June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    Hard to believe ladies and gents that it was 69 years ago today that the greatest armarda ever assembled hit the beaches of france to eventually crush the axis powers and end the war in europe. There are not too many WW2 war veterans left as they are in their late eighties to mid nineties. As I stood at attention during the national anthem last night at my sons graduation I thought about today and the sacrifices that those hero's made and the generations that have followed since. Funny thing about last night. I watched about 5 youngsters that stayed seated with their buds in their ears during the anthem and my mrs knew my anger at seeing this and took my hand and squeezed it with total understanding.

    Freedom was never free. It was earned.....at incredible sacrifice.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThefourBs. Show ThefourBs's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    Hard to believe ladies and gents that it was 69 years ago today that the greatest armarda ever assembled hit the beaches of france to eventually crush the axis powers and end the war in europe. There are not too many WW2 war veterans left as they are in their late eighties to mid nineties. As I stood at attention during the national anthem last night at my sons graduation I thought about today and the sacrifices that those hero's made and the generations that have followed since. Funny thing about last night. I watched about 5 youngsters that stayed seated with their buds in their ears during the anthem and my mrs knew my anger at seeing this and took my hand and squeezed it with total understanding.

    Freedom was never free. It was earned.....at incredible sacrifice.



    Excellent post , Hammah.


    I can't imagine the amount of bravery it took for those men to hit those beaches, in the midst of all the firepower the Nazis had assembled on the coast.

    Too bad some people still don't get it.

    Thanks to service men and women, like yourself, people here are also free to act like jackazzes, as well as respectful Americans.


    Their parents probably act the same way. What can you do?

     

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    In response to ThefourBs' comment:

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    Hard to believe ladies and gents that it was 69 years ago today that the greatest armarda ever assembled hit the beaches of france to eventually crush the axis powers and end the war in europe. There are not too many WW2 war veterans left as they are in their late eighties to mid nineties. As I stood at attention during the national anthem last night at my sons graduation I thought about today and the sacrifices that those hero's made and the generations that have followed since. Funny thing about last night. I watched about 5 youngsters that stayed seated with their buds in their ears during the anthem and my mrs knew my anger at seeing this and took my hand and squeezed it with total understanding.

    Freedom was never free. It was earned.....at incredible sacrifice.

     



    Excellent post , Hammah.

     


    I can't imagine the amount of bravery it took for those men to hit those beaches, in the midst of all the firepower the Nazis had assembled on the coast.

    Too bad some people still don't get it.

    Thanks to service men and women, like yourself, people here are also free to act like jackazzes, as well as respectful Americans.


    Their parents probably act the same way. What can you do?

     

    [/QUOTE]

    thanks B's for your kind words. I thought the same thing you did. It's their parents fault, period. I ignored them. Instead I got the chance to shake the hands of two young marines that came in their dress uniforms newly returned from afgan. I said "Semper Fi" gentleman and welcome home. One was a young buck sgt and the other was a lance corporal. both about 24 or so.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from illinoisredsox. Show illinoisredsox's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

     

    69 years ago today, a bunch of very scared, seasick and incredibly brave men from America, Canada, England, and other Allied countries went ashore off the Normandy coast to assault Hitler's Fortress Europe ... we owe them much.

    We forget, too, that these guys weren't John Wayne; many were a year or 2 out of high school. They were kids, and many left their youth behind forever.

    I think it should be a prerequisite to graduate high school, get a drivers license, become a citizen or for anyone whining to just watch the first 15 minutes of "Saving Private Ryan". Can you just imagine the door dropping on those Higgins boats knowing what you where about to face. Those guys were the greatest generation for a reason.

    Most never talked about it. My Dad graduated high school a few days after D-Day and immediately entered the Navy. He was 17.  His older brother was among those who landed in Normandy that day and survived.  We never heard stories about the war until the final couple weeks of his life; Dad just wouldn't talk about it. Neither would my uncle.

    Several years ago, one of my sons had a school assignment to interview a grandparent. One of the questions was the old standard, what did you dream about doing after high school. My Dad's reply shocked us. He said he had no dreams. He went on to explain that he knew he would be going to war, and that he did not expect to come home, and that most of the boys in his high school had the same expectation. Can you imagine going through your teenage years with that in the back of your mind?

