Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from pumpsie-green. Show pumpsie-green's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:

    Actually, he's pretty terrible, and I can provide empirical evidence of that.  The Sox are losing 40% of their games, and no good manager would ever let that happen.  Terry Francona had exactly the same problem.  Scioscia with the Angels has a losing record this year and should have been fired years ago.  Girardi has exactly one WS with the Yankees, enough said. 

    Plus there are numerous specific examples of moves made in games that cost the Sox a win.  Wrong guy from the bullpen, not pulling the starter soon enough or waiting too long, bad lineup, the list is endless.  It's this simple:  good managers don't lose games, period. 

     



    For the record, I believe that overall, Farrell has done a pretty good job at managing the team. There have been some tactical errors IMO, and there are some concerns about burning out some of the players, but overall, not bad. Certainly better than his predecessor.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from LloydDobler. Show LloydDobler's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    Second-guessing the manager is as American as the flag. Why'd he not bunt the runner over? Why'd he not not go lefty-lefty? Why is so-and-so still playing ahead of so-and-so? I'm as guilty as anyone.

    But the fact  is, none of us are qualified. We haven't spent our entire adult life in the game. We're not around the players all day every day. It would be like saying, "I really think the pilot should have decended earlier."

    Given that we're  22 games over  .500 and have the best record in the American League -- on the heels of last year's grease fire -- it seems clear that Farrell is pushing the right buttons.
     

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    In response to LloydDobler's comment:

    Second-guessing the manager is as American as the flag. Why'd he not bunt the runner over? Why'd he not not go lefty-lefty? Why is so-and-so still playing ahead of so-and-so? I'm as guilty as anyone.

    But the fact  is, none of us are qualified. We haven't spent our entire adult life in the game. We're not around the players all day every day. It would be like saying, "I really think the pilot should have decended earlier."

    Given that we're  22 games over  .500 and have the best record in the American League -- on the heels of last year's grease fire -- it seems clear that Farrell is pushing the right buttons.
     



    I haven't seen anything obvious.  I put the team down for 89 wins, and we are way over that, despite loosing WMB, Buchholz, two closers, and a dinged up Drew and Vic.  To assume he is not a good manager, you have to assume we should be on a 100+ win pace.

    It's like when the nimrods said that Tito had cost us 13 games one year, less than halfway through the season.  Had you added back 13 wins at that point, we'd have been on pace for 130 wins.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

    In response to BosoxJoe5's comment:

     

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to Belinsky1962's comment:

     

     


    Many other teams both past and present have power hitters in the middle of their lineup that strike out too much. In fact, power hitters take harder swings and swing earlier to go for the HR since that is why they were hired. It goes with the territory. This problem is not unique.

     

     



    I am not sure you can consider Napoli a "power hitter" any more, at least not since May 1. Power hitters by definition HIT, and generally have a good OPS. Napoli is doing neither.

     

     



    Base on his stats he is probably the best person on this team to hit 5. Unless you would rather use Navs who since the All Star break has hardlu payed and is out until Thursday.

     

     



    They have played 17 games since the ASB. Its such a small sample size that its no wonder folks like you enjoy quoting them. I showed you his stats vs those of Nava vs RHP, and they are inferior. They are also FAR inferior to those of Carp. You just weren't paying attention. Now you will have to look them up by yourself.

     



    If you don't want to compare Naps stats with Nava since the ASB, then use their career stats.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    In response to DirtyWaterLover's comment:

    I thought letting Drew hit away with a man on third and 1 out was a bad decision.  Should of done a safety squeeze.  Lefty lefty match up, plus the pitcher is red hot and the hitter isn't.  1-0 game. Had safety squeeze written all over it.  And if anyone should be able to bunt, it's Drew.  I wouldn't squeeze if ellsbury or Ortiz had been the lefty batter, but Drew - no question.



    Drew kind of is red hot over the past ten games.

    Salty is slower than I am.

    Teams don't usually play for a tie on the road.

