Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

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    Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    From WEEI.com:

    It's hard to figure out where it started for Jacoby Ellsbury

    On his way out of the clubhouse Wednesday night -- about an hour after teammates had given him the celebratory business for a second straight night thanks to a walk-off, ninth-inning homer -- Ellsbury offered a hint.

    "In Little League," he said, "I hit 17 home runs in 16 games." (There was no time to verify. It would just have to be assumed to be true.)

    Perhaps that was instance Ellsbury became a superstar. Others would argue another jumping off point, whether it be when he ran down a deer at the age of 11, starred at Oregon State, or put on an American League All-Star uniform.

    "Dude, he's good," Red Sox designated hitter David Ortiz said of Ellsbury. "He's learning how to play the game. Everything comes down to a lot of hard work and experience, and that's what he's taking advantage of right now.

    "Ells has always been a superstar to me. He just has sometimes health problems, but he plays the game like a superstar. That's the reason why this organization has waited for a while because they believe in what he's got, what he can do. And he's coming through like they expected."

    This was the biggest takeaway from the Red Sox' 4-3 win over the Indians Wednesday night: the moment Ellsbury's line drive cleared the centerfield fence, making him the first Red Sox player to notch back-to-back walk-off RBI since Butch Hobson in 1978, he could wear the badge befitting the best. He might have been Ortiz' superstar for some time now, but it has been a process that led the outfielder to this punctuating point.

    Ellsbury is hitting .317 with a .373 on-base percentage and .886 OP. He has hit 18 home runs and swiped 31 bases. How do these numbers rate among American League outfielders? Averge: Second; OBP: Fourth; OPS: Fifth; Homers: Fourth; Stolen bases: Third.

    "I heard great things about him coming into the season," said Red Sox first baseman Adrian Gonzalez. "I wasn't around for the last couple years to see where he was, but he's definitely put himself in part of the elite center fielders in the league."

    But, even with the prolific home run tear in Little League, the road to this moment -- when we can legitimately call Ellsbury a superstar -- has offered a reminder that patience is perhaps an organization's, and player's, most important attribute.

    Just after Ellsbury was selected in the 2005 draft, the image of the outfielder leading off his Oregon State baseball team's College World Series game came on the Red Sox' clubhouse television. Some players understood the irony. "Hey Johnny," relief pitcher Alan Embree yelled over to then-Red Sox centerfielder Johnny Damon, "your replacement is on TV." The young leadoff hitter wouldn't disappoint, beating out a routine grounder to shortstop.
     Then there was trying to figure out exactly what Ellsbury was. While playing in the Arizona Fall League, he was instructed to bunt at least twice a game by his AFL manager, and former Red Sox coach, Luis Alicea. It was a weapon the organization raved about as the outfielder moved through the system, and ultimately translated into eight bunt hits in '09. The evolution, however, has led to not a single bunt single this season.

    While many remember his ninth-inning catch the World Series-clinching game in Colorado, it is sometimes forgotten that it wasn't until the sixth game of the American League Championship series that Ellsbury was inserted in the lineup, having accumulated one at-bat in the Sox' first eight playoff games that year. The Red Sox wouldn't lose another game once he took over for Coco Crisp.

    Then came the transformation into an everyday player, starting in '08. But, again, despite his solid season (hitting .280 with 50 SBs in 145 games), he would lose his starting job by the fourth game of the American League Championship Series, having gone hitless in his 14 at-bats against Tampa Bay. A year after Ellsbury's perceived postseason breakout, fortunes of Ellsbury and Crisp had flipped.

    In '09, when the centerfield job was officially Ellsbury's, what is now looked back at the first true example of what the Red Sox had -- a season in which he hit .301 while stealing 70 bases -- there was a major bump in the road many forget. After going 0-for-4 in a May 30 game against Toronto, the outfielder was moved out of the leadoff spot. He was hitting .299, but only carried a .332 on-base percentage (.268 vs. lefties). Yet, it would seem, while hitting lower in the order, Ellsbury learned a lesson, bouncing back with a .391 OBP in June, including a .516 OBP against lefties.

    And while many viewed the injury drama of '10 as Ellsbury's last great roadblock, it should be noted that this season didn't exactly start out swimmingly. He was once again yanked from the leadoff spot, having lived under .200 for the first 20 days of the season. But once he reentered life at the top of the order, on April 22, there has been no looking back, hitting .337 with a .388 OBP and .918 OPS (second-best on the team).

    Now you have your superstar.

    Despite what those tuning in the last two games might suggest, it didn't happen overnight.

    "He's a guy that's always asking questions. We're always talking," Gonzalez said. "It's just incredible what he can do."