    As we lose more and more of them each year (the youngest are now in their late 80s), we have to remember them.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    In response to illinoisredsox's comment:

     

    69 years ago today, a bunch of very scared, seasick and incredibly brave men from America, Canada, England, and other Allied countries went ashore off the Normandy coast to assault Hitler's Fortress Europe ... we owe them much.

    We forget, too, that these guys weren't John Wayne; many were a year or 2 out of high school. They were kids, and many left their youth behind forever.

    I think it should be a prerequisite to graduate high school, get a drivers license, become a citizen or for anyone whining to just watch the first 15 minutes of "Saving Private Ryan". Can you just imagine the door dropping on those Higgins boats knowing what you where about to face. Those guys were the greatest generation for a reason.

    Most never talked about it. My Dad graduated high school a few days after D-Day and immediately entered the Navy. His older brother was among those who landed in Normandy that day and survived.  We never heard stories about the war until the final couple weeks of his life. He just wouldn't talk about it. Neither would my uncle.

    Several years ago, one of my sons had a school assignment to interview a grandparent. One of the questions was the old standard, what did you dream about doing after high school. His reply shocked us. He said he had no dreams. He went on to explain that he knew he would be going to war, and that he did not expect to come home, and that most of the boys in his high school had the same expectation. Can you imagine going through your teenage years with that in the back of your mind?

    As we lose more and more of them each year (the youngest are now in their late 80s), we have to remember them.



    Amen! My dad passed two years ago at age 87. he just turned 21 when he flew the D day mission as a right waist gunner on a B-24 Liberator stationed in England. He never spoke to me about his experiences until I came back from south east asia in 71. But you are right. not many of em left. I always make it a point to say hello to a WW2 vet when I come across them.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThefourBs. Show ThefourBs's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    In response to illinoisredsox's comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

     

    69 years ago today, a bunch of very scared, seasick and incredibly brave men from America, Canada, England, and other Allied countries went ashore off the Normandy coast to assault Hitler's Fortress Europe ... we owe them much.

    We forget, too, that these guys weren't John Wayne; many were a year or 2 out of high school. They were kids, and many left their youth behind forever.

    I think it should be a prerequisite to graduate high school, get a drivers license, become a citizen or for anyone whining to just watch the first 15 minutes of "Saving Private Ryan". Can you just imagine the door dropping on those Higgins boats knowing what you where about to face. Those guys were the greatest generation for a reason.

    Most never talked about it. My Dad graduated high school a few days after D-Day and immediately entered the Navy. His older brother was among those who landed in Normandy that day and survived.  We never heard stories about the war until the final couple weeks of his life. He just wouldn't talk about it. Neither would my uncle.

    Several years ago, one of my sons had a school assignment to interview a grandparent. One of the questions was the old standard, what did you dream about doing after high school. His reply shocked us. He said he had no dreams. He went on to explain that he knew he would be going to war, and that he did not expect to come home, and that most of the boys in his high school had the same expectation. Can you imagine going through your teenage years with that in the back of your mind?

    As we lose more and more of them each year (the youngest are now in their late 80s), we have to remember them.

     



    Amen! My dad passed two years ago at age 87. he just turned 21 when he flew the D day mission as a right waist gunner on a B-24 Liberator stationed in England. He never spoke to me about his experiences until I came back from south east asia in 71. But you are right. not many of em left. I always make it a point to say hello to a WW2 vet when I come across them.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    That's a duty not meant for the faint of heart, Hammah.

    Props to your dad and sorry for your loss.

     

    to illinoisredsox
    I've watched Saving Private Ryan once.

    Great movie, but I can't bring myself to watch it again.

    I agree. Everyone should see the first 15 min.

