"Happy Memorial Day to all!

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    "Happy Memorial Day to all!

    Hi guys,


    I wanted to send an early shout out to all the fans to take a moment or two while you're all either at a cook out or what ever form of relaxation this coming Monday and say a little prayer to yourselves in honor of those that made the ultimate sacrifice of giving their lives for safety and freedom of this country. It will be my honor and privilege to go to my dad's cemetery and place an American flag at his gravestone along with about 250 other veterans resting there. My dad went to England at the tender age of 20 in 1943 to join the mighty 8th and fly 25 missions as a right waist gunner on a B-24 Liberator. All the time that I was growing up he never mentioned his experiences to me until I came back from my one year tour in Viet-Nam. We all have our hero's and role models that we look up to and mine will always be my dad.


    So happy memorial day Pa from your son who really misses you.


    Peace!


    Hammah

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from 67redsox. Show 67redsox's posts

    Re:

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    Hi guys,

     

    I wanted to send an early shout out to all the fans to take a moment or two while you're all either at a cook out or what ever form of relaxation this coming Monday and say a little prayer to yourselves in honor of those that made the ultimate sacrifice of giving their lives for safety and freedom of this country. It will be my honor and privilege to go to my dad's cemetery and place an American flag at his gravestone along with about 250 other veterans resting there. My dad went to England at the tender age of 20 in 1943 to join the mighty 8th and fly 25 missions as a right waist gunner on a B-24 Liberator. All the time that I was growing up he never mentioned his experiences to me until I came back from my one year tour in Viet-Nam. We all have our hero's and role models that we look up to and mine will always be my dad.

     

    So happy memorial day Pa from your son who really misses you.

     

    Peace!

     

    Hammah



    Great post ham!

    I won't be able to visit my dad's grave today since it's in mass. and I'm in northern virginia but I will say a prayer for him and all who serve our country.

    When I visited his grave a few years back I noticed that he didn't have a flag like other vets so I went to city hall to make sure he received one every year.  I felt in some small way I was able to do something for my dad even though he is no longer with me.  It felt good.














     

     

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re:

    In response to 67redsox's comment:

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    Hi guys,

     

    I wanted to send an early shout out to all the fans to take a moment or two while you're all either at a cook out or what ever form of relaxation this coming Monday and say a little prayer to yourselves in honor of those that made the ultimate sacrifice of giving their lives for safety and freedom of this country. It will be my honor and privilege to go to my dad's cemetery and place an American flag at his gravestone along with about 250 other veterans resting there. My dad went to England at the tender age of 20 in 1943 to join the mighty 8th and fly 25 missions as a right waist gunner on a B-24 Liberator. All the time that I was growing up he never mentioned his experiences to me until I came back from my one year tour in Viet-Nam. We all have our hero's and role models that we look up to and mine will always be my dad.

     

    So happy memorial day Pa from your son who really misses you.

     

    Peace!

     

    Hammah



    Great post ham!

    I won't be able to visit my dad's grave today since it's in mass. and I'm in northern virginia but I will say a prayer for him and all who serve our country.

    When I visited his grave a few years back I noticed that he didn't have a flag like other vets so I went to city hall to make sure he received one every year.  I felt in some small way I was able to do something for my dad even though he is no longer with me.  It felt good.














     

     


    a big ol cyber hug from me to you 67! thanks for the kind words.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from 67redsox. Show 67redsox's posts

    Re:

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    In response to 67redsox's comment:

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    Hi guys,

     

    I wanted to send an early shout out to all the fans to take a moment or two while you're all either at a cook out or what ever form of relaxation this coming Monday and say a little prayer to yourselves in honor of those that made the ultimate sacrifice of giving their lives for safety and freedom of this country. It will be my honor and privilege to go to my dad's cemetery and place an American flag at his gravestone along with about 250 other veterans resting there. My dad went to England at the tender age of 20 in 1943 to join the mighty 8th and fly 25 missions as a right waist gunner on a B-24 Liberator. All the time that I was growing up he never mentioned his experiences to me until I came back from my one year tour in Viet-Nam. We all have our hero's and role models that we look up to and mine will always be my dad.

     

    So happy memorial day Pa from your son who really misses you.

     

    Peace!

     

    Hammah



    Great post ham!

    I won't be able to visit my dad's grave today since it's in mass. and I'm in northern virginia but I will say a prayer for him and all who serve our country.

    When I visited his grave a few years back I noticed that he didn't have a flag like other vets so I went to city hall to make sure he received one every year.  I felt in some small way I was able to do something for my dad even though he is no longer with me.  It felt good.














