Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sheriff-Rojas. Show Sheriff-Rojas's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    How about a little love for Tim Waste Wakefield?

     

    Only Softy and hardheaded bcd blowhards would not recognize his contributions, both as a sacrificial lamb in Game 3, and as last man standing to outlast an entire Yankee bullpen in Game 5.  

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThatWasMe. Show ThatWasMe's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to Sheriff-Rojas' comment:
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    In response to Softlaw1's comment:
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    The 13th inning was the classic, as no less than 3 passed balls by Varitek resulted in an extra out for the Yankees and 3 bases advanced by the runners.  It all came down to Wakefield striking out Sierra with the bases loaded on a 3-2 count, his 34th pitch of the inning. 

    Yankees choked, plain and simple. Millar walk and Roberts was the tipping point. Schilling was the leader for the pitching. Ortiz and Manny were the leader of the offense, with the Yankees fearful of Manny and deciding to make Ortiz drive the ball. The Red Sox have not had a pitching staff leader like Schilling and a middle of the lineup pick your poison combo like Manny and Ortiz since two of them aged out and departed. Since then, incompetent Red Sox GM's have been on an embarrassing spending spree of 2nd rate FA bums on 1st rate contracts, few that are fits and almost zero who are not value disasters. 

    [/QUOTE]


    If you thought the Yankees choked then you thought they had the better team.

    I disagree. The big difference between those two teams was the superior Red Sox pen.

    Maybe they were the two best teams in the game that season but the Red Sox were the best team in baseball in 2004.

    [/QUOTE]

    I would agree that the Red Sox pen was deeper that season, and even though Foulke matched and even outpitched the great Mo in that series, it would be blasphemy for a Yankee fan (and any baseball fan for that matter) to suggest that anybody was a better closer.  Also, if you look at the stats, Tom Gordon had a great season (.221 ERA, .881 WHIP).  He just didn't get the job done against the Red Sox and put a lot of stress on Mo and the rest of the pen, leading to their ultimate collapse later in the series.  

    The biggest difference was the rotation.  A tired-armed Kevin Brown, Jon Lieber, an aging Moose,  El Duque, and a useless Javier Vazquez (giggle, giggle) vs. Schill (when stapled shut, ankle that is), Daddy Petey, a resurgent Derek Lowe, and a satisfactory Bronson Arroyo.  Most of it didn't come into play until Game 6, but with Schill vs. Lieber and Lowe vs. Brown (at that point), the Yankees were clearly outmatched.

    [/QUOTE]


    Lieber, Mussina and Vasquez each won a game, I agree Brown was putrid as was Gordan. Arroyo had a 2004 post season era of over 15., Pedro and Schilling lost games in this series too lets not forget.

    Foulke was untouchable.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hingham Hammer. Show Hingham Hammer's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to ThatWasMe's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Softlaw1's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    The 13th inning was the classic, as no less than 3 passed balls by Varitek resulted in an extra out for the Yankees and 3 bases advanced by the runners.  It all came down to Wakefield striking out Sierra with the bases loaded on a 3-2 count, his 34th pitch of the inning. 

    Yankees choked, plain and simple. Millar walk and Roberts was the tipping point. Schilling was the leader for the pitching. Ortiz and Manny were the leader of the offense, with the Yankees fearful of Manny and deciding to make Ortiz drive the ball. The Red Sox have not had a pitching staff leader like Schilling and a middle of the lineup pick your poison combo like Manny and Ortiz since two of them aged out and departed. Since then, incompetent Red Sox GM's have been on an embarrassing spending spree of 2nd rate FA bums on 1st rate contracts, few that are fits and almost zero who are not value disasters. 

    [/QUOTE]


    If you thought the Yankees choked then you thought they had the better team.

    I disagree. The big difference between those two teams was the superior Red Sox pen.

    Maybe they were the two best teams in the game that season but the Red Sox were the best team in baseball in 2004.

    [/QUOTE]

             Since failing to win a series after leading 3 games to none had never been done before or since in baseball calling it a NY Choke makes sense.

