Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:

     

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:

     

    OP attack on Lester is unmerited.  Plus I really disagree with the image of "not out of the woods" because I didn't think he was in the woods.  That said, I disagree with his reluctance to use the changeup.  He relies too much on his variations on the fastball which are too hittable when not mixed in with effective breaking balls. 

     




    His ERA was 4.82 last year, a year in which his annual velocity drops continued. IMO thats definitely being in the woods.

     

     



    Everyone's velocity drops.  Without context, it is about the same as saying we are getting older.

     

     



    Whatever the reason is for the drop in velocity, its never a good thing. There is much more room for error with a 96 mph fastball than one at 92. So thats a likely reason for Lester's decline last year. I think it was an aberration, last year-but I also do not expect him to somehow shave a full RPG off his ERA by the end of this season. Even 0.6 RPG is a big improvement. I think he can do that. But not much more.

     



    Not always true.  Velocity drop can help a pitcher pitch smarter instead of relying on heat.  The room for error in 96 and 92 is debatable.  yes, you can overpower at 96 and you cannot at 92.  On the other hand, 96 is a little harder to locate, and you might get away with it if a big league hitter is asleep at the wheelhouse, but, a 96 in the slightly wrong place or in the right place but slightly flat is leaving the yard.  Sometimes, a pitcher comes into his own when he can no longer be a "thrower".

     
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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    In response to SpacemanEephus' comment:

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:

     

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:

     

    OP attack on Lester is unmerited.  Plus I really disagree with the image of "not out of the woods" because I didn't think he was in the woods.  That said, I disagree with his reluctance to use the changeup.  He relies too much on his variations on the fastball which are too hittable when not mixed in with effective breaking balls. 

     




    His ERA was 4.82 last year, a year in which his annual velocity drops continued. IMO thats definitely being in the woods.

     

     



    Everyone's velocity drops.  Without context, it is about the same as saying we are getting older.

     

     



    Whatever the reason is for the drop in velocity, its never a good thing. There is much more room for error with a 96 mph fastball than one at 92. So thats a likely reason for Lester's decline last year. I think it was an aberration, last year-but I also do not expect him to somehow shave a full RPG off his ERA by the end of this season. Even 0.6 RPG is a big improvement. I think he can do that. But not much more.

     

     



    Not always true.  Velocity drop can help a pitcher pitch smarter instead of relying on heat.  The room for error in 96 and 92 is debatable.  yes, you can overpower at 96 and you cannot at 92.  On the other hand, 96 is a little harder to locate, and you might get away with it if a big league hitter is asleep at the wheelhouse, but, a 96 in the slightly wrong place or in the right place but slightly flat is leaving the yard.  Sometimes, a pitcher comes into his own when he can no longer be a "thrower".

     




    Of course some pitchers have, by necessity, become better pitchers when their velocity dropped. But all other things being equal (specifically, being able to locate that fastball), I would rather have a guy with heat than a guy who can only throw at 90 or 92. Fastballs at 96+ are hittable by ML players if the pitcher cannot locate it, but with a ball thrown that hard there is more room for error.

     
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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

    In response to SpacemanEephus' comment:

     

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:

     

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:

     

    OP attack on Lester is unmerited.  Plus I really disagree with the image of "not out of the woods" because I didn't think he was in the woods.  That said, I disagree with his reluctance to use the changeup.  He relies too much on his variations on the fastball which are too hittable when not mixed in with effective breaking balls. 

     




    His ERA was 4.82 last year, a year in which his annual velocity drops continued. IMO thats definitely being in the woods.

     

     



    Everyone's velocity drops.  Without context, it is about the same as saying we are getting older.

     

     



    Whatever the reason is for the drop in velocity, its never a good thing. There is much more room for error with a 96 mph fastball than one at 92. So thats a likely reason for Lester's decline last year. I think it was an aberration, last year-but I also do not expect him to somehow shave a full RPG off his ERA by the end of this season. Even 0.6 RPG is a big improvement. I think he can do that. But not much more.