     

     


    a big ol cyber hug from me to you 67! thanks for the kind words.


    Right back at ya ham!!!














     

     

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bill-806. Show Bill-806's posts

    Re:

    In response to 67redsox's comment:

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    In response to 67redsox's comment:

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    Hi guys,

     

    I wanted to send an early shout out to all the fans to take a moment or two while you're all either at a cook out or what ever form of relaxation this coming Monday and say a little prayer to yourselves in honor of those that made the ultimate sacrifice of giving their lives for safety and freedom of this country. It will be my honor and privilege to go to my dad's cemetery and place an American flag at his gravestone along with about 250 other veterans resting there. My dad went to England at the tender age of 20 in 1943 to join the mighty 8th and fly 25 missions as a right waist gunner on a B-24 Liberator. All the time that I was growing up he never mentioned his experiences to me until I came back from my one year tour in Viet-Nam. We all have our hero's and role models that we look up to and mine will always be my dad.

     

    So happy memorial day Pa from your son who really misses you.

     

    Peace!

     

    Hammah



    Great post ham!

    I won't be able to visit my dad's grave today since it's in mass. and I'm in northern virginia but I will say a prayer for him and all who serve our country.

    When I visited his grave a few years back I noticed that he didn't have a flag like other vets so I went to city hall to make sure he received one every year.  I felt in some small way I was able to do something for my dad even though he is no longer with me.  It felt good.














     

     


    a big ol cyber hug from me to you 67! thanks for the kind words.


    Right back at ya ham!!!














     

     

    DAD & BILL-806 SEND THE SAME TO ALL ........  HOWEVAA,  WE HAVE BEEN REMOVED, AGAIN..... HOPE TO BE BACK SOOOOON !!


     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re:

    You too Hammah..and to all the veterans in the Sox forum. Thank you for your service and your bravery. Without you, we would not enjoy the freedoms and peace of mind we take for granted.

    "It is not down in any map...trueplaces never are...." ( Melville)

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from SFBostonFan. Show SFBostonFan's posts

    Re:

    My father was born in Italy and fortunately was able to come through Ellis Island and only with $5.00 in his  pocket & lived a good life here and was an avid Red Sox fan who, unfortunately, went to his reward never having seen them win a World Series. When he was drafted, he said they could put him in jail as he didn’t want to fight in Italy and was about to join the Marines to fight in the Pacific but the draft board allowed him to work at the shipyard at South Portland, Maine and he was a pipe fitter on the SS Jeremiah O’Brien, one of the two remaining fully functional Liberty ships launched during WW2. It has the distinction of being the last unaltered Liberty ship and remains historically accurate. This is what was incredible as when my father visited me here in SF, he exclaimed “Figlio Mio”, my son, that’s the ship I helped build. It’s moored at pier 45 on Fisherman’s Wharf and is open to the public with guided tours. My Dad was our guide ! He is buried in Calvary cemetery in Portland---I am in SF so can't visit him but I consider him a Veteran as liberty ships providing ammo, vehicles, food, troops etc.were critical in winning the war and many were sitting ducks for the German UBoats.


     


     


     


    You need not read the rest as I mention Italy in the war and much of it does not apply to our Memorial Day. My Dad had 3 brothers who couldn’t make it here and they were drafted too in Italy. Two of them died fighting with the partisans after Italy surrendered. Rewarding to me was to see pervasive throughout our travels in Italy to see numerous monuments to the Italian partisans who prior to Italy's surrender and especially afterwards, former solders, joined with the Allies to fight the Nazis. One site had a wall with about 100 photos of the partisan victims shot by the Germans, an image I'll soon not forget. After Italy surrended, the Germans shot many of the former Italian soldiers (their allies) for fear, and rightfully so, they'd turn against them. The war was not a war supported by the people. In fact, when Italy surrended, and the Allies came over from Sicily on their way up the boot, the Italians cheered as if they had been an occupied country like France, Holland, Belgium, Hungary etc.


     


     


     


    In my travels in Sicily I wanted to see where Patton landed and it was right south of Agrigento, Valley of the Temples, at Porto Empedocle where you may have seen this with George Scott as Patton. Also, in Palermo, we visited the Royal Palace and its chapel, claimed to be the most magnificent example of medieval art in this city. Its grandeur impressed General Patton so much that in 1943 he installed his headquarters in this Palace. I want to add that the Mafia was extremely helpful telling the Allies the locations of German Divisions—the war was not good for business (Ha!).