             Didn't NY win the East that year.

     
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  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThatWasMe. Show ThatWasMe's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to Ben Cheringtom's comment:
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    The 13th inning was the classic, as no less than 3 passed balls by Varitek resulted in an extra out for the Yankees and 3 bases advanced by the runners.  It all came down to Wakefield striking out Sierra with the bases loaded on a 3-2 count, his 34th pitch of the inning. 

    Yankees choked, plain and simple. Millar walk and Roberts was the tipping point. Schilling was the leader for the pitching. Ortiz and Manny were the leader of the offense, with the Yankees fearful of Manny and deciding to make Ortiz drive the ball. The Red Sox have not had a pitching staff leader like Schilling and a middle of the lineup pick your poison combo like Manny and Ortiz since two of them aged out and departed. Since then, incompetent Red Sox GM's have been on an embarrassing spending spree of 2nd rate FA bums on 1st rate contracts, few that are fits and almost zero who are not value disasters. 

    [/QUOTE]


    If you thought the Yankees choked then you thought they had the better team.

    I disagree. The big difference between those two teams was the superior Red Sox pen.

    Maybe they were the two best teams in the game that season but the Red Sox were the best team in baseball in 2004.

    [/QUOTE]

             Since failing to win a series after leading 3 games to none had never been done before or since in baseball calling it a NY Choke makes sense.

             Didn't NY win the East that year.

    [/QUOTE]


     

     

    Troll/ stalker back at it.

    [/QUOTE]


     

    Yeah. His usual malarky.

    Or I guess he thinks the Yankees with Kevin Brown at the head of the rotation were a better team then the 2004 Red Sox.

    Imo it takes one helluva team to come back from 3-0 deficit in the alcs then go on to win the WS.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
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    The one thing that amazes me is that a walk and a steal are remembered so much more than a shot up the middle that brought him home. I guess it's not that amazing since the walk was the beginning and the steal was so crucial, but if it wasn't for the hit, he wasn't coming home. And in reality, the hit was probably the hardest thing to do in that situation with so much pressure on.

    [/QUOTE]

    Roberts said that he got E-mails from RS fans for years after that.  He was a solid pro and all, but highly forgettable.  Now, because of one SB, people will recognize him 50 years from now.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to kimsaysthis's comment:
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    1 David Ortiz.  Walkoff HR in G4.  [/QUOTE] Joe Buck....we'll see you later tonight..


    [/QUOTE]

    Yes. lol And that's what amazes me. I can remember practically everything Joe Buck said during the last four games. Of course, I've watched them 1,000 times.

    [/QUOTE]lol...i always reference that because i just remember being so beat watching that game, and from the Yanks half of the 10th thru the Sox half of the 11th being two minutes from turning it off and going to bed..


     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from RickEO. Show RickEO's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    The Espn special 4 nights in oct ,they show a Yankee fan standing up, probally 8th inning shakin his head with a look on his face saying PLEASE TELL ME THIS ISNT HAPPENING.   

     
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  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from georom4. Show georom4's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    1 David Ortiz.  Walkoff HR in G4.  Walkoff single in G5.  Including the last game of the ALDS, over a span of 6 postseason games the Red Sox had 3 wins, and they all came on walkoff hits by Ortiz.  He also had a key HR in the 8th inning of G5 and another in the 1st inning of G7.  For the 2004 postseason, Ortiz hit a mind-boggling 400/515/764 with 5 HR and 19 RBI in 14 games.

    2 Joe Torre crucial error in G5.  The Yankees led 4-2 going to the bottom of the 8th inning.  Torre opted to open the inning with Tom Gordon instead of Rivera.  Rivera had thrown 2 innings and 40 pitches in G4 and Torre didnt want to ask him to do it 2 games in a row.  But Gordon gave up a home run, a walk and a single without retiring a batter.  Then Torre brought in Rivera.  Rivera allowed a game-tying sac fly, then closed out the rest of the inning, and the 9th inning as well, with no further damage.  So yes, he ended up throwing the 2 innings anyway.  Thanks always, Joe.