     

     



    Not always true.  Velocity drop can help a pitcher pitch smarter instead of relying on heat.  The room for error in 96 and 92 is debatable.  yes, you can overpower at 96 and you cannot at 92.  On the other hand, 96 is a little harder to locate, and you might get away with it if a big league hitter is asleep at the wheelhouse, but, a 96 in the slightly wrong place or in the right place but slightly flat is leaving the yard.  Sometimes, a pitcher comes into his own when he can no longer be a "thrower".

     

     




    Of course some pitchers have, by necessity, become better pitchers when their velocity dropped. But all other things being equal (specifically, being able to locate that fastball), I would rather have a guy with heat than a guy who can only throw at 90 or 92. Fastballs at 96+ are hittable by ML players if the pitcher cannot locate it, but with a ball thrown that hard there is more room for error.

     



    Perhaps.  I think 98 gives you some room for error, but I am not sure how much there is at 96.  papelbon at 96 became quite human.  Papelbon at 98 was unhittable.

     

     
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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    In response to SpacemanEephus' comment:

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to SpacemanEephus' comment:

     

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:

     

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:

     

    OP attack on Lester is unmerited.  Plus I really disagree with the image of "not out of the woods" because I didn't think he was in the woods.  That said, I disagree with his reluctance to use the changeup.  He relies too much on his variations on the fastball which are too hittable when not mixed in with effective breaking balls. 

     




    His ERA was 4.82 last year, a year in which his annual velocity drops continued. IMO thats definitely being in the woods.

     

     



    Everyone's velocity drops.  Without context, it is about the same as saying we are getting older.

     

     



    Whatever the reason is for the drop in velocity, its never a good thing. There is much more room for error with a 96 mph fastball than one at 92. So thats a likely reason for Lester's decline last year. I think it was an aberration, last year-but I also do not expect him to somehow shave a full RPG off his ERA by the end of this season. Even 0.6 RPG is a big improvement. I think he can do that. But not much more.

     

     



    Not always true.  Velocity drop can help a pitcher pitch smarter instead of relying on heat.  The room for error in 96 and 92 is debatable.  yes, you can overpower at 96 and you cannot at 92.  On the other hand, 96 is a little harder to locate, and you might get away with it if a big league hitter is asleep at the wheelhouse, but, a 96 in the slightly wrong place or in the right place but slightly flat is leaving the yard.  Sometimes, a pitcher comes into his own when he can no longer be a "thrower".

     

     




    Of course some pitchers have, by necessity, become better pitchers when their velocity dropped. But all other things being equal (specifically, being able to locate that fastball), I would rather have a guy with heat than a guy who can only throw at 90 or 92. Fastballs at 96+ are hittable by ML players if the pitcher cannot locate it, but with a ball thrown that hard there is more room for error.

     

     



    Perhaps.  I think 98 gives you some room for error, but I am not sure how much there is at 96.  papelbon at 96 became quite human.  Papelbon at 98 was unhittable.

     

     



    What I am saying is that you have to compare apples to apples. I would rather take a guy throwing at 90 who has pinpoint location than a guy throwing at 98 who cannot locate. I am talking about two guys who CAN locate. The guy who has better velocity has more room for error. Now maybe Lester can become a better pitcher even with his velocity drop; thats possible. Last year's effort did little to convince me of it though.

     
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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

    In response to SpacemanEephus' comment:

     

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to SpacemanEephus' comment:

     

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:

     

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:

     

    OP attack on Lester is unmerited.  Plus I really disagree with the image of "not out of the woods" because I didn't think he was in the woods.  That said, I disagree with his reluctance to use the changeup.  He relies too much on his variations on the fastball which are too hittable when not mixed in with effective breaking balls. 

     




    His ERA was 4.82 last year, a year in which his annual velocity drops continued. IMO thats definitely being in the woods.

     

     



    Everyone's velocity drops.  Without context, it is about the same as saying we are getting older.

     

     



    Whatever the reason is for the drop in velocity, its never a good thing. There is much more room for error with a 96 mph fastball than one at 92. So thats a likely reason for Lester's decline last year. I think it was an aberration, last year-but I also do not expect him to somehow shave a full RPG off his ERA by the end of this season. Even 0.6 RPG is a big improvement. I think he can do that. But not much more.