     
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  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Section136. Show Section136's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    Hard to believe ladies and gents that it was 69 years ago today that the greatest armarda ever assembled hit the beaches of france to eventually crush the axis powers and end the war in europe. There are not too many WW2 war veterans left as they are in their late eighties to mid nineties. As I stood at attention during the national anthem last night at my sons graduation I thought about today and the sacrifices that those hero's made and the generations that have followed since. Funny thing about last night. I watched about 5 youngsters that stayed seated with their buds in their ears during the anthem and my mrs knew my anger at seeing this and took my hand and squeezed it with total understanding.

    Freedom was never free. It was earned.....at incredible sacrifice.




    Thank you!

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from LloydDobler. Show LloydDobler's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    These men had a level of courage I can't even begin to imagine, let alone understand. As the boats approached that morning, each man knew there was a very good chance he would die on that beach. Several thousand did, paying the ultimate price to ensure our freedom. Paying our respect doesn't seem nearly enough, but it's all we can do. And certainly that means taking your damn ear buds out and  standing at attention during the anthem.  I'm not the greatest father in the world, but by God I have taught my two sons that.


    There are many excellent books on D-Day. The latest I read was called "The Bedford Boys," which is about 21 young men from a small town in Virginia (my home state) that died in the invasion. I highly recommend.


    Also, "Saving Private Ryan" probably shows the horror as well as any film could. I've heard veterans of D-Day say it captured "everything but the smell."

     

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    In response to LloydDobler's comment:

    These men had a level of courage I can't even begin to imagine, let alone understand. As the boats approached that morning, each man knew there was a very good chance he would die on that beach. Several thousand did, paying the ultimate price to ensure our freedom. Paying our respect doesn't seem nearly enough, but it's all we can do. And certainly that means taking your damn ear buds out and  standing at attention during the anthem.  I'm not the greatest father in the world, but by God I have taught my two sons that.


    There are many excellent books on D-Day. The latest I read was called "The Bedford Boys," which is about 21 young men from a small town in Virginia (my home state) that died in the invasion. I highly recommend.


    Also, "Saving Private Ryan" probably shows the horror as well as any film could. I've heard veterans of D-Day say it captured "everything but the smell."

     


    a great post Loyd much appreciated. I agree about saving private ryan 100%. what a job that speilberg did with that film. so surreal was the scene when the aging ryan spoke to the headstone about bringing his wife and family. when he stood back and saluted I totally lost it man. when he asked his wife to tell him that he was a good man and that he had a good life wrecked me emotionally. He had indeed "earned it" as his capt wispered to him with his dying breaths. The other movie that hit me hard was made in 1961 and was called "The Longest Day" and it was shot in black and white. and remember that this was well before CGI. a really great film with an extrodinary cast.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from SFBostonFan. Show SFBostonFan's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    I posted this on Memorial Day & find it a great copy and paste here in case a patriot missed it !!!

    Before or after you visit the beaches, cemetery, military sites etc. in Normandy, you must see Le Mont Saint Michele, the Gothic style Benedictine Abbey dedicated to the Archangel Saint Michael is France's # 1 tourist attraction. The Piano Bar in the hotel has a lot of WW2 memorabilia. A still vivid  memory is the Gold Statue of the Archangel Saint Michael on the tallest spire.  Hitler told his commanding General to destroy the Abbey but, fortunately, he was sane & disobeyed this order !

    I have seen many Military sites in the world, our own Gettysburg,  Bastogne, Anzio, Waterloo etc. etc. but none has left me with more of an awe inspiring sensation than to see on about 175 acres the American cemetery on a plateau facing Omaha Beach with as far as the eye can see whites crosses & Stars of David. It was chilling !  Make sure you see the Museum “6 June 1944 D Day” with uniforms, weapons, films etc. One of Normandy’s beaches is called “Arromanches” where an artificial port was created so that 1000s of Allied Forces with heavy equipment could come ashore. Visible still are the remains of the floating harbor. You’ll see Nazi bunkers all over but most impressive is “Point du Hoc” as shown in the above post where 3 companies of the 2nd Ranger Battalion climbed 100 feet up a vertical cliff with barbed wire at the top & grenades being tossed down on them.  I, couldn’t make this climb with nobody above trying to kill me and I say, Hoorah, to one of the poster's Army Ranger friend who climbed this cliff on June 6.