     
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    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    m
     
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    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    In Response to Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar:
    [QUOTE]From WEEI.com: It's hard to figure out where it started for Jacoby Ellsbury .  On his way out of the clubhouse Wednesday night -- about an hour after teammates had given him the celebratory business for a second straight night thanks to a walk-off, ninth-inning homer -- Ellsbury offered a hint. "In Little League ," he said, "I hit 17 home runs in 16 games." (There was no time to verify. It would just have to be assumed to be true.) Perhaps that was instance Ellsbury became a superstar. Others would argue another jumping off point, whether it be when he ran down a deer at the age of 11, starred at Oregon State, or put on an American League All-Star uniform. "Dude, he's good," Red Sox designated hitter David Ortiz said of Ellsbury. "He's learning how to play the game. Everything comes down to a lot of hard work and experience, and that's what he's taking advantage of right now. "Ells has always been a superstar to me. He just has sometimes health problems, but he plays the game like a superstar. That's the reason why this organization has waited for a while because they believe in what he's got, what he can do. And he's coming through like they expected." This was the biggest takeaway from the Red Sox ' 4-3 win over the Indians Wednesday night: the moment Ellsbury's line drive cleared the centerfield fence, making him the first Red Sox player to notch back-to-back walk-off RBI since Butch Hobson in 1978, he could wear the badge befitting the best. He might have been Ortiz' superstar for some time now, but it has been a process that led the outfielder to this punctuating point. Ellsbury is hitting .317 with a .373 on-base percentage and .886 OP. He has hit 18 home runs and swiped 31 bases. How do these numbers rate among American League outfielders? Averge: Second; OBP: Fourth; OPS: Fifth; Homers: Fourth; Stolen bases: Third. "I heard great things about him coming into the season," said Red Sox first baseman Adrian Gonzalez. "I wasn't around for the last couple years to see where he was, but he's definitely put himself in part of the elite center fielders in the league." But, even with the prolific home run tear in Little League , the road to this moment -- when we can legitimately call Ellsbury a superstar -- has offered a reminder that patience is perhaps an organization's, and player's, most important attribute. Just after Ellsbury was selected in the 2005 draft, the image of the outfielder leading off his Oregon State baseball team's College World Series game came on the Red Sox' clubhouse television. Some players understood the irony. "Hey Johnny," relief pitcher Alan Embree yelled over to then-Red Sox centerfielder Johnny Damon , "your replacement is on TV." The young leadoff hitter wouldn't disappoint, beating out a routine grounder to shortstop.  Then there was trying to figure out exactly what Ellsbury was. While playing in the Arizona Fall League, he was instructed to bunt at least twice a game by his AFL manager, and former Red Sox coach, Luis Alicea. It was a weapon the organization raved about as the outfielder moved through the system, and ultimately translated into eight bunt hits in '09. The evolution, however, has led to not a single bunt single this season. While many remember his ninth-inning catch the World Series-clinching game in Colorado, it is sometimes forgotten that it wasn't until the sixth game of the American League Championship series that Ellsbury was inserted in the lineup, having accumulated one at-bat in the Sox' first eight playoff games that year. The Red Sox wouldn't lose another game once he took over for Coco Crisp . Then came the transformation into an everyday player, starting in '08. But, again, despite his solid season (hitting .280 with 50 SBs in 145 games), he would lose his starting job by the fourth game of the American League Championship Series , having gone hitless in his 14 at-bats against Tampa Bay. A year after Ellsbury's perceived postseason breakout, fortunes of Ellsbury and Crisp had flipped. In '09, when the centerfield job was officially Ellsbury's, what is now looked back at the first true example of what the Red Sox had -- a season in which he hit .301 while stealing 70 bases -- there was a major bump in the road many forget. After going 0-for-4 in a May 30 game against Toronto, the outfielder was moved out of the leadoff spot. He was hitting .299, but only carried a .332 on-base percentage (.268 vs. lefties). Yet, it would seem, while hitting lower in the order, Ellsbury learned a lesson, bouncing back with a .391 OBP in June, including a .516 OBP against lefties. And while many viewed the injury drama of '10 as Ellsbury's last great roadblock, it should be noted that this season didn't exactly start out swimmingly. He was once again yanked from the leadoff spot, having lived under .200 for the first 20 days of the season. But once he reentered life at the top of the order, on April 22, there has been no looking back, hitting .337 with a .388 OBP and .918 OPS (second-best on the team). Now you have your superstar. Despite what those tuning in the last two games might suggest, it didn't happen overnight. "He's a guy that's always asking questions. We're always talking," Gonzalez said. "It's just incredible what he can do."
    Posted by mrmojo1120[/QUOTE]

    Slight error in the author’s research.