     

     



    Not always true.  Velocity drop can help a pitcher pitch smarter instead of relying on heat.  The room for error in 96 and 92 is debatable.  yes, you can overpower at 96 and you cannot at 92.  On the other hand, 96 is a little harder to locate, and you might get away with it if a big league hitter is asleep at the wheelhouse, but, a 96 in the slightly wrong place or in the right place but slightly flat is leaving the yard.  Sometimes, a pitcher comes into his own when he can no longer be a "thrower".

     

     




    Of course some pitchers have, by necessity, become better pitchers when their velocity dropped. But all other things being equal (specifically, being able to locate that fastball), I would rather have a guy with heat than a guy who can only throw at 90 or 92. Fastballs at 96+ are hittable by ML players if the pitcher cannot locate it, but with a ball thrown that hard there is more room for error.

     

     



    Perhaps.  I think 98 gives you some room for error, but I am not sure how much there is at 96.  papelbon at 96 became quite human.  Papelbon at 98 was unhittable.

     

     

     



    What I am saying is that you have to compare apples to apples. I would rather take a guy throwing at 90 who has pinpoint location than a guy throwing at 98 who cannot locate. I am talking about two guys who CAN locate. The guy who has better velocity has more room for error. Now maybe Lester can become a better pitcher even with his velocity drop; thats possible. Last year's effort did little to convince me of it though.

     



    I agree Pumpsie.  And I think Lester has been caught in the middle of the reinvention process.  The drop in velocity necessitates the better use of secondary pitches; they must become primary pitches.  A wider arsenal defrays the vulnerability of a hittable fastball.  He developed that cutter, but then began relying on that too much.  So, variety over velocity.  But, also, even if we are talking about  pitchers who can locate their fastball, there is a mentality that comes with a velocity drop that makes the slower fastball more effective.  When one has the Big Cheese, the tendency is to want to come high with it to induce swing and misses.  But a slower fastball can be very effective located low and around the corners (Maddux made a living like this) and it not being a K pitch.  Beckett started to figure this out afew years back  and had a great season in 2011.  But he would fall back on the High Cheese mentality and just get crushed.  Or maybe his beer belly just kept his lower back weak and he just would tire as seasons wore on, unable to finish down in his delivery.  Not sure.

     
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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    In response to TV-Guy's comment:

    When does Pumpsie come out of the woods? Instead of bringing a compass or his GPS device with him on that hike into the wilderness he brought his stethoscope and his Dodger cap. He just screamed at a growling black bear " Don't get me wrong, I am really a Red Sox fan". I do hope that he survives since RSN needs concerned, sincere, genuine, loyal fans like him.



    Pike, I was just having a perfectly interesting discussion with Pumpsie about velocity drop and adjustments by pitchers.  Do you really need to insert this usual freakiness in the midst of this?

     
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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    In response to SpacemanEephus' comment:

    In response to TV-Guy's comment:

     

    When does Pumpsie come out of the woods? Instead of bringing a compass or his GPS device with him on that hike into the wilderness he brought his stethoscope and his Dodger cap. He just screamed at a growling black bear " Don't get me wrong, I am really a Red Sox fan". I do hope that he survives since RSN needs concerned, sincere, genuine, loyal fans like him.

     



    Pike, I was just having a perfectly interesting discussion with Pumpsie about velocity drop and adjustments by pitchers.  Do you really need to insert this usual freakiness in the midst of this?

     




    Dempster is the perfect example of lower velocity and pinpoint location. Mixing his pitches keeping hitters off balance and being able to locate each pitch. I think with him on the Sox the next 2 years can only help Lester out.

     
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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    In response to southpaw777's comment:

    In response to SpacemanEephus' comment:

     

    In response to TV-Guy's comment:

     

    When does Pumpsie come out of the woods? Instead of bringing a compass or his GPS device with him on that hike into the wilderness he brought his stethoscope and his Dodger cap. He just screamed at a growling black bear " Don't get me wrong, I am really a Red Sox fan". I do hope that he survives since RSN needs concerned, sincere, genuine, loyal fans like him.

     



    Pike, I was just having a perfectly interesting discussion with Pumpsie about velocity drop and adjustments by pitchers.  Do you really need to insert this usual freakiness in the midst of this?

