how long until

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from mef429. Show mef429's posts

    how long until

    japan or another one of these hi-tech robotics trendsetting nations creates a robot that can not be struck out? they already have robots that can pitch and hit with one another. but i'm talking about a robot that a human pitcher throws to and makes solid contact 100% of the time. how far out until pitchers are taking the "babe ruth-bot" challenge?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TuTYFJ8PQ1c

     
  2. This post has been removed.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: how long until

    Domo arigato , Mr. Roboto mata o hima de

    Domo arigato , Mr. Roboto himitsu wo shiri tai.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from mef429. Show mef429's posts

    Re: how long until

    you miss the point. this isn't meant as an alternative to using real batters, its just for fun. How many years until a robot is developed that will always make solid contact with a pitch thrown by a human analog.. the hardest fastball, the nastiest slider, the breakingest breaking ball. all crushed by a robot designed to specifically do so. this has nothing to do with the game of baseball.

     
  5. This post has been removed.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from mef429. Show mef429's posts

    Re: how long until

    hey pike you still never answered me as to why you got banned..

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: how long until

    What we really need are robo-umps.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from J-BAY. Show J-BAY's posts

    Re: how long until

    In response to mef429's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    hey pike you still never answered me as to why you got banned..

    [/QUOTE]


    which one mef, pollyanna or yogi?

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from mef429. Show mef429's posts

    Re: how long until

    pollyanna definitely. maybe both? probably both.

     

    and yes, roboumps would make the game better. or at least expanded replay.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from J-BAY. Show J-BAY's posts

    Re: how long until

    In response to mef429's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    pollyanna definitely. maybe both? probably both.

     

    and yes, roboumps would make the game better. or at least expanded replay.

    [/QUOTE]


    yup and yup

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Soxdog67. Show Soxdog67's posts

    Re: how long until

    In response to mef429's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    you miss the point. this isn't meant as an alternative to using real batters, its just for fun. How many years until a robot is developed that will always make solid contact with a pitch thrown by a human analog.. the hardest fastball, the nastiest slider, the breakingest breaking ball. all crushed by a robot designed to specifically do so. this has nothing to do with the game of baseball.

    [/QUOTE]


    mef, have you ever played the game?

    The day someone can invent a robot with reaction times faster than the eye/brain/hand coordination of humans and to be able to judge speed and movement of the baseball will be a extremely masterful accomplishment...by that time they'll have a robotic pitcher around to strike out the robotic batter.

    Here is an article I found regarding the Science of Baseball pitch:

    A major league pitcher can throw a baseball up to 95 miles per hour -- some can move it even faster. At this speed it takes about four-tenths of a second for the ball to travel the 60 feet, 6 inches from the pitcher's mound to home plate, where the batter, with muscles as tense as coiled springs, like a predatory animal about to pounce, waits for the precise moment to swing at the ball. Baseball is a game played at the edge of biological time, just within the limits of a human's ability to react.

     

           

     

    By the time the ball has traveled a dozen feet from the pitcher's mound, the batter has a good visual fix on it. In a thought process much too quick for deliberation, he has decided whether or not the pitch is a fastball, curveball, slider, knuckleball, screwball, or whatever -- yet a good deal of data has gone into this instantaneous and non-verbal decision.

     

     

    During the entire middle portion of the pitch, the batter must time the ball and decide where to swing. If the batter decides to swing, he must start when the ball is approximately 25 to 30 feet in front of the plate. The ball will arrive at the plate about 250 thousandths of a second later -- about the limit of human reaction time. The bat must make contact with the ball within an even smaller time range: A few thousandths of a second error in timing will result in a foul ball. Position is important, too. Hitting the ball only a few millimeters too high or too low results in a fly ball or a grounder.