     


     


     


    I wanted to see Anzio beach, about 50 miles south of Rome and the scene of one of the most courageous and bloody battles of the 2nd World War. In a year otherwise filled with defeat, Hitler was determined to gain the prestige of holding the Allies south of Rome. The Germans threw attack after attack against the beachhead in an effort to drive the landing force into the sea. Despite numerically superior enemy forces, our troops held their beachhead, fought off every enemy attack, and then built up a powerful striking force which spearheaded our army's triumphant entry into Rome in June 1944. I found the drive down the coastal route through many seaside towns similar to beach towns in California and New England, condos and apartments yet my mind wondered what it must have been like 70 years ago.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from billge. Show billge's posts

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    And to you and yours Hammah!

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re:

    In response to miscricket's comment:

    You too Hammah..and to all the veterans in the Sox forum. Thank you for your service and your bravery. Without you, we would not enjoy the freedoms and peace of mind we take for granted.

    "It is not down in any map...trueplaces never are...." ( Melville)


    thanks miscricket! I/we who ever wore the uniform thank you very much.

    (I wonder why the post above yours was removed? It boogles my mind that somebody would make an inappropriate post to this thread.)

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac35. Show pinstripezac35's posts

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    nice read Hammah..

    happy holiday 2 all

     

     

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

    Re:

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    In response to miscricket's comment:

    You too Hammah..and to all the veterans in the Sox forum. Thank you for your service and your bravery. Without you, we would not enjoy the freedoms and peace of mind we take for granted.

    "It is not down in any map...trueplaces never are...." ( Melville)


    thanks miscricket! I/we who ever wore the uniform thank you very much.

    (I wonder why the post above yours was removed? It boogles my mind that somebody would make an inappropriate post to this thread.)




    You're welcome...and I was wondering the same thing....but then again..lots of things on BDC boggle the mind...that's what makes it such an adventure ;-)

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac35. Show pinstripezac35's posts

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    This post has been removed.

    most times appears automatically when a banned poster tries 2 post

     

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from miscricket. Show miscricket's posts

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    In response to pinstripezac35's comment:

    This post has been removed.

    most times appears automatically when a banned poster tries 2 post

     




    Oh...okay..that makes sense...so maybe Bill weighed in. Thanks for clarifying.

     
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    Re:

     



    Oh...okay..that makes sense...so maybe Bill weighed in. Thanks for clarifying.

    sure

    yeah that's who I was thinking 2

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re:

    In response to miscricket's comment:

    In response to pinstripezac35's comment:

    This post has been removed.

    most times appears automatically when a banned poster tries 2 post

     




    Oh...okay..that makes sense...so maybe Bill weighed in. Thanks for clarifying.


    I was not aware that Bill-806 got banned. why would he be?

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re:

    In response to SFBostonFan's comment:

    My father was born in Italy and fortunately was able to come through Ellis Island and only with $5.00 in his  pocket & lived a good life here and was an avid Red Sox fan who, unfortunately, went to his reward never having seen them win a World Series. When he was drafted, he said they could put him in jail as he didn’t want to fight in Italy and was about to join the Marines to fight in the Pacific but the draft board allowed him to work at the shipyard at South Portland, Maine and he was a pipe fitter on the SS Jeremiah O’Brien, one of the two remaining fully functional Liberty ships launched during WW2. It has the distinction of being the last unaltered Liberty ship and remains historically accurate. This is what was incredible as when my father visited me here in SF, he exclaimed “Figlio Mio”, my son, that’s the ship I helped build. It’s moored at pier 45 on Fisherman’s Wharf and is open to the public with guided tours. My Dad was our guide ! He is buried in Calvary cemetery in Portland---I am in SF so can't visit him but I consider him a Veteran as liberty ships providing ammo, vehicles, food, troops etc.were critical in winning the war and many were sitting ducks for the German UBoats.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    You need not read the rest as I mention Italy in the war and much of it does not apply to our Memorial Day. My Dad had 3 brothers who couldn’t make it here and they were drafted too in Italy. Two of them died fighting with the partisans after Italy surrendered. Rewarding to me was to see pervasive throughout our travels in Italy to see numerous monuments to the Italian partisans who prior to Italy's surrender and especially afterwards, former solders, joined with the Allies to fight the Nazis. One site had a wall with about 100 photos of the partisan victims shot by the Germans, an image I'll soon not forget. After Italy surrended, the Germans shot many of the former Italian soldiers (their allies) for fear, and rightfully so, they'd turn against them. The war was not a war supported by the people. In fact, when Italy surrended, and the Allies came over from Sicily on their way up the boot, the Italians cheered as if they had been an occupied country like France, Holland, Belgium, Hungary etc.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    In my travels in Sicily I wanted to see where Patton landed and it was right south of Agrigento, Valley of the Temples, at Porto Empedocle where you may have seen this with George Scott as Patton. Also, in Palermo, we visited the Royal Palace and its chapel, claimed to be the most magnificent example of medieval art in this city. Its grandeur impressed General Patton so much that in 1943 he installed his headquarters in this Palace. I want to add that the Mafia was extremely helpful telling the Allies the locations of German Divisions—the war was not good for business (Ha!).