     

    David Ortiz had back-to-back walk off hits in games 4 and 5 of the 2004 ALCS.  In Game 4, he hit a 12th inning HR off Paul Quantrill , and then ended Game 5 with a 14th inning RBI single off Esteban Loaiza to drive in Johnny Damon, leading to what was easily the best call ever by John Buck.  (“Damon rounds third, and he can run all the way to New York!  We’re going to Game 6!”)

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from maxbialystock. Show maxbialystock's posts

    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    Notin, I'm sorry but the many, many Manny fans on this board will assure that in 2004 it was Manny and no one else--not big Papi, not Schilling, no one.  Just Manny. 
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from softylaw. Show softylaw's posts

    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    Not a superstar at all.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from saxydogg77. Show saxydogg77's posts

    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    In Response to Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar:
    [QUOTE]Not a superstar at all.
    Posted by softylaw[/QUOTE]

    Wow.  Saddest post yet, softlaw.  Tell us, why exactly is Ellsbury NOT a superstar "at all?"  You forgot to provide an argument.  Has the overwhelming mountain of evidence to the contrary finally crushed your fool brain?  He was a first round pick and he's living up to his billing.  It's not that big of a mystery as to why he is an electric All-Star worthy of top billing and a top paycheck.  He was supposed to be.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from canetime. Show canetime's posts

    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    In Response to Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar:
    [QUOTE]Not a superstar at all.
    Posted by softylaw[/QUOTE]

    keep trying FOOL!
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from TheExaminer. Show TheExaminer's posts

    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    In Response to Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar : keep trying FOOL!
    Posted by canetime[/QUOTE]

    It's all he has left after this week. Ignore him.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from PawsoxPhil. Show PawsoxPhil's posts

    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    It seems to me in my short time here  that Softylaw is just here to pull everyone's chain or rattle your cage just for the sake of it for his pleasure. Am I correct?
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from saxydogg77. Show saxydogg77's posts

    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    In Response to Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar:
    [QUOTE]It seems to me in my short time here  that Softylaw is just here to pull everyone's chain or rattle your cage just for the sake of it for his pleasure. Am I correct?
    Posted by PawsoxPhil[/QUOTE]

    Sort of.  Turns out that softlaw believes everything that he posts because he's racist against anyone who's skin is darker than his own.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from softylaw. Show softylaw's posts

    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    No 9th in AL OPS for one season and inferior season to AGon, Pedroia and Ortiz, on his own team, is a "superstar".
     
    As for racist, I'm part Cherokee and have regularly and correctly pointed out the racist favoritism and double standard in Boston against descendants of African natives, and Japanese players.

    Ortiz is having a a better season than Ellsbury, and so is Granderson.

    Ellsbury career averages show he isn't a superstar, anymore than Crawford is.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    Ellsbury has proven that he is serious about becoming the best player he possibly can be. That's good enough for me. Keep up the good work, Ells, we are all rooting for you to succeed and become a star player.
     
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    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    In Response to Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar:
    [QUOTE]No 9th in AL OPS for one season and inferior season to AGon, Pedroia and Ortiz, on his own team, is a "superstar".   As for racist, I'm part Cherokee and have regularly and correctly pointed out the racist favoritism and double standard in Boston against descendants of African natives, and Japanese players. Ortiz is having a a better season than Ellsbury, and so is Granderson. Ellsbury career averages show he isn't a superstar, anymore than Crawford is.
    Posted by softylaw[/QUOTE]

    So now the argument has become whether or not Ells is a superstar.  It's good to see that you're coming around, it's just disappointing that it took so long. 
     
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    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    In Response to Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar:
    [QUOTE]No 9th in AL OPS for one season and inferior season to AGon, Pedroia and Ortiz, on his own team, is a "superstar".   As for racist, I'm part Cherokee and have regularly and correctly pointed out the racist favoritism and double standard in Boston against descendants of African natives, and Japanese players. Ortiz is having a a better season than Ellsbury, and so is Granderson. Ellsbury career averages show he isn't a superstar, anymore than Crawford is.
    Posted by softylaw[/QUOTE]

    So being part Cherokee I think that you are jealous of Ellsbury. Could that explain the hatred?
     
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    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    While Els is having a Superstar type of season, it is just that, 1 Season. I think his upside will continue to grow as the next couple of seasons play out and at that time, after he has done it for a few seasons, he will be a Superstar !! Just in time for a Big PayDay !!
     