    3 Curt Schilling G6.  The Bloody Sock has come to overshadow Schillings performance.  But even if you leave out the Sock and the strange saga of how Dr. Bill Morgan was able to get him out on the field, it was a masterful clutch performance at the most crucial time.  7 innings of 1-run ball on a cold miserable night in Yankee Stadium, in front of 50,000 Yankee fans there to see the Red Sox comeback and the hopes of their fans crash and burn one more time.

    4 Umpiring crew G6.  I still cant believe this.  First they correctly reversed the original call on Bellhorns HR which was called a double at first.  That was a one run turnaround.  Then, even more incredibly, they correctly reversed the original call on the A-Rod slap play, with 50,000 fans booing and throwing stuff on the field.  That was at least a one run turnaround.  Both reversals were based solely on the umpires assembling and discussing what they had seen-no replays.

    5 Yankee bats silenced after G3.  In G3 the Yankees were a wrecking machine, hitting scorching line drive after towering bomb en route to a merciless 19-run barrage that left the Red Sox staff in shreds.  Then, magically, in G4-7, the Red Sox pitching was suddenly stellar and the Yankee big bats, A-Rod, Sheffield, and Matsui, were virtually shut down.  How can you explain such things?  How can a pitcher like Curtis Leskanic record 4 straight outs in the extra innings of G4 after giving up 3 runs and getting only one out in G3?  Those 4 outs, by the way, were the last pitches of Leskanics career.

    6 Keith Foulke G4-6.  Foulke somehow managed to throw 5 scoreless innings and 100 pitches in 3 nights.  He was truly running on fumes by the time Tony Clark swung and missed the final pitch of G6. One of Franconas greatest moves was using Foulke to get 8 outs in G4 while the Red Sox were still trailing by a run.  Foulke went on to a lights-out World Series.  Unfortunately, it appears he paid the price for his magnificent postseason with the health of his arm.

    7 Derek Lowe G4, G7.  Here is a pitcher coming off a truly awful season, so bad that he was pushed out of the postseason rotation and only the G4 starter because of the dire condition of the staff.  Lowe turns in a clutch performance in G4, then another in G7.  He ends up as the winning pitcher in the deciding games of all 3 postseason series for the Sox.  And then, of course, is cut loose by the team.  It's a strange game.

    8 Tony Clark ground-rule double in 9th inning of G5.  Often pointed to as the moment that made many people think the baseball gods were on the Sox side for once.  If Clarks ball doesnt hop the fence, Sierra scores, and Rivera probably closes things out for a 5-4 Yankee win and the end of the series.

    9 Francona near-critical error in G5.  Cant let you off the hook on this one, Terry.  In the top of the 6th inning the Yankees took a 4-2 lead on Jeters 2-out, bases-loaded double off Pedro.  It was a dagger, another big blow by Captain Clutch.  Following that, Pedro hit A-Rod and walked Sheffield to re-load the bases.  Up steps Matsui, who to this point in the series already has a ridiculous 12 hits and 10 RBI.  This would be the correct time to pull Pedro, who is clearly at the end of his rope, having reached 107 pitches.  Surely Tito remembers the lessons of 2003 ALCS G7 when Pedro was left in too long.  Surely he knows the stats on how Pedro loses effectiveness at 105 pitches and will not let him face the smoking-hot Matsui.  Well, actually, no.  Tito leaves Pedro in, and on a 2-1 pitch Matsui hits a deadly-looking sinking liner to right field.  Miraculously, Trot Nixon, whose misplay on a Jeter fly ball in that same 2003 ALCS G7 contributed to the Yankee rally, runs in and makes a fine catch to keep the score at 4-2.     

    10 Tim Wakefield G5.  Tim Wakefield somehow threw 3 scoreless innings, the 12th, 13th and 14th, and became the winning pitcher.  All this with Varitek catching him instead of his usual catcher Mirabelli.  The 13th inning was the classic, as no less than 3 passed balls by Varitek resulted in an extra out for the Yankees and 3 bases advanced by the runners.  It all came down to Wakefield striking out Sierra with the bases loaded on a 3-2 count, his 34th pitch of the inning.  You can't make this stuff up.