    I wouldn't thought much either way, but I wouldn't have done so.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    In response to Javi60's comment:

    Most of your posts imply that my concern about Farrell as manager-strategist that is questionable, could be valid, that  he resembles more to  Tito, than a La Russa, Showalter, Melvyn , Girardi or Joe madden, the best of the best....frequently,  nice guys that are  loved in the Clubhouse, become automatic pilots, they win when team wins by itself... Alston used to say that only managers win or lose close games... Believe he was right, believe regretfully that Farrell loses more close games than he wins... Time will tell...hope I am wrong... go sox tonight hopefully with shuffled line up...



    We are 16-11 in one-run games, so that is not losing more close games than you win.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Javi60. Show Javi60's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

    In response to BosoxJoe5's comment:

     

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to Belinsky1962's comment:

     

     


    Many other teams both past and present have power hitters in the middle of their lineup that strike out too much. In fact, power hitters take harder swings and swing earlier to go for the HR since that is why they were hired. It goes with the territory. This problem is not unique.

     

     



    I am not sure you can consider Napoli a "power hitter" any more, at least not since May 1. Power hitters by definition HIT, and generally have a good OPS. Napoli is doing neither.

     

     



    Base on his stats he is probably the best person on this team to hit 5. Unless you would rather use Navs who since the All Star break has hardlu payed and is out until Thursday.

     

     



    They have played 17 games since the ASB. Its such a small sample size that its no wonder folks like you enjoy quoting them. I showed you his stats vs those of Nava vs RHP, and they are inferior. They are also FAR inferior to those of Carp. You just weren't paying attention. Now you will have to look them up by yourself.

     




     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Javi60. Show Javi60's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    Who can explain why Workman, after three impressive starts, has been demoted to bull pen and rookie who did well in relief is starting today with a wacky knuckler that even  Mirabelli could not handle... Already down 3 to zero!

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    In response to Javi60's comment:

    Who can explain why Workman, after three impressive starts, has been demoted to bull pen and rookie who did well in relief is starting today with a wacky knuckler that even  Mirabelli could not handle... Already down 3 to zero!



    Pure guess, but my guess is that, since Workman was going to work out of the BP, they wanted to get him started.  Workman had done well, but Wright has done well also, with -0- ERs in two appearances over 8.2.

    Sometimes #6/7 SPs get rocked.

    Sometimes your AAA prospects get rocked coming out of the BP.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from fizsh. Show fizsh's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    Plus Workman was only able to come up because Nava is on paternity leave.  Otherwise Workman would have had to stay down until the weekend.  He wasn't expecting to start today, Wright was.

    If a manager doesn't have confidence in his ball players, even when they're going badly, they're not going to have confidence in themselves. And when a ballplayer's confidence is gone, you haven't got a ballplayer - Birdie Tebbetts

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from dgalehouse. Show dgalehouse's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    You have to give Farrell credit for recognizing the mistake and getting Wright out of there before things got out of hand. 

    Stabbed by Foulke.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from pumpsie-green. Show pumpsie-green's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to BosoxJoe5's comment:

     

     

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to Belinsky1962's comment:

     

     


    Many other teams both past and present have power hitters in the middle of their lineup that strike out too much. In fact, power hitters take harder swings and swing earlier to go for the HR since that is why they were hired. It goes with the territory. This problem is not unique.

     

     



    I am not sure you can consider Napoli a "power hitter" any more, at least not since May 1. Power hitters by definition HIT, and generally have a good OPS. Napoli is doing neither.

     

     



    Base on his stats he is probably the best person on this team to hit 5. Unless you would rather use Navs who since the All Star break has hardlu payed and is out until Thursday.

     

     

     



    They have played 17 games since the ASB. Its such a small sample size that its no wonder folks like you enjoy quoting them. I showed you his stats vs those of Nava vs RHP, and they are inferior. They are also FAR inferior to those of Carp. You just weren't paying attention. Now you will have to look them up by yourself.

     

     



    If you don't want to compare Naps stats with Nava since the ASB, then use their career stats.

     



    No thanks, but I will use this season's splits to see who should be batting behind Ortiz.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    In response to LloydDobler's comment:

    Second-guessing the manager is as American as the flag. Why'd he not bunt the runner over? Why'd he not not go lefty-lefty? Why is so-and-so still playing ahead of so-and-so? I'm as guilty as anyone.

