June the 6th 1944

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from S5. Show S5's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:
    [QUOTE]


    WHAT HAPPENED TO MY THREAD?

    [/QUOTE]

    I don't know what happened.  It was gone for a minute, then it was back.  The good news is that it's back.  

    Having the right to do something doesn't make it the right thing to do.

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from RigatoniT. Show RigatoniT's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    Rather than deal with one individual they would rather erase an entire OP that represents what the rest of us "should" already be thinking.

    It is the new America.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from SFBostonFan. Show SFBostonFan's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Hard to believe that it is 70 years ago today that the greatest armada ever gathered at one time hit the beaches of Normandy to start what was the beginning of the end to the war in Europe. Some of those guys were only 18 years old. My dad's bomb group had a mission that day. To all those WW2 veterans I send out my gratitude and deepest respect for what they endured that day. May God bless them all.

     

    [/QUOTE]
    =============================================================

    There are many estimates of casualties of 5000 dead and 10000-15000 wounded Allied troops at Normandy.   I would like to mention that at Okinawa there were 14000 dead and 65000 casualties and Iwo Jima 6800 dead and 26000 casualties, of course these campaigns were one to 2 months long, most were Marines. 

     

    I saw at the Museum “6 June 1944 D Day” uniforms, weapons, films etc. One of Normandy’s beaches is called “Arromanches” where an artificial port was created so that 1000s of Allied Forces with heavy equipment could come ashore. Visible today still are the remains of the floating harbor. If anyone goes, you’ll see Nazi bunkers all over but most impressive is “Point du Hoc” where 3 companies of the 2nd Ranger Battalion climbed 100 feet up a vertical cliff with barbed wire at the top & grenades being tossed down on them. I, couldn’t make this climb with nobody above trying to kill me.

    I have seen many Military sites in the world, our own Gettysburg, Bastogne, Anzio, Waterloo etc. etc. but none has left me with more of an awe inspiring sensation than to see on about 175 acres the American cemetery on a plateau facing Omaha Beach with as far as the eye can see whites crosses & Stars of David. It was chilling !

    It was interesting as we walked around that there was a German tour & I recall the French guide saying that many local innocent French citizens were killed that day in the bombing and it was like she was very angry about it. I mean we had the Nazis believing our main attack was to be at Calais but we had to tell the locals to get out of their houses. Yup, of course, there would have been no sympathizers alerting the Germans to this. To me, this was an acceptable casualty of war.

    I got goosebumps reading this:

    "THE FINAL INSPECTION"

    The Soldier stood and faced God,
    Which must always come to pass.
    He hoped his shoes were shining,
    Just as brightly as his brass.

    'Step forward now, Soldier,
    How shall I deal with you?
    Have you always turned the other cheek?
    To My Church have you been true?'

    The soldier squared his shoulders and said,
    'no, Lord, I guess I ain't.
    Because those of us who carry guns,
    Can't always be a saint.

    I've had to work most Sundays,
    And at times my talk was tough.
    And sometimes I've been violent,
    Because the world is awfully rough.

    But, I never took a penny,
    That wasn't mine to keep.
    Though I worked a lot of overtime,
    When the bills just got too steep.

    And I never passed a cry for help,
    Though at times I shook with fear.
    And sometimes, God, forgive me,
    I've wept unmanly tears.

    I know I don't deserve a place,
    Among the people here.
    They never wanted me around,
    Except to calm their fears.

    If you've a place for me here, Lord,
    It needn't be so grand.
    I never expected or had too much,
    But if you don't, I'll understand.

    There was a silence all around the throne,
    Where the saints had often trod.
    As the Soldier waited quietly,
    For the judgment of his God.

    'Step forward now, you Soldier,
    You've borne your burdens well.
    Walk peacefully on Heaven's streets,
    You've done your time in Hell.'

    ~Author Unknown~

     

    It's the Soldier, not the reporter
    Who has given us the freedom of the press.