     

     




    Dempster is the perfect example of lower velocity and pinpoint location. Mixing his pitches keeping hitters off balance and being able to locate each pitch. I think with him on the Sox the next 2 years can only help Lester out.

     




    Dempster is one prime example; Greg Maddux was certainly not known for his heat, nor is Roy Halladay or Cliff Lee. Those guys keep (or kept) hitters off balance by mixing up locations and speed. And there are plenty of other guys who are or were able to do that, so its certainly possible. There are also guys who never learn. I would submit that Beckett is one example of a guy who has not been able to make the switch from a thrower to a pitcher. If Lester can do it the Sox will be much better off because of it. In his case, as of right now, his fastball velocity is down about 1.5mph from 2010, but his other pitches (aside from his changeup, which he does not use much) are similar to 2010. The separation of velocities is important to guys trying to get batters out. When Bard was useful his fastball was 96+, and his other pitch, the slider, was 86 or so. That difference in velocity made him unhittable at times. Lester has to figure out a way to keep the hitters off balance by increasing the delta of his pitches. My guess is that he won't be able to do it this year, not after such a dismal year last year.

     
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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

    In response to southpaw777's comment:

     

    In response to SpacemanEephus' comment:

     

    In response to TV-Guy's comment:

     

    When does Pumpsie come out of the woods? Instead of bringing a compass or his GPS device with him on that hike into the wilderness he brought his stethoscope and his Dodger cap. He just screamed at a growling black bear " Don't get me wrong, I am really a Red Sox fan". I do hope that he survives since RSN needs concerned, sincere, genuine, loyal fans like him.

     



    Pike, I was just having a perfectly interesting discussion with Pumpsie about velocity drop and adjustments by pitchers.  Do you really need to insert this usual freakiness in the midst of this?

     

     




    Dempster is the perfect example of lower velocity and pinpoint location. Mixing his pitches keeping hitters off balance and being able to locate each pitch. I think with him on the Sox the next 2 years can only help Lester out.

     

     




    Dempster is one prime example; Greg Maddux was certainly not known for his heat, nor is Roy Halladay or Cliff Lee. Those guys keep (or kept) hitters off balance by mixing up locations and speed. And there are plenty of other guys who are or were able to do that, so its certainly possible. There are also guys who never learn. I would submit that Beckett is one example of a guy who has not been able to make the switch from a thrower to a pitcher. If Lester can do it the Sox will be much better off because of it. In his case, as of right now, his fastball velocity is down about 1.5mph from 2010, but his other pitches (aside from his changeup, which he does not use much) are similar to 2010. The separation of velocities is important to guys trying to get batters out. When Bard was useful his fastball was 96+, and his other pitch, the slider, was 86 or so. That difference in velocity made him unhittable at times. Lester has to figure out a way to keep the hitters off balance by increasing the delta of his pitches. My guess is that he won't be able to do it this year, not after such a dismal year last year.

     




    I agree and I think Lester, if he prepares himself for the day when he has to pitch like a Dempster, can make a smooth transition with his current repertoire. Hes still in the 92-94 range and topping out at 95 sometimes, so he has some time. Thats why I think a guy like Dempster, who used to throw heat, can be a good influence the next couple years.

     
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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    In response to southpaw777's comment:

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to southpaw777's comment:

     

    In response to SpacemanEephus' comment:

     

    In response to TV-Guy's comment:

     

    When does Pumpsie come out of the woods? Instead of bringing a compass or his GPS device with him on that hike into the wilderness he brought his stethoscope and his Dodger cap. He just screamed at a growling black bear " Don't get me wrong, I am really a Red Sox fan". I do hope that he survives since RSN needs concerned, sincere, genuine, loyal fans like him.

     



    Pike, I was just having a perfectly interesting discussion with Pumpsie about velocity drop and adjustments by pitchers.  Do you really need to insert this usual freakiness in the midst of this?

     

     




    Dempster is the perfect example of lower velocity and pinpoint location. Mixing his pitches keeping hitters off balance and being able to locate each pitch. I think with him on the Sox the next 2 years can only help Lester out.