    But the fact  is, none of us are qualified. We haven't spent our entire adult life in the game. We're not around the players all day every day. It would be like saying, "I really think the pilot should have decended earlier."



    Exactly.  Armchair managers are hilarious, although when they get too sure of their own opinions they can also be pretty annoying.  

     

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from BosoxJoe5. Show BosoxJoe5's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

    In response to BosoxJoe5's comment:

     

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to Belinsky1962's comment:

     

     


    Many other teams both past and present have power hitters in the middle of their lineup that strike out too much. In fact, power hitters take harder swings and swing earlier to go for the HR since that is why they were hired. It goes with the territory. This problem is not unique.

     

     



    I am not sure you can consider Napoli a "power hitter" any more, at least not since May 1. Power hitters by definition HIT, and generally have a good OPS. Napoli is doing neither.

     

     



    Base on his stats he is probably the best person on this team to hit 5. Unless you would rather use Navs who since the All Star break has hardlu payed and is out until Thursday.

     

     



    They have played 17 games since the ASB. Its such a small sample size that its no wonder folks like you enjoy quoting them. I showed you his stats vs those of Nava vs RHP, and they are inferior. They are also FAR inferior to those of Carp. You just weren't paying attention. Now you will have to look them up by yourself.

     



    Why hasn't Nava been playing before he left to have his kid? This starts have dropped for Gomes and Carp. You can't have two lefties in the middle of the lineup. Two righties are fine but you simply can't have Carp bat behind Ortiz. So pragmatically you are forced to use Napoli.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from LloydDobler. Show LloydDobler's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    In response to dgalehouse's comment:

    You have to give Farrell credit for recognizing the mistake and getting Wright out of there before things got out of hand. 

    Stabbed by Foulke.




    I missed the first  inning. Was  it all Wright,  or was Lavarnway having trouble catching  him? Or a little of both?

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThefourBs. Show ThefourBs's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    In response to LloydDobler's comment:

    In response to dgalehouse's comment:

     

    You have to give Farrell credit for recognizing the mistake and getting Wright out of there before things got out of hand. 

    Stabbed by Foulke.

     




    I missed the first  inning. Was  it all Wright,  or was Lavarnway having trouble catching  him? Or a little of both?

     




    It was both.

    Wright was all over the place, but there were some pitches Lavarnway should've handled, but didn't.

     
  17. This post has been removed.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from CubanPete. Show CubanPete's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    In response to LloydDobler's comment:

    Second-guessing the manager is as American as the flag. Why'd he not bunt the runner over? Why'd he not not go lefty-lefty? Why is so-and-so still playing ahead of so-and-so? I'm as guilty as anyone.

    But the fact  is, none of us are qualified. We haven't spent our entire adult life in the game. We're not around the players all day every day. It would be like saying, "I really think the pilot should have decended earlier."

    Given that we're  22 games over  .500 and have the best record in the American League -- on the heels of last year's grease fire -- it seems clear that Farrell is pushing the right buttons.
     




    So, by your logic we should have never questioned Grady Little after game 7 in the 2003 ALCS, when he kept Pedro in for an unprecedented 8th inning while Timlin had 5.1 IP in the series, allowing only 2 BBs and 1 hit, 6Ks?

    Baseball has advanced to the point that there are now accepted do's and don't's: like bunting, or keeping a guy with an OBP below .340 at the #2 spot in the lineup, etc.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from pumpsie-green. Show pumpsie-green's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    In response to BosoxJoe5's comment:

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to BosoxJoe5's comment:

     

     

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to Belinsky1962's comment:

     

     


    Many other teams both past and present have power hitters in the middle of their lineup that strike out too much. In fact, power hitters take harder swings and swing earlier to go for the HR since that is why they were hired. It goes with the territory. This problem is not unique.

     

     



    I am not sure you can consider Napoli a "power hitter" any more, at least not since May 1. Power hitters by definition HIT, and generally have a good OPS. Napoli is doing neither.