    It was interesting as we walked around that there was a German tour & I recall the French guide saying that many local innocent French citizens were killed that day in the bombing and it was like she was very angry about it.  I mean we had the Nazis believing our main attack was to be at Calais but we had to tell the locals to get out of their houses. Yup, of course, there would have been no sympathizers allerting the Germans to this. To me, this was an acceptable casualty of war.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from SFBostonFan. Show SFBostonFan's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or reserve- is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to 'The citizens of the United States of America ' for an amount of 'up to and including his life'.
                                                       

     
     
    Rest easy, sleep well my brothers.
    Know the line has held, your job is done.
    Rest easy, sleep well.
    Others have taken up where you fell, the line has held.
    Peace, peace, and farewell...

    Arlington Cemetery

    You New England fans may be interested to know that these wreaths -- some 5,000 -- are donated by the Worcester Wreath Co. of Harrington, Maine. The owner, Merrill Worcester, not only provides the wreaths, but covers the trucking expense as well. He's done this since 1992. A wonderful guy. Also, most years, groups of Maine school kids combine an educational trip to DC with this event to help out. Making this even more remarkable is the fact that Harrington is in one the poorest parts of the state.

    You hear too much about the bad things people do. Everyone should hear about this.

     

     

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThefourBs. Show ThefourBs's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    In response to SFBostonFan's comment:

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or reserve- is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to 'The citizens of the United States of America ' for an amount of 'up to and including my life'.
                                                       
     
     
    Rest easy, sleep well my brothers.
    Know the line has held, your job is done.
    Rest easy, sleep well.
    Others have taken up where you fell, the line has held.
    Peace, peace, and farewell...

    =================================================================================================

    Arlington Guard at the "Tomb of the Unknown Soldier"

     

     

    You New England fans may be interested to know that these wreaths -- some 5,000 -- are donated by the Worcester Wreath Co. of Harrington, Maine. The owner, Merrill Worcester, not only provides the wreaths, but covers the trucking expense as well. He's done this since 1992. A wonderful guy. Also, most years, groups of Maine school kids combine an educational trip to DC with this event to help out. Making this even more remarkable is the fact that Harrington is in one the poorest parts of the state.

    You hear too much about the bad things people do. Everyone should hear about this.

     

     




    Very cool, SF.

    You're right.

    Things like this aren't publicized nearly enough.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from JimfromFlorida. Show JimfromFlorida's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    See a person in uniform or with a military het etc.. and always say thank you. Will also pay for whatever meal/snack they are buying.

     

    THANK YOU ALL

    Love the Red Sox and enjoy the ride every year.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from slasher9. Show slasher9's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    awesome thread.  thanks to all those that stormed the beach or fell from the sky.

    "Cat-F, Cat-F - dog one is OPEN!"

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    In response to SFBostonFan's comment:

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or reserve- is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to 'The citizens of the United States of America ' for an amount of 'up to and including his life'.
                                                       

     
     
    Rest easy, sleep well my brothers.
    Know the line has held, your job is done.
    Rest easy, sleep well.
    Others have taken up where you fell, the line has held.
    Peace, peace, and farewell...

    Arlington Cemetery

    You New England fans may be interested to know that these wreaths -- some 5,000 -- are donated by the Worcester Wreath Co. of Harrington, Maine. The owner, Merrill Worcester, not only provides the wreaths, but covers the trucking expense as well. He's done this since 1992. A wonderful guy. Also, most years, groups of Maine school kids combine an educational trip to DC with this event to help out. Making this even more remarkable is the fact that Harrington is in one the poorest parts of the state.

    You hear too much about the bad things people do. Everyone should hear about this.

     

     



    +100

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from isurfvb24. Show isurfvb24's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    my grandfather was on the midway, my father served for 30 years in the navy, two of my uncles served in the army and the navy, and i served in the air force. 

