Evidence on difference between a non-drug enhanced League v. a drug-enhanced MLB

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from dannycater. Show dannycater's posts

    Evidence on difference between a non-drug enhanced League v. a drug-enhanced MLB

    All you have to do is pull out the old Home Run Derby black and white tapes. Pull them out, or watch them on some obscure ESPN Oldtimer Des Sporte or whatever channel that has it. Then take a look at Hank Aaron, Mickey Mantle, Eddie Matthews, Harmon Killebrew, and others. Watch them hit the homers as the show is going, live on tape back then. Watch them. How many balls are soaring 150 feet above the CF fence? how many of those balls are Chris Berman back-back-back, 500 foot cannons? I'll tell you how many--none. The guys hit home runs, legit home runs, and a few were bombs, but for the most part they were practice-pitched homers that weren't tape-measure shots. Every ball it seems hit in the All-Star HR Derby going back to McGwire were ridiculously full of moon shots and complete out-of-stratosphere balls that were hitting 4th decks and bouncing off light towers. The game is full of HGH and PEDs are being used by tons and tons of players, including I believe the very sly Chris Davis. The fact is that they are becoming harder and harder to trace due to the technology of the scientists who are finding better ways for the best players to cheat. Same thing with pitchers. You had Nolan Ryan and Bob Feller and Walter Johnson and Sam McDowell and that's pretty much the 100-mph crew. Today, every tom, dick and harry can throw 98 to 103 and don't tell me it's because Tom House has figured out how to generate 15 mph on your fastball with a technique. It's called drugs, and that's how the best players get the fat contracts. Let's either let it slide, call it entertainment, and forget integrity, or baseball law. Or start banning players left and right, watch how fast guys physiques start coming back to normal.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Beantowne. Show Beantowne's posts

    Re: Evidence on difference between a non-drug enhanced League v. a drug-enhanced MLB

    In response to dannycater's comment:

    All you have to do is pull out the old Home Run Derby black and white tapes. Pull them out, or watch them on some obscure ESPN Oldtimer Des Sporte or whatever channel that has it. Then take a look at Hank Aaron, Mickey Mantle, Eddie Matthews, Harmon Killebrew, and others. Watch them hit the homers as the show is going, live on tape back then. Watch them. How many balls are soaring 150 feet above the CF fence? how many of those balls are Chris Berman back-back-back, 500 foot cannons? I'll tell you how many--none. The guys hit home runs, legit home runs, and a few were bombs, but for the most part they were practice-pitched homers that weren't tape-measure shots. Every ball it seems hit in the All-Star HR Derby going back to McGwire were ridiculously full of moon shots and complete out-of-stratosphere balls that were hitting 4th decks and bouncing off light towers. The game is full of HGH and PEDs are being used by tons and tons of players, including I believe the very sly Chris Davis. The fact is that they are becoming harder and harder to trace due to the technology of the scientists who are finding better ways for the best players to cheat. Same thing with pitchers. You had Nolan Ryan and Bob Feller and Walter Johnson and Sam McDowell and that's pretty much the 100-mph crew. Today, every tom, dick and harry can throw 98 to 103 and don't tell me it's because Tom House has figured out how to generate 15 mph on your fastball with a technique. It's called drugs, and that's how the best players get the fat contracts. Let's either let it slide, call it entertainment, and forget integrity, or baseball law. Or start banning players left and right, watch how fast guys physiques start coming back to normal.


    There is some merit to your argument and it's not news that steroids have been used and abused by most big leaguers.

    That said, there has also been a change in the way players ready themselves to compete, back in the 50's and 60's player didn't lift weights nor did they as rule workout to improve their quick twitch muscle. In fact they were all discouraged from lifting, thinking that it would incumber there ability to swing the bat due to being "muscle bound". Most kept themselves in shape in the offseason working in their yards and then used spring training camp to get themselves into game shape. 

    The misnomer is that steroids are the only reason for the increases in Hr and pitchers velocity when in fact it is due to a ton of hard work and modern sports medicine focusing on diet and workouts specific to buiding explosive muscle. Work that is made easier by the healing attributes of steroids. Therein lyes the rub, it is the players that chose to use and abuse that sully the process. Players that are then rewarded for cheating by a system that is broken, and has been for decades.

    Case in point..Manny Ramirez, after testing positive with the Dodgers less the moneys lost for his 50 game suspension netted 17M. Ryan Braun's suspension will cost him 3M, he'll net more than 15M or so...good work if you can get it.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Evidence on difference between a non-drug enhanced League v. a drug-enhanced MLB

    Some of the longest recorded home runs in history were hit by Mantle.  How accurate the measurements were back then is another question.

    Dave Kingman is another guy, presumably clean, who hit the ball enormous distances.

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from maxbialystock. Show maxbialystock's posts

    Re: Evidence on difference between a non-drug enhanced League v. a drug-enhanced MLB


    I completely agree PED's have been and are a problem, but disagree with the exaggerations of the OP, especially the stuff about everyone being able to throw a fastball 98-100 mph.  That is still a rarity, but I do seem to remember Bob Feller being able to do it most of the time and over a long career.  Today a pitcher cannot rely on his fastball however fast it might be.  A closer maybe, but a starter needs to mix in other pitches.  I think it was two years ago when Nava hit a Verlander 100mph fastball--to the opposite field, granted-- for a hard hit double precisely because he was pretty sure a fastball was coming. 

    I do think MLB and the MLBPA are headed in the right direction in eliminating PED's. 

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Marioguy424. Show Marioguy424's posts

    Re: Evidence on difference between a non-drug enhanced League v. a drug-enhanced MLB

     There are steroids, but their use has gone down significantly. Last year, 6 people hit 40 home runs, maxing out at a major league lead of 44 by Miguel Cabrera. In 2011, only two people in all of baseball- Granderson and Bautista, both known (if recently broken out) power hitters. In 2010, still only two people- Bautista and Pujols, another set of power hitters- hit 40 bombs. 2009 had an odd outbreak of power, with 5 people hitting 40- however, they were all in the NL, with NOBODY in the AL reaching 40 homers (Carlos Pena and Mark Teixeira tied with 39). 2008 saw even less power, with only bomb-launchers Howard and Dunn reaching 40. Miguel Cabrera led the AL with a mark of 37- the lowest total to lead a league in over a decade. Only going back to 2007 and 2006 do we even see consectutive years where more than 2 people reach 40 home runs. Also, this may have to do with more effectively hidden PED's, but it is worth mentioning that nobody randomly adds 30 pounds of muscle over the offseason anymore.

     Final point- as Braun and Rodriguez have proved, steroids are still in baseball, but their use is quickly dying.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from JimfromFlorida. Show JimfromFlorida's posts

    Re: Evidence on difference between a non-drug enhanced League v. a drug-enhanced MLB

    Sorry but comparing back then to now does not work.

    Back then many parks were bigger than what they are now. The ball was different. The mound was higher allowing pitchers a greater advantage.


    Then when you watch the old tapes of the HR Derby TV show, just remember the LF and RF lines were 340 and center was 410 with a 15ft high wall. It was taped at Wrigley Field in LA yes LA. That means any HR was carrying a minimum of 360 to 430

    LOVE my  Red Sox, Bs, Cs, Pats and enjoy the ride every year. 

     
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