    Yes, I know, I'm leaving out things like the Roberts steal and Damons HRs.  Others would likely have much different lists.  That's how much stuff happened in that one incredible series.   

    [/QUOTE]

    great read..thanks for refreshing some of the lesser known memories of that destined victory...in all fairness to fRAncona - nothing he did on the field wouldve mattered as much as his calm outlook even when down...that set the table for the miracle to unfold

     
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  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ice-Cream. Show Ice-Cream's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to EnchiladaT's comment:
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    I just don't understand why Yankee posters find pleasure in coming to a Red Sox forum! Why don't they stop spending their life here and go to a Yankees board? Are they here to cause trouble? I have to look under my bed every night because I worry mikey might be under there.

    [/QUOTE]


    Pretty soon, we are going to have Blue Jays fans in our Red Sox forum.  All of them have been hybernating since 1993.  LOL

     

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

     

    Imo it takes one helluva team to come back from 3-0 deficit in the alcs then go on to win the WS.



     

     

    Well said. 

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from S5. Show S5's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    The thing I never understood about that series is that with Schilling on the mound, the blood oozing throug his sock and him almost limping to and from the dugout, why wasn't Torre having the Yankees bunt more, making Schilling play the ball?

    My only rationale for it is that Torre valued the integrity of the game more than he did winning. 

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:
    [QUOTE]

    The one thing that amazes me is that a walk and a steal are remembered so much more than a shot up the middle that brought him home. I guess it's not that amazing since the walk was the beginning and the steal was so crucial, but if it wasn't for the hit, he wasn't coming home. And in reality, the hit was probably the hardest thing to do in that situation with so much pressure on.

    [/QUOTE]

    Roberts said that he got E-mails from RS fans for years after that.  He was a solid pro and all, but highly forgettable.  Now, because of one SB, people will recognize him 50 years from now.

    [/QUOTE]


    Roberts was a pinch runner who was born to steal bases. If it wasn't for the timing it wouldn't have been that amazing. It's just what he does. Bill Mueller should be the god that Roberts is and yet he's barely mentioned when the talk turns to 2004, and that series of events.  

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to jete02fan's comment:
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    In response to kimsaysthis's comment:
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    In response to jete02fan's comment:
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    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:
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    1 David Ortiz.  Walkoff HR in G4.  [/QUOTE] Joe Buck....we'll see you later tonight..


    [/QUOTE]

    Yes. lol And that's what amazes me. I can remember practically everything Joe Buck said during the last four games. Of course, I've watched them 1,000 times.

    [/QUOTE]lol...i always reference that because i just remember being so beat watching that game, and from the Yanks half of the 10th thru the Sox half of the 11th being two minutes from turning it off and going to bed..


    [/QUOTE]

    Yes, of course. Your experience was different. My bad. That series must have been awful if you were a Yankee fan. All the things that were said are great memories for me, and the complete opposite for you. But you do have many more happy memories than Sox fans do in other series. So I hope you have great simple memories of those games. I truly mean that. :)

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    As for Yankee fans' faces, I think Billy Crystal and his wife (who looked like she was destroyed) will forever be ingrained in my memory. I'm surprised they didn't start crying. They seemed to really be taking it hard.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hingham Hammer. Show Hingham Hammer's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to ThatWasMe's comment:
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    In response to Ben Cheringtom's comment:
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    In response to Hingham Hammer's comment:
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    In response to ThatWasMe's comment:
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    In response to Softlaw1's comment:
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    The 13th inning was the classic, as no less than 3 passed balls by Varitek resulted in an extra out for the Yankees and 3 bases advanced by the runners.  It all came down to Wakefield striking out Sierra with the bases loaded on a 3-2 count, his 34th pitch of the inning. 