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    I wanted to see Anzio beach, about 50 miles south of Rome and the scene of one of the most courageous and bloody battles of the 2nd World War. In a year otherwise filled with defeat, Hitler was determined to gain the prestige of holding the Allies south of Rome. The Germans threw attack after attack against the beachhead in an effort to drive the landing force into the sea. Despite numerically superior enemy forces, our troops held their beachhead, fought off every enemy attack, and then built up a powerful striking force which spearheaded our army's triumphant entry into Rome in June 1944. I found the drive down the coastal route through many seaside towns similar to beach towns in California and New England, condos and apartments yet my mind wondered what it must have been like 70 years ago.




    semper fi bulldog. and may God bless the eagle,globe and anchor.

    Hammah out!

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from dustcover. Show dustcover's posts

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    Each Memorial Day I say a prayer for my now-deceased uncle who landed at Normandy at T minus 13. Thirteen minutes after the first boot hit the sand, he was amidst the chaos. What hell it must have been.

    But Memorial Day also reminds me of a previous battle in a previous war that Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae describes as a ‘nightmare’ in a letter to his mother.

    McCrae fought in the second battle of Ypres in the Flanders region of Belgium where the German army launched one of the first chemical attacks in the history of war. They attacked the Canadian position with chlorine gas on April 22, 1915, but were unable to break through the Canadian line, which held for over two weeks.

    In a letter written to his mother, McCrae described the battle, "For seventeen days and seventeen nights none of us have had our clothes off, nor our boots even, except occasionally. In all that time while I was awake, gunfire and rifle fire never ceased for sixty seconds.... And behind it all was the constant background of the sights of the dead, the wounded, the maimed, and a terrible anxiety lest the line should give way."

    Alexis Helmer, a close friend, was killed during the battle on May 2. McCrae performed the burial service himself, at which time he noted how poppies quickly grew around the graves of those who died at Ypres. The next day, he composed this poem while sitting in the back of an ambulance.

    So although it relates to an earlier era, I’d like to share it in remembrance of those fallen in battle.

    In Flanders fields the poppies blow
    Between the crosses, row on row,
    That mark our place; and in the sky
    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
    Scarce heard amid the guns below.

    We are the Dead. Short days ago
    We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
    Loved and were loved, and now we lie
    In Flanders fields.

    Take up our quarrel with the foe:
    To you from failing hands we throw
    The torch; be yours to hold it high.
    If ye break faith with us who die
    We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
    In Flanders fields.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re:

    In response to dustcover's comment:

    Each Memorial Day I say a prayer for my now-deceased uncle who landed at Normandy at T minus 13. Thirteen minutes after the first boot hit the sand, he was amidst the chaos. What hell it must have been.

    But Memorial Day also reminds me of a previous battle in a previous war that Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae describes as a ‘nightmare’ in a letter to his mother.

    McCrae fought in the second battle of Ypres in the Flanders region of Belgium where the German army launched one of the first chemical attacks in the history of war. They attacked the Canadian position with chlorine gas on April 22, 1915, but were unable to break through the Canadian line, which held for over two weeks.

    In a letter written to his mother, McCrae described the battle, "For seventeen days and seventeen nights none of us have had our clothes off, nor our boots even, except occasionally. In all that time while I was awake, gunfire and rifle fire never ceased for sixty seconds.... And behind it all was the constant background of the sights of the dead, the wounded, the maimed, and a terrible anxiety lest the line should give way."

    Alexis Helmer, a close friend, was killed during the battle on May 2. McCrae performed the burial service himself, at which time he noted how poppies quickly grew around the graves of those who died at Ypres. The next day, he composed this poem while sitting in the back of an ambulance.

    So although it relates to an earlier era, I’d like to share it in remembrance of those fallen in battle.