    A veteran, weather active duty, dishcarged, retired, or reserve, is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to the united states of america, for an amount up to and including his life. that is an honor, and there are way too many people in this country today, who no longer understand that fact.

    if you see or know a veteran, shake his hand, and tell him thanks. they deserve it.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from 67redsox. Show 67redsox's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    In response to SFBostonFan's comment:

    A veteran - whether active duty, retired, or reserve- is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to 'The citizens of the United States of America ' for an amount of 'up to and including his life'.
                                                       

     
     
    Rest easy, sleep well my brothers.
    Know the line has held, your job is done.
    Rest easy, sleep well.
    Others have taken up where you fell, the line has held.
    Peace, peace, and farewell...

    Arlington Cemetery

    You New England fans may be interested to know that these wreaths -- some 5,000 -- are donated by the Worcester Wreath Co. of Harrington, Maine. The owner, Merrill Worcester, not only provides the wreaths, but covers the trucking expense as well. He's done this since 1992. A wonderful guy. Also, most years, groups of Maine school kids combine an educational trip to DC with this event to help out. Making this even more remarkable is the fact that Harrington is in one the poorest parts of the state.

    You hear too much about the bad things people do. Everyone should hear about this.

     

     




    Thanks for sharing!

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from 67redsox. Show 67redsox's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

     

    Hard to believe ladies and gents that it was 69 years ago today that the greatest armarda ever assembled hit the beaches of france to eventually crush the axis powers and end the war in europe. There are not too many WW2 war veterans left as they are in their late eighties to mid nineties. As I stood at attention during the national anthem last night at my sons graduation I thought about today and the sacrifices that those hero's made and the generations that have followed since. Funny thing about last night. I watched about 5 youngsters that stayed seated with their buds in their ears during the anthem and my mrs knew my anger at seeing this and took my hand and squeezed it with total understanding.

    Freedom was never free. It was earned.....at incredible sacrifice.

     



    Thanks for starting this and other threads that honor those who serve.  As I said before my father served in the south pacific in WWll.  He was not at Dday but he was at some other major battles.  He road in those boats more than once, I don't know how he did it.

     

    Living outside of dc we go into the city now and then.  We took the train into dc during the time the WWll memorial was being dedicated.  I had the honor of witnessing many vets on the train with their families.

    Since my dad died when he was 67 I didn't have the honor of sharing the day with him so I asked one vet to remember him during the ceremony.  I gave the man my dad's name, it felt good that in some small way my dad would be there.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from RSF4Life234. Show RSF4Life234's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    Both of my grand parents surved on dday, I thank those for thier service, and hope that younger generations are spared from the horrors of war.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    GREAT THREAD; although not as realistic due to when it was made, The Longest Day is another notable D Day Film

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from georom4. Show georom4's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    and the dirty little secret was that these first wave soldiers were rookies who were expected to be blasted and establish a beachhead for the more experienced troops on DDay +1,2....the reality was that except for some of the American zones, resistance was limited....

    As always - 100% correct!

     
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from TheExaminer. Show TheExaminer's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    I need to read some more books about that. I still dont understand how those guys were able to get off those boats while being sprayed in the face with direct machine gun fire, wade ashore, establish a beach head, then take the pillbox covered heights above the beach. Amazing. Hard to imagine any assault with more bravery than that since the Civil War.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThatWasMe. Show ThatWasMe's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    In response to TheExaminer's comment:

     

    I need to read some more books about that. I still dont understand how those guys were able to get off those boats while being sprayed in the face with direct machine gun fire, wade ashore, establish a beach head, then take the pillbox covered heights above the beach. Amazing. Hard to imagine any assault with more bravery than that since the Civil War.

     




     

    Muttley,

    D-Day by Stephen Ambrose the best I know of. He also wrote "Band of Brothers".

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from 67redsox. Show 67redsox's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944 D Day Honor Thread.

    In response to TheExaminer's comment:

    I need to read some more books about that. I still dont understand how those guys were able to get off those boats while being sprayed in the face with direct machine gun fire, wade ashore, establish a beach head, then take the pillbox covered heights above the beach. Amazing. Hard to imagine any assault with more bravery than that since the Civil War.




    I don't understand either.  When I asked my dad questions about the war he never made it seem that bad.  Maybe he was just trying to protect me from the horrors or maybe he figured he just did what was expected of him.  Boggels the mind.

     
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