    Yankees choked, plain and simple. Millar walk and Roberts was the tipping point. Schilling was the leader for the pitching. Ortiz and Manny were the leader of the offense, with the Yankees fearful of Manny and deciding to make Ortiz drive the ball. The Red Sox have not had a pitching staff leader like Schilling and a middle of the lineup pick your poison combo like Manny and Ortiz since two of them aged out and departed. Since then, incompetent Red Sox GM's have been on an embarrassing spending spree of 2nd rate FA bums on 1st rate contracts, few that are fits and almost zero who are not value disasters. 

    [/QUOTE]


    If you thought the Yankees choked then you thought they had the better team.

    I disagree. The big difference between those two teams was the superior Red Sox pen.

    Maybe they were the two best teams in the game that season but the Red Sox were the best team in baseball in 2004.

    [/QUOTE]

             Since failing to win a series after leading 3 games to none had never been done before or since in baseball calling it a NY Choke makes sense.

             Didn't NY win the East that year.

    [/QUOTE]


     

     

    Troll/ stalker back at it.

    [/QUOTE]


     

    Yeah. His usual malarky.

    Or I guess he thinks the Yankees with Kevin Brown at the head of the rotation were a better team then the 2004 Red Sox.

    Imo it takes one helluva team to come back from 3-0 deficit in the alcs then go on to win the WS.

    [/QUOTE]

            The best team doesn't always win a series.

            But nobody before or since has coughed up a 3-0 lead in baseball.

            Yanks had the most (101) wins in the AL that season.

            Choke label has been pinned on that yankee team like it or not.

           

            

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThatWasMe. Show ThatWasMe's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to Hingham Hammer's comment:
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    In response to ThatWasMe's comment:
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    The 13th inning was the classic, as no less than 3 passed balls by Varitek resulted in an extra out for the Yankees and 3 bases advanced by the runners.  It all came down to Wakefield striking out Sierra with the bases loaded on a 3-2 count, his 34th pitch of the inning. 

    Yankees choked, plain and simple. Millar walk and Roberts was the tipping point. Schilling was the leader for the pitching. Ortiz and Manny were the leader of the offense, with the Yankees fearful of Manny and deciding to make Ortiz drive the ball. The Red Sox have not had a pitching staff leader like Schilling and a middle of the lineup pick your poison combo like Manny and Ortiz since two of them aged out and departed. Since then, incompetent Red Sox GM's have been on an embarrassing spending spree of 2nd rate FA bums on 1st rate contracts, few that are fits and almost zero who are not value disasters. 

    [/QUOTE]


    If you thought the Yankees choked then you thought they had the better team.

    I disagree. The big difference between those two teams was the superior Red Sox pen.

    Maybe they were the two best teams in the game that season but the Red Sox were the best team in baseball in 2004.

    [/QUOTE]

             Since failing to win a series after leading 3 games to none had never been done before or since in baseball calling it a NY Choke makes sense.

             Didn't NY win the East that year.

    [/QUOTE]


     

     

    Troll/ stalker back at it.

    [/QUOTE]


     

    Yeah. His usual malarky.

    Or I guess he thinks the Yankees with Kevin Brown at the head of the rotation were a better team then the 2004 Red Sox.

    Imo it takes one helluva team to come back from 3-0 deficit in the alcs then go on to win the WS.

    [/QUOTE]

            The best team doesn't always win a series.

            But nobody before or since has coughed up a 3-0 lead in baseball.

            Yanks had the most (101) wins in the AL that season.

            Choke label has been pinned on that yankee team like it or not.

           

            

    [/QUOTE]


    Ok you win the 2004 Yankees were a better team than the Red Sox.

    It is not rare for a MLB team to have the best regular season record and not win the WS.

    It happens all the time.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Helloitsmeagain. Show Helloitsmeagain's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    1-Not strictly the ALCS, but Lowe went 0-3 in 2003, and 3-0 in 2004.  Will any pitcher ever win the clinching game 3x in a row?

    2-Damon goes 3-29 with 1 RBI in 6 games, and has 6 RBIs in 2 ABs.