     

     




    Dempster is one prime example; Greg Maddux was certainly not known for his heat, nor is Roy Halladay or Cliff Lee. Those guys keep (or kept) hitters off balance by mixing up locations and speed. And there are plenty of other guys who are or were able to do that, so its certainly possible. There are also guys who never learn. I would submit that Beckett is one example of a guy who has not been able to make the switch from a thrower to a pitcher. If Lester can do it the Sox will be much better off because of it. In his case, as of right now, his fastball velocity is down about 1.5mph from 2010, but his other pitches (aside from his changeup, which he does not use much) are similar to 2010. The separation of velocities is important to guys trying to get batters out. When Bard was useful his fastball was 96+, and his other pitch, the slider, was 86 or so. That difference in velocity made him unhittable at times. Lester has to figure out a way to keep the hitters off balance by increasing the delta of his pitches. My guess is that he won't be able to do it this year, not after such a dismal year last year.

     

     




    I agree and I think Lester, if he prepares himself for the day when he has to pitch like a Dempster, can make a smooth transition with his current repertoire. Hes still in the 92-94 range and topping out at 95 sometimes, so he has some time. Thats why I think a guy like Dempster, who used to throw heat, can be a good influence the next couple years.

     



    If Lester can LEARN how to do it this year I will be happy, though the results will be mixed. His average fastball right now is 92; thats really not enough to blow it by ML hitters. I do not think that Lester is stubborn a-la Beckett, and I think he will realize that he has to change the way he pitches. If he can lower his ERA by half a run per game this year and do it again next year thats progress and its realistic. I do not think he can lower his ERA a full RPG this year. We'll see.

     
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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    Whatever the reason is for the drop in velocity, its never a good thing. There is much more room for error with a 96 mph fastball than one at 92. So thats a likely reason for Lester's decline last year. I think it was an aberration, last year-but I also do not expect him to somehow shave a full RPG off his ERA by the end of this season. Even 0.6 RPG is a big improvement. I think he can do that. But not much more.

    Again, without context, the reference to the drop in velocity never being a good thing is meaningless.  Everyone's velocity drops every single year.

    What you'd want to do is to overlay the typical WAR decline graph over the typical velocity drop graph to get a meaningful set of data points.  That's where you'd start to relate a drop in production with the drop in velocity.

    BTW, without looking, rank the velocity for Verlander, Felix Hernandez, and Lester this year.  Think about it for a while, and get back to me.

     
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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    In response to softlaw2's comment:

    I thought the WAR decline graph showed a meaningful set of data points for Webster.



    Sober up dude.  This is a thread about Lester.

     
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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:

    Whatever the reason is for the drop in velocity, its never a good thing. There is much more room for error with a 96 mph fastball than one at 92. So thats a likely reason for Lester's decline last year. I think it was an aberration, last year-but I also do not expect him to somehow shave a full RPG off his ERA by the end of this season. Even 0.6 RPG is a big improvement. I think he can do that. But not much more.

    Again, without context, the reference to the drop in velocity never being a good thing is meaningless.  Everyone's velocity drops every single year.

    What you'd want to do is to overlay the typical WAR decline graph over the typical velocity drop graph to get a meaningful set of data points.  That's where you'd start to relate a drop in production with the drop in velocity.

    BTW, without looking, rank the velocity for Verlander, Felix Hernandez, and Lester this year.  Think about it for a while, and get back to me.



    Everyone's velocity drops every year? You know that is not true. For example, from 08 to 09 Lester's velocity INCREASED. Besides, its not all about the velocity: its a combination of velocity of the fastball, the difference in speeds of the fastball and the offspeed pitches, and most importantly, location. When the fastball is decreasing in velocity the location has to be better and/or the difference in speeds of the pitches has to be greater for a pitcher to be effective. I do not believe Lester can learn to become that kind of pitcher in one year.
    In answer to your question, my guess is Verlander-Lester-Hernandez, but I am not going to bother looking it up since I know you will correct me here if I am wrong.

     

     
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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    In response to BurritoT-'s comment:

    joe Lester for Zorbist straight up?



    No one is a bigger fan of Zobrist than I am, but my pitching sucks.

    Let me think about it.