     

    Exactly how humans are able to estimate the expected position of a quickly moving ball is unknown. Obviously, this remarkable skill is learned through long practice. Eye-brain-body coordination is acquired only by going through the motions over and over; even so, the batter misses most of the time. Getting a hit three times out of ten at bat is considered an excellent average. It's interesting that George Schaller and other ethologists have observed that lions and cheetahs are also successful only about a third of the time in capturing their prey.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from mef429. Show mef429's posts

    Re: how long until

    In response to Soxdog67's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to mef429's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    you miss the point. this isn't meant as an alternative to using real batters, its just for fun. How many years until a robot is developed that will always make solid contact with a pitch thrown by a human analog.. the hardest fastball, the nastiest slider, the breakingest breaking ball. all crushed by a robot designed to specifically do so. this has nothing to do with the game of baseball.

    [/QUOTE]


    mef, have you ever played the game?

    The day someone can invent a robot with reaction times faster than the eye/brain/hand coordination of humans and to be able to judge speed and movement of the baseball will be a extremely masterful accomplishment...by that time they'll have a robotic pitcher around to strike out the robotic batter.

    Here is an article I found regarding the Science of Baseball pitch:

    A major league pitcher can throw a baseball up to 95 miles per hour -- some can move it even faster. At this speed it takes about four-tenths of a second for the ball to travel the 60 feet, 6 inches from the pitcher's mound to home plate, where the batter, with muscles as tense as coiled springs, like a predatory animal about to pounce, waits for the precise moment to swing at the ball. Baseball is a game played at the edge of biological time, just within the limits of a human's ability to react.

     

           

     

    By the time the ball has traveled a dozen feet from the pitcher's mound, the batter has a good visual fix on it. In a thought process much too quick for deliberation, he has decided whether or not the pitch is a fastball, curveball, slider, knuckleball, screwball, or whatever -- yet a good deal of data has gone into this instantaneous and non-verbal decision.

     

     

    During the entire middle portion of the pitch, the batter must time the ball and decide where to swing. If the batter decides to swing, he must start when the ball is approximately 25 to 30 feet in front of the plate. The ball will arrive at the plate about 250 thousandths of a second later -- about the limit of human reaction time. The bat must make contact with the ball within an even smaller time range: A few thousandths of a second error in timing will result in a foul ball. Position is important, too. Hitting the ball only a few millimeters too high or too low results in a fly ball or a grounder.

     

    Exactly how humans are able to estimate the expected position of a quickly moving ball is unknown. Obviously, this remarkable skill is learned through long practice. Eye-brain-body coordination is acquired only by going through the motions over and over; even so, the batter misses most of the time. Getting a hit three times out of ten at bat is considered an excellent average. It's interesting that George Schaller and other ethologists have observed that lions and cheetahs are also successful only about a third of the time in capturing their prey.

    [/QUOTE]


    i have played baseball for many years as well as other sports. but the difference between man and machine is that a computer can do so many more things so much faster than the combination of your brain/muscles. Which is why so many things have been dominated by machines. 10-20 years ago it was proposterous to think a computer could beat a human at chess and yet there are chess programs that are unbeatable. 2 computers can play 50 games of Chess in the amount of time it takes a 1 person to make a single move. A robot could track the velocity and spin of the ball within a split second and create an accurate trajectory and flight path of the ball to pinpoint where it will be when it crosses the plate. a machine has the ultimate hand/eye coordination so it would never miss a pitch once it knows where it will be by the time it crosses the plate.

    do you know how computers work?  theres a reason the saying "To err is human" exists

     
  13. This post has been removed.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from mef429. Show mef429's posts

    Re: how long until

    In response to Yash-Shmenge's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Are we talking about a robot that is built in the shape of a human being here with two legs, two arms, a head with stereoscopic lenses for depth perception, arms that swivel out of sockets and go up and down, a torso that flexes to maximize bat momentum. I'd say that it is possible but the cost to build such a robot would be huge and the invention would be impractical. A robot that plays table tennis would be much easier to perfect.