    [/QUOTE]


    Andy Pettitte became the first pitcher in Major League Baseball history to start and win three series-clinching playoff games in the same year. derek lowe also won three series in 2004, but with one of his wins coming in relief. Additionally, on September 27 against the red sox, Pettitte had been the winning pitcher in the division-clinching game

     
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    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    "Yes, I know, I'm leaving out things like the Roberts steal and Damons HRs.  Others would likely have much different lists.  That's how much stuff happened in that one incredible series."   

    Congrats on a great post!!!!  I enjoyed reading this, and reliving the moments you mention as I did.....  For me as a 50+ year Sox fan I'd add:

     11...... Our team did something that had never been done before:  Win a 7 game series by coming back from a 0-3 game situation ........ And against the Yankees to make it that much better!!!!  

    [/QUOTE]


     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to kimsaysthis's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    [/QUOTE]

    Yes, of course. Your experience was different. My bad. That series must have been awful if you were a Yankee fan. All the things that were said are great memories for me, and the complete opposite for you. But you do have many more happy memories than Sox fans do in other series. So I hope you have great simple memories of those games. I truly mean that. :)

    [/QUOTE] well of course i would prefer the Yanks were on the upside of that but i've been through plenty of bad losses, me wanting to turn the game off had nothing to do with who won, it just a matter of being really tired...(i guess maybe i should have..LOL..) i file that game under "just another one of those things"...i can't speak for other Yankee fans but imo the outcome doesn't deter from how great a game that was(or the series for that matter)...that series doesn't bother me the way some Sox fans seem to think it should because i always go back to what my Dad taught me..sometimes...you just get beat..wasn't meant to be....credit to the Sox for winning the series(and for going on to complete the job in the WS) 


     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hingham Hammer. Show Hingham Hammer's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to ThatWasMe's comment:
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    In response to ThatWasMe's comment:
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    The 13th inning was the classic, as no less than 3 passed balls by Varitek resulted in an extra out for the Yankees and 3 bases advanced by the runners.  It all came down to Wakefield striking out Sierra with the bases loaded on a 3-2 count, his 34th pitch of the inning. 

    Yankees choked, plain and simple. Millar walk and Roberts was the tipping point. Schilling was the leader for the pitching. Ortiz and Manny were the leader of the offense, with the Yankees fearful of Manny and deciding to make Ortiz drive the ball. The Red Sox have not had a pitching staff leader like Schilling and a middle of the lineup pick your poison combo like Manny and Ortiz since two of them aged out and departed. Since then, incompetent Red Sox GM's have been on an embarrassing spending spree of 2nd rate FA bums on 1st rate contracts, few that are fits and almost zero who are not value disasters. 

    [/QUOTE]


    If you thought the Yankees choked then you thought they had the better team.

    I disagree. The big difference between those two teams was the superior Red Sox pen.

    Maybe they were the two best teams in the game that season but the Red Sox were the best team in baseball in 2004.

    [/QUOTE]

             Since failing to win a series after leading 3 games to none had never been done before or since in baseball calling it a NY Choke makes sense.

             Didn't NY win the East that year.

    [/QUOTE]


     

     

    Troll/ stalker back at it.

    [/QUOTE]


     

    Yeah. His usual malarky.

    Or I guess he thinks the Yankees with Kevin Brown at the head of the rotation were a better team then the 2004 Red Sox.

    Imo it takes one helluva team to come back from 3-0 deficit in the alcs then go on to win the WS.

    [/QUOTE]

            The best team doesn't always win a series.

            But nobody before or since has coughed up a 3-0 lead in baseball.

            Yanks had the most (101) wins in the AL that season.

            Choke label has been pinned on that yankee team like it or not.

           

            

    [/QUOTE]


    Ok you win the 2004 Yankees were a better team than the Red Sox.

    It is not rare for a MLB team to have the best regular season record and not win the WS.

    It happens all the time.

    [/QUOTE]

            It's only rare when they cough up a 3-0 lead.