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    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    Kind of an interesting tidbit from MLBTraderumors.com:

  17. The Red Sox were willing to discuss a trade with the Cardinals involving center fielders Jacoby Ellsbury and Colby Rasmus in 2010, according to Joe Strauss of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch (via Twitter), but the talks never gained traction. That would have been a heck of a trade. Rasmus, of course, was traded by St. Louis to the Blue Jays prior to last month's trade deadline.
 
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    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    In Response to Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar:
    [QUOTE]No 9th in AL OPS for one season and inferior season to AGon, Pedroia and Ortiz, on his own team, is a "superstar".   As for racist, I'm part Cherokee and have regularly and correctly pointed out the racist favoritism and double standard in Boston against descendants of African natives, and Japanese players. Ortiz is having a a better season than Ellsbury, and so is Granderson. Ellsbury career averages show he isn't a superstar, anymore than Crawford is.
    Posted by softylaw[/QUOTE]
     
    Career averages.  Does no one improve from their first full season to their third?  
     
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    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    In Response to Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar:
    [QUOTE]Not a superstar at all.
    Posted by softylaw[/QUOTE]

    same old record softhead!
     
  • You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    I f every MLB superstar was judged by career averages after less than 800 PAs as the clown did of Jacoby in 2008/2009, there'd be hardly any "superstars" ever. Jacoby had about 1,500 PAs before this season. For many players that is the amount of time they need to gain experience, grow, mature, and become the best they can be over the following seasons.

    Jacoby's career numbers going into this season were:
    .291/.344/.405/.749
    He had 20 HRs and 98 extra base hits in 1513 PAs.
    That's about 9 HRs and 44 extra base hits per 680 PAs.

    The clown said we should expect "Jake's career norm" this season, since he never allows for any growth for players he bashes.  There is no expected "prime" for Jake. "Sell high" has been his 3 year mantra. Well, he has just got higher, as most knowledgeable baseball followers would have expected at his age and point of development.

    Jacoby has blown away his career averages this year:
    .317/.373/.513/.886
    18 HRs and 50 extra base hits in just 493 PAs.
    That's about 25 HRs and 69 extra base hits per 680 PAs.

    BA     + 26 points
    OBP   + 29 points
    Slg% +108 pts.

    HRs/680  + 16
    EBH/680  + 25

    He's brought his "career norm" up:
    BA: 6 points
    OBP: 7 points
    SLG: 26 points
    OPS: 33 points

    Silly clown. 
     
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    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    In Response to Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar:
    [QUOTE]No 9th in AL OPS for one season and inferior season to AGon, Pedroia and Ortiz, on his own team, is a "superstar".   As for racist, I'm part Cherokee and have regularly and correctly pointed out the racist favoritism and double standard in Boston against descendants of African natives, and Japanese players. Ortiz is having a a better season than Ellsbury, and so is Granderson. Ellsbury career averages show he isn't a superstar, anymore than Crawford is.
    Posted by softylaw[/QUOTE]

    You said Ellsbury would look better in the racist cleveland indians hat 'but is no jim thorpe'

    you said paul pierce was a 'crack smoking rastiman'

    you are a RACIST

    reviled and hated and banned dozens of times on this board, I pity you and feel sad that someone as disgusting as you exists and claims to be a fan of the team I love. 

    The lie about being part cherokee, never mentioned before in 3 years of racist, hateful and confrontational posts, is a new low for you.

     
  • You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    If his lows keep getting any lower, he'll be in H- E- double hockey sticks pretty soon.
     
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    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    Very nice article about Jacoby. He is a true superstart "right now", and will improve over the next few years. Facts are facts. Softy is without question the very worst Troll that has ever posted on this forum.

    Go Ells!!!!
     
  • You have chosen to ignore posts from softylaw. Show softylaw's posts

    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    Jacoby has blown away his career averages this year:

    Crawford "blew away" is career averages in 2010.
     
  • You have chosen to ignore posts from SpacemanEephus. Show SpacemanEephus's posts

    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    In Response to Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar:
    [QUOTE]Jacoby has blown away his career averages this year: Crawford "blew away" is career averages in 2010.
    Posted by softylaw[/QUOTE]

    You really think that is the same thing?  One guy had a career year in his 8th full major league season.  The other is doing so in his third, his second showing great improvement, only to be ribbed out for a whole year the next.  You see those two cases as similar?  Its not clear to you that Jacoby's performance this year has everything to do with coming into his own as a hitter?  
     
  • You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Jacoby: Not an overnight superstar

    Crawford "blew away" is career averages in 2010.

    He did not blow away his career averages in 2010. Look again at the all the numbers please.
     
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