    [/QUOTE]


    yes that is very impractical, but no. i was talking about something more along the lines of what is in the video.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from J-BAY. Show J-BAY's posts

    Re: how long until

    In response to mef429's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Yash-Shmenge's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Are we talking about a robot that is built in the shape of a human being here with two legs, two arms, a head with stereoscopic lenses for depth perception, arms that swivel out of sockets and go up and down, a torso that flexes to maximize bat momentum. I'd say that it is possible but the cost to build such a robot would be huge and the invention would be impractical. A robot that plays table tennis would be much easier to perfect.

    [/QUOTE]


    yes that is very impractical, but no. i was talking about something more along the lines of what is in the video.

    [/QUOTE]

    another Pike oldie but not goodie, mef.

     
  16. This post has been removed.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from mef429. Show mef429's posts

    Re: how long until

    In response to mryazz's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to mef429's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    you miss the point. this isn't meant as an alternative to using real batters, its just for fun. How many years until a robot is developed that will always make solid contact with a pitch thrown by a human analog.. the hardest fastball, the nastiest slider, the breakingest breaking ball. all crushed by a robot designed to specifically do so. this has nothing to do with the game of baseball.

    [/QUOTE]

    the SOX already had a robot, but they got rid of it. he could hit, but this robot's weakness was he couldn't run. also, he had a robot's personality.

    [/QUOTE]

    ill bite. who?

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from J-BAY. Show J-BAY's posts

    Re: how long until

    In response to mef429's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to mryazz's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to mef429's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    you miss the point. this isn't meant as an alternative to using real batters, its just for fun. How many years until a robot is developed that will always make solid contact with a pitch thrown by a human analog.. the hardest fastball, the nastiest slider, the breakingest breaking ball. all crushed by a robot designed to specifically do so. this has nothing to do with the game of baseball.

    [/QUOTE]

    the SOX already had a robot, but they got rid of it. he could hit, but this robot's weakness was he couldn't run. also, he had a robot's personality.

    [/QUOTE]

    ill bite. who?

    [/QUOTE]

    Think he's referring to Gonzo

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from dgalehouse. Show dgalehouse's posts

    Re: how long until

    In response to Yash-Shmenge's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Are we talking about a robot that is built in the shape of a human being here with two legs, two arms, a head with stereoscopic lenses for depth perception, arms that swivel out of sockets and go up and down, a torso that flexes to maximize bat momentum. I'd say that it is possible but the cost to build such a robot would be huge and the invention would be impractical. A robot that plays table tennis would be much easier to perfect.

    [/QUOTE]


    Can I ask you question ?  What goes good with cabbage rolls ?

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from mef429. Show mef429's posts

    Re: how long until

    In response to J-BAY's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to mef429's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to mryazz's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to mef429's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    you miss the point. this isn't meant as an alternative to using real batters, its just for fun. How many years until a robot is developed that will always make solid contact with a pitch thrown by a human analog.. the hardest fastball, the nastiest slider, the breakingest breaking ball. all crushed by a robot designed to specifically do so. this has nothing to do with the game of baseball.

    [/QUOTE]

    the SOX already had a robot, but they got rid of it. he could hit, but this robot's weakness was he couldn't run. also, he had a robot's personality.

    [/QUOTE]

    ill bite. who?

    [/QUOTE]

    Think he's referring to Gonzo

    [/QUOTE]


    thats who i thought, i always figured a-gon was a machine

     
  21. This post has been removed.

     
  22. This post has been removed.

     
  23. This post has been removed.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from dgalehouse. Show dgalehouse's posts

    Re: how long until

    In response to Yash-Shmenge's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to dgalehouse's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Yash-Shmenge's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Are we talking about a robot that is built in the shape of a human being here with two legs, two arms, a head with stereoscopic lenses for depth perception, arms that swivel out of sockets and go up and down, a torso that flexes to maximize bat momentum. I'd say that it is possible but the cost to build such a robot would be huge and the invention would be impractical. A robot that plays table tennis would be much easier to perfect.

    [/QUOTE]

    Cabbage rolls and coffee, Umm Umm Good.


    Can I ask you question ?  What goes good with cabbage rolls ?

    [/QUOTE]


    [/QUOTE]

    Tenk you.

     

Share