    In Flanders fields the poppies blow
    Between the crosses, row on row,
    That mark our place; and in the sky
    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
    Scarce heard amid the guns below.

    We are the Dead. Short days ago
    We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
    Loved and were loved, and now we lie
    In Flanders fields.

    Take up our quarrel with the foe:
    To you from failing hands we throw
    The torch; be yours to hold it high.
    If ye break faith with us who die
    We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
    In Flanders fields.



    thanks dusty. a really great post my friend. enjoy the long weekend.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from SFBostonFan. Show SFBostonFan's posts

    Re:

    In response to dustcover's comment:

    Each Memorial Day I say a prayer for my now-deceased uncle who landed at Normandy at T minus 13. Thirteen minutes after the first boot hit the sand, he was amidst the chaos. What hell it must have been.

    But Memorial Day also reminds me of a previous battle in a previous war that Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae describes as a ‘nightmare’ in a letter to his mother.

    McCrae fought in the second battle of Ypres in the Flanders region of Belgium where the German army launched one of the first chemical attacks in the history of war. They attacked the Canadian position with chlorine gas on April 22, 1915, but were unable to break through the Canadian line, which held for over two weeks.

    In a letter written to his mother, McCrae described the battle, "For seventeen days and seventeen nights none of us have had our clothes off, nor our boots even, except occasionally. In all that time while I was awake, gunfire and rifle fire never ceased for sixty seconds.... And behind it all was the constant background of the sights of the dead, the wounded, the maimed, and a terrible anxiety lest the line should give way."

    Alexis Helmer, a close friend, was killed during the battle on May 2. McCrae performed the burial service himself, at which time he noted how poppies quickly grew around the graves of those who died at Ypres. The next day, he composed this poem while sitting in the back of an ambulance.

    So although it relates to an earlier era, I’d like to share it in remembrance of those fallen in battle.

    In Flanders fields the poppies blow
    Between the crosses, row on row,
    That mark our place; and in the sky
    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
    Scarce heard amid the guns below.

    We are the Dead. Short days ago
    We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
    Loved and were loved, and now we lie
    In Flanders fields.

    Take up our quarrel with the foe:
    To you from failing hands we throw
    The torch; be yours to hold it high.
    If ye break faith with us who die
    We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
    In Flanders fields.



    By the way Hammah, you "ol' doggie", I've been out of New England for almost 50 years except for annual visits to family so I still remember my Bostonese like this game is now "OVAH" Obviously, I need not know but I would guess your name is really "Hammer"...HA!


    Wow...I really appreciated reading the above Re: Flanders...gave me goosebumps. I do not intend to minimize Normandy and the bravery there and, of course, I'm partial to the Marines as I cite the following:

    There are many estimates of casualties of 5000 dead and 10000-15000 wounded Allied troops at Normandy. I would like to mention that at Okinawa there were 14000 dead and 65000 casualties and Iwo Jima 6800 dead and 26000 casualties, of course these campaigns were one to 2 months long, most were Marines but many Army too.

    I visited Normandy and I saw at the Museum “6 June 1944 D Day” uniforms, weapons, films etc.  In a film, one of Normandy’s beaches is called “Arromanches” where an artificial port was created so that 1000s of Allied Forces with heavy equipment could come ashore. Visible today still are the remains of the floating harbor. If anyone goes, you’ll see Nazi bunkers all over but most impressive is “Point du Hoc” where 3 companies of the 2nd Ranger Battalion climbed 100 feet up a vertical cliff with barbed wire at the top & grenades being tossed down on them. I, couldn’t make this climb with nobody above trying to kill me.

    I have seen many Military sites in the world, our own Gettysburg, Bastogne, Anzio, Waterloo etc. but none has left me with more of an awe inspiring sensation than to see on about 175 acres the American cemetery on a plateau facing Omaha Beach with as far as the eye can see white crosses & Stars of David. It was chilling !!!

    It was interesting as we walked around that there was a German tour & I recall the French guide saying that many local innocent French citizens were killed that day in the bombing and it was like she was very angry about it. I mean we had the Nazis believing our main attack was to be at Calais but we had to tell the locals to get out of their houses. Yup, of course, there would have been no sympathizers alerting the Germans to this. To me, this was an acceptable casualty of war.

     

     

     

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from georom4. Show georom4's posts

    Re:

    I had my students read the history of the day over the intercom as well as poems like Flanders Field...we finished up with the Gettysburg Address and then Taps...the kids seemed to get it...

    As always - 100% correct!

     
     
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