Eck with a walk off win?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from TheExaminer. Show TheExaminer's posts

    Eck with a walk off win?

    Just heard this on Fox Sports Cincy. The question was asked who coined the term "walk off" for a baseball game. Answer? Eck. Had no idea. 

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from rickerd2. Show rickerd2's posts

    Re: Eck with a walk off win?

    In response to TheExaminer's comment:

    Just heard this on Fox Sports Cincy. The question was asked who coined the term "walk off" for a baseball game. Answer? Eck. Had no idea. 



    What the 'Eck?  Thanks!  Learning is fun, especially when it is teeny details.  Makes life interesting.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from dgalehouse. Show dgalehouse's posts

    Re: Eck with a walk off win?

    In response to TheExaminer's comment:

    Just heard this on Fox Sports Cincy. The question was asked who coined the term "walk off" for a baseball game. Answer? Eck. Had no idea. 



    When did he coin it ?   After Kirk  Gibson's home run ?  

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Eck with a walk off win?

    Yeah, and I think Eck was actually referring to the pitcher walking off the mound with his head down after losing the game.  Now of course it's a 'walk-off win'.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from J-BAY. Show J-BAY's posts

    Re: Eck with a walk off win?

    In response to TheExaminer's comment:

     

    Just heard this on Fox Sports Cincy. The question was asked who coined the term "walk off" for a baseball game. Answer? Eck. Had no idea. 

     



    Yes, Eck has spoken of it, Exam on NESN when he filled in for Remy

     

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from J-BAY. Show J-BAY's posts

    Re: Eck with a walk off win?

    In response to dgalehouse's comment:

    In response to TheExaminer's comment:

     

    Just heard this on Fox Sports Cincy. The question was asked who coined the term "walk off" for a baseball game. Answer? Eck. Had no idea. 

     



    When did he coin it ?   After Kirk  Gibson's home run ?  

     



    We can thank Kirk Gibson

    I believe Eckersley first used the phrase 'walk off' after giving up the home run to Kirk Gibson in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 1 of the 1988 World Series that gave the Dodgers a 5-4 victory over the Athletics.

     
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from dgalehouse. Show dgalehouse's posts

    Re: Eck with a walk off win?

    In response to J-BAY's comment:

    In response to dgalehouse's comment:

     

    In response to TheExaminer's comment:

     

     

     

    Just heard this on Fox Sports Cincy. The question was asked who coined the term "walk off" for a baseball game. Answer? Eck. Had no idea. 

     

     



    When did he coin it ?   After Kirk  Gibson's home run ?  

     

     

     



     

    We can thank Kirk Gibson

    I believe Eckersley first used the phrase 'walk off' after giving up the home run to Kirk Gibson in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 1 of the 1988 World Series that gave the Dodgers a 5-4 victory over the Athletics.

     



    I remember Vin Scully , " She is gone."  

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from J-BAY. Show J-BAY's posts

    Re: Eck with a walk off win?

    When did this term start getting used? [edit]

    When did this term start getting used? I have been a fan of baseball for a long time, but I don't remember hearing the term until a few years ago. Did someone (on ESPN?) coin the phrase? (Unsigned by Cacophony) at 25:39, Apr 19, 2005 (UTC))

    I haven't researched it but my understanding is Dennis Eckersley is given credit for coining the term during his stint as the closer for the Oakland Athletics. While the definition today is generally as described in the article "teams walk off the field" Eckersley's meaning was he threw a pitch and had to "walk off the mound". This is the only story I have ever heard of this origin, if anyone has anymore information I'd like to hear about it so we can update the article. (  Unsigned by :Jobrien at 17:03, Jun 14, 2005 (UTC))
    The article has been updated with some usage history, based on an article in today's Boston Globe article:  Term Covers All the Bases, Boston Globe/boston.com 062405Paul August   16:33, Jun 24, 2005 (UTC)
    I'm 99% sure Rob Neyer from ESPN.com brought it back into common parlance (he didn't invent it, but he brought it back in the late nineties). I definitely remember reading the column on ESPN.com that discussed walk-off homers, and his was about the only one I read regularly before it became part of ESPN Insider (I also read Peter Gammons, but this definitely seems more like Neyer than Gammons). Within weeks of that column, it was being used on Sportscenter and Baseball Tonight and eventually spread.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from TheExaminer. Show TheExaminer's posts

    Re: Eck with a walk off win?

    In response to dgalehouse's comment:

    In response to TheExaminer's comment:

     

    Just heard this on Fox Sports Cincy. The question was asked who coined the term "walk off" for a baseball game. Answer? Eck. Had no idea. 

     



    When did he coin it ?   After Kirk  Gibson's home run ?  

     



    Haha, that was the question Chris Welsh immediately asked Thom Brennaman, to which Brennaman responded, "oh man, now dont do that, dont go there..".

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from TheExaminer. Show TheExaminer's posts

    Re: Eck with a walk off win?

    In response to J-BAY's comment:

    When did this term start getting used? [edit]

    When did this term start getting used? I have been a fan of baseball for a long time, but I don't remember hearing the term until a few years ago. Did someone (on ESPN?) coin the phrase? (Unsigned by Cacophony) at 25:39, Apr 19, 2005 (UTC))

    I haven't researched it but my understanding is Dennis Eckersley is given credit for coining the term during his stint as the closer for the Oakland Athletics. While the definition today is generally as described in the article "teams walk off the field" Eckersley's meaning was he threw a pitch and had to "walk off the mound". This is the only story I have ever heard of this origin, if anyone has anymore information I'd like to hear about it so we can update the article. (  Unsigned by :Jobrien at 17:03, Jun 14, 2005 (UTC))
    The article has been updated with some usage history, based on an article in today's Boston Globe article:  Term Covers All the Bases, Boston Globe/boston.com 062405Paul August   16:33, Jun 24, 2005 (UTC)
    I'm 99% sure Rob Neyer from ESPN.com brought it back into common parlance (he didn't invent it, but he brought it back in the late nineties). I definitely remember reading the column on ESPN.com that discussed walk-off homers, and his was about the only one I read regularly before it became part of ESPN Insider (I also read Peter Gammons, but this definitely seems more like Neyer than Gammons). Within weeks of that column, it was being used on Sportscenter and Baseball Tonight and eventually spread.



    Yes J. That was part of the discussion too. Originally he called it a "walk off piece", as a negative. But, the term spread and changed to a more positive connotation.

     
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