     

     



    Base on his stats he is probably the best person on this team to hit 5. Unless you would rather use Navs who since the All Star break has hardlu payed and is out until Thursday.

     

     

     



    They have played 17 games since the ASB. Its such a small sample size that its no wonder folks like you enjoy quoting them. I showed you his stats vs those of Nava vs RHP, and they are inferior. They are also FAR inferior to those of Carp. You just weren't paying attention. Now you will have to look them up by yourself.

     

     



    Why hasn't Nava been playing before he left to have his kid? This starts have dropped for Gomes and Carp. You can't have two lefties in the middle of the lineup. Two righties are fine but you simply can't have Carp bat behind Ortiz. So pragmatically you are forced to use Napoli.

     



    Thats a very good question! Nava SHOULD have been batting fifth, behind Ortiz, vs RHP unless Carp plays in which case I think its fine to have consecutive LHH because Ortiz and Carp both have OPS vs RHP close to 1.000. In the sixth spot I would put a right hander or a switch hitter and move KNap down to 7 or 8.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    In response to CubanPete's comment:

    Baseball has advanced to the point that there are now accepted do's and don't's: like bunting, or keeping a guy with an OBP below .340 at the #2 spot in the lineup, etc.



    What exactly are you saying about bunting?  Bunt when and why?  Kind of a generalized statement there. 

     

     

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from LloydDobler. Show LloydDobler's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    In response to CubanPete's comment:

    So, by your logic we should have never questioned Grady Little after game 7 in the 2003 ALCS, when he kept Pedro in for an unprecedented 8th inning while Timlin had 5.1 IP in the series, allowing only 2 BBs and 1 hit, 6Ks?

    Baseball has advanced to the point that there are now accepted do's and don't's: like bunting, or keeping a guy with an OBP below .340 at the #2 spot in the lineup, etc.

    Of course you can question that, or anything else you want. This is America. But also understand this: Had Pedro pitched out of that jam, everyone would have praised Grady for having faith in his ace. Instead, it failed, so it was a huge blunder that cost him his job.

    There have been "accepted dos and don't" for as long as sports have been around. One don't is not to begin the second half of the Super Bowl with an onside kick, but it worked pretty well for Sean Payton. Had the Colts recovered and went on to win, how much crap would he have taken?

     

     

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from maxbialystock. Show maxbialystock's posts

    Re: Is Farrell a good dugout manager?

    Let me make one thing clear.  Farrell is in fact a good dugout manager.  Yes, he has also been good at creating chemistry and especially at respecting veterans without overdoing it. 

    I completely disagreed with starting Wright last night because of what happened in the first inning.  Then I read Nick Cafardo's piece that explained what Farrell was thinking--against Houston and a weak starter, Wright had pitched very well, Workman headed for the bullpen, and, interestingly, the expectation that in an enclosed ballpark the knuckler would be really effective.  Ironically, the knuckler was so effective Lavarnway couldn't catch it despite having no problem catching Wright and his knuckler several times (8 games, reportedly) in the past.  Both Lavarnway and Wright said the ball was really moving, more than ever before, and that was the problem.

    I still disagree with starting Wright because Workman was availalbe, but I give Farrell--we are talking about dugout management, I believe--for letting Wright finish the first inning, but bringing Workman in to start the 2d inning.  A failed experiment, but he limited the damage.  Also worth noting, I think, is the lineup was more than willing to have the manager's back by pulverizing the Astros staff for 15 runs. 

    I normally, usually defend Farrell, but not always.  I still think Iglesias should have been the pinchrunner in that one loss and not Nava.  And last night, even though Farrell handled the disaster well, I fault him for starting Wright instead of Workman.  I am sure he has made other mistakes--if indeed I am right in calling those two examples mistakes--but by and large think he has a very good rationale for everything he does.  I also think he is masterful with the players--giving rookies like Iglesias their shot, but also treating veterans well.  His guys basically can't bunt worth a darn, but that, I'm afraid, is the fault of Bill James and John Henry. 

     
Sections
Shortcuts

Share