notion that Boston has more than its fair share of "vultures" and instigators in all forms of media.  I would, however, be very hesitant to put the names of the Pats' coach and Francona in the same sentence.   Belichek is a "no nonsense" guy when it comes to players who expects to love the game like he does and perform to the best of their ability.   In the NFL, if guys do not perform to his high standards, they disappear.   Francona was an enabler, a coddler and more like an indulgent parent of pampered and spoiled children.  

    More like the immortal Hall of Famer, Peter Gammons, he saw evil, heard evil, but never spoke of it publicly.  He was in the right place at the right time and one might even suggest that were it not for the ringing endorsement of a player named Curtis Montague Schilling, he would have been coaching A ball.   

      

     
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