            Not to mention game 6 + 7 were home games.

           BTW I see you got a new friend in Ben C.

           Not surprised.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThatWasMe. Show ThatWasMe's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to Hingham Hammer's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to ThatWasMe's comment:
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    In response to Hingham Hammer's comment:
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    In response to ThatWasMe's comment:
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    In response to Ben Cheringtom's comment:
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    In response to Hingham Hammer's comment:
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    In response to ThatWasMe's comment:
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    In response to Softlaw1's comment:
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    The 13th inning was the classic, as no less than 3 passed balls by Varitek resulted in an extra out for the Yankees and 3 bases advanced by the runners.  It all came down to Wakefield striking out Sierra with the bases loaded on a 3-2 count, his 34th pitch of the inning. 

    Yankees choked, plain and simple. Millar walk and Roberts was the tipping point. Schilling was the leader for the pitching. Ortiz and Manny were the leader of the offense, with the Yankees fearful of Manny and deciding to make Ortiz drive the ball. The Red Sox have not had a pitching staff leader like Schilling and a middle of the lineup pick your poison combo like Manny and Ortiz since two of them aged out and departed. Since then, incompetent Red Sox GM's have been on an embarrassing spending spree of 2nd rate FA bums on 1st rate contracts, few that are fits and almost zero who are not value disasters. 

    [/QUOTE]


    If you thought the Yankees choked then you thought they had the better team.

    I disagree. The big difference between those two teams was the superior Red Sox pen.

    Maybe they were the two best teams in the game that season but the Red Sox were the best team in baseball in 2004.

    [/QUOTE]

             Since failing to win a series after leading 3 games to none had never been done before or since in baseball calling it a NY Choke makes sense.

             Didn't NY win the East that year.

    [/QUOTE]


     

     

    Troll/ stalker back at it.

    [/QUOTE]


     

    Yeah. His usual malarky.

    Or I guess he thinks the Yankees with Kevin Brown at the head of the rotation were a better team then the 2004 Red Sox.

    Imo it takes one helluva team to come back from 3-0 deficit in the alcs then go on to win the WS.

    [/QUOTE]

            The best team doesn't always win a series.

            But nobody before or since has coughed up a 3-0 lead in baseball.

            Yanks had the most (101) wins in the AL that season.

            Choke label has been pinned on that yankee team like it or not.

           

            

    [/QUOTE]


    Ok you win the 2004 Yankees were a better team than the Red Sox.

    It is not rare for a MLB team to have the best regular season record and not win the WS.

    It happens all the time.

    [/QUOTE]

            It's only rare when they cough up a 3-0 lead.

            Not to mention game 6 + 7 were home games.

           BTW I see you got a new friend in Ben C.

           Not surprised.

    [/QUOTE]


    Reflecting that the Sox were able to win games 6 and 7 in YS makes that 2004 Sox team even more impressive.

    Like the Yankees falling behind the defending world champion Braves in 1996 2-0 losing the first two in YS then winning the next three in Atlanta and the series in six.

    Usually the better team prevails, home field is just an after thought.

    Seems Ben C. is as impressed with your maladroit debating skills as I.

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from J-BAY. Show J-BAY's posts

    Re: Flashback: 10 things that still amaze me about the 2004 ALCS

    In response to EdithBRTN's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    The ALCS could have gone the Yankees way on numerous occasions. The Red Sox were fortunate on many plays. One that stands out to me was the GRD that skipped into the stands instead of going down the RF line. One can't say that either team was the better team and why bother to tax your brain trying to do so?The bottom line is that it was great entertainment and a cherished memory - especially to Red Sox fans.

    [/QUOTE]

    Cherished memory yes, great entertainment, not so sure, pike. The first three games were losses, game 3 a heartbreaker which seemed at the time, a back breaker, as well.  Game 4 was, at least we weren't swept. Game 5 was at least we made it respectable.  game 6 and 7, were so nerve racking, I felt sick. 2007 was more entertaining, if not as memorable and historic

     
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