     
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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:

     

    Whatever the reason is for the drop in velocity, its never a good thing. There is much more room for error with a 96 mph fastball than one at 92. So thats a likely reason for Lester's decline last year. I think it was an aberration, last year-but I also do not expect him to somehow shave a full RPG off his ERA by the end of this season. Even 0.6 RPG is a big improvement. I think he can do that. But not much more.

    Again, without context, the reference to the drop in velocity never being a good thing is meaningless.  Everyone's velocity drops every single year.

    What you'd want to do is to overlay the typical WAR decline graph over the typical velocity drop graph to get a meaningful set of data points.  That's where you'd start to relate a drop in production with the drop in velocity.

    BTW, without looking, rank the velocity for Verlander, Felix Hernandez, and Lester this year.  Think about it for a while, and get back to me.

     



    Everyone's velocity drops every year? You know that is not true. For example, from 08 to 09 Lester's velocity INCREASED. Besides, its not all about the velocity: its a combination of velocity of the fastball, the difference in speeds of the fastball and the offspeed pitches, and most importantly, location. When the fastball is decreasing in velocity the location has to be better and/or the difference in speeds of the pitches has to be greater for a pitcher to be effective. I do not believe Lester can learn to become that kind of pitcher in one year.
    In answer to your question, my guess is Verlander-Lester-Hernandez, but I am not going to bother looking it up since I know you will correct me here if I am wrong.

     

     



    Lester is faster than both.  Lester has actually declined very, very little for someone of his advanced years, from 93.7 to 92.5.  Verlander has declined from 95.6 to 92.2.  Felixs has declined from 95.8 to 91.1.

    So let's go to fun fact #2.  Now that we know Lester throws hard than Verlander and Felix, of the 50 SPs, 29 years or older, that FG lists as qualified for IPs, guess where Lester is ranked?

     
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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    5-0, 2.73.

     
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    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:

    In response to pumpsie-green's comment:

     

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:

     

    Whatever the reason is for the drop in velocity, its never a good thing. There is much more room for error with a 96 mph fastball than one at 92. So thats a likely reason for Lester's decline last year. I think it was an aberration, last year-but I also do not expect him to somehow shave a full RPG off his ERA by the end of this season. Even 0.6 RPG is a big improvement. I think he can do that. But not much more.

    Again, without context, the reference to the drop in velocity never being a good thing is meaningless.  Everyone's velocity drops every single year.

    What you'd want to do is to overlay the typical WAR decline graph over the typical velocity drop graph to get a meaningful set of data points.  That's where you'd start to relate a drop in production with the drop in velocity.

    BTW, without looking, rank the velocity for Verlander, Felix Hernandez, and Lester this year.  Think about it for a while, and get back to me.

     



    Everyone's velocity drops every year? You know that is not true. For example, from 08 to 09 Lester's velocity INCREASED. Besides, its not all about the velocity: its a combination of velocity of the fastball, the difference in speeds of the fastball and the offspeed pitches, and most importantly, location. When the fastball is decreasing in velocity the location has to be better and/or the difference in speeds of the pitches has to be greater for a pitcher to be effective. I do not believe Lester can learn to become that kind of pitcher in one year.
    In answer to your question, my guess is Verlander-Lester-Hernandez, but I am not going to bother looking it up since I know you will correct me here if I am wrong.

     

     

     



    Lester is faster than both.  Lester has actually declined very, very little for someone of his advanced years, from 93.7 to 92.5.  Verlander has declined from 95.6 to 92.2.  Felixs has declined from 95.8 to 91.1.

     

    So let's go to fun fact #2.  Now that we know Lester throws hard than Verlander and Felix, of the 50 SPs, 29 years or older, that FG lists as qualified for IPs, guess where Lester is ranked?



    Thats not correct Breidey. Verlander's fastball is listed at 93.3 and Lester is listed at 92.0 as of right now.

    I suspect Lester is listed as #1 or thereabouts. How many innings you pitch does not matter as much as the quality of those innings. Would you rather have Lester or Verlander or Felix on your team? Why?

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Jon Lester is not out of the woods just yet

    According to Gameday, 4 of the pitches Lester threw to the game's last hitter were at 94.  And he was over 110 pitches at that point.  This was a very encouraging game for Lester.

     

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