    It's the Soldier, not the poet,
    Who has given us the freedom of speech.

    It's the Soldier, not the politicians that ensures
    Our right to Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness.

    It's the Soldier who salutes the flag,
    Who serves beneath the flag,
    And whose coffin is draped by the flag.

     

     

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to illinoisredsox's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I think it should be a prerequisite to graduate high school, get a drivers license, become a citizen or for anyone whining to just watch the first 15 minutes of "Saving Private Ryan". Can you just imagine the door dropping on those Higgins boats knowing what you where about to face. Those guys were the greatest generation for a reason.

     

     

     

    We forget, too, that these guys weren't John Wayne; a lot of them were 19-21 years old, my sons' ages. They were kids, although they left their youth behind forever.

     

     

     

    Most never talked about it. My Dad graduated high school a few days after D-Day  and immediately entered the Navy. His older brother was among those who landed in Normandy that day and survived. We never heard stories about the war until the final couple weeks of his life. Dad just wouldn't talk about it. Neither would my uncle.

     

     

     

    Several years ago, one of my sons had a school assignment to interview a grandparent. One of the questions was the old standard, what did you dream about doing after high school. His reply shocked us. He said he had no dreams. He went on to explain that he knew he would be going to war, and that he did not expect to come home, and that most of the boys in his high school had the same expectation. Can you imagine going through your teenage years with that in the back of your mind?

     

     

     

    As we lose more and more of them each year (the youngest are nearly 90 years old), we have to remember them.

    [/QUOTE]

    thanks for the great reply to my thread. I can totally relate. I graduated high school in 1967. I knew I wasn't going to college. I had done what most of my classmates did and that was to get classified with selective service. I was instantly classified 1A. I had a long conversation with my dad and I told him I didn't want to be drafted. So, I enlisted and did 4 years in the U.S.Army. All that said, I remember thinking the same thing about dreams. at the time I didn't have any either.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to SFBostonFan's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Hard to believe that it is 70 years ago today that the greatest armada ever gathered at one time hit the beaches of Normandy to start what was the beginning of the end to the war in Europe. Some of those guys were only 18 years old. My dad's bomb group had a mission that day. To all those WW2 veterans I send out my gratitude and deepest respect for what they endured that day. May God bless them all.

     

    [/QUOTE]
    =============================================================

    There are many estimates of casualties of 5000 dead and 10000-15000 wounded Allied troops at Normandy.   I would like to mention that at Okinawa there were 14000 dead and 65000 casualties and Iwo Jima 6800 dead and 26000 casualties, of course these campaigns were one to 2 months long, most were Marines. 

     

    I saw at the Museum “6 June 1944 D Day” uniforms, weapons, films etc. One of Normandy’s beaches is called “Arromanches” where an artificial port was created so that 1000s of Allied Forces with heavy equipment could come ashore. Visible today still are the remains of the floating harbor. If anyone goes, you’ll see Nazi bunkers all over but most impressive is “Point du Hoc” where 3 companies of the 2nd Ranger Battalion climbed 100 feet up a vertical cliff with barbed wire at the top & grenades being tossed down on them. I, couldn’t make this climb with nobody above trying to kill me.

    I have seen many Military sites in the world, our own Gettysburg, Bastogne, Anzio, Waterloo etc. etc. but none has left me with more of an awe inspiring sensation than to see on about 175 acres the American cemetery on a plateau facing Omaha Beach with as far as the eye can see whites crosses & Stars of David. It was chilling !

    It was interesting as we walked around that there was a German tour & I recall the French guide saying that many local innocent French citizens were killed that day in the bombing and it was like she was very angry about it. I mean we had the Nazis believing our main attack was to be at Calais but we had to tell the locals to get out of their houses. Yup, of course, there would have been no sympathizers alerting the Germans to this. To me, this was an acceptable casualty of war.

    I got goosebumps reading this:

    "THE FINAL INSPECTION"

    The Soldier stood and faced God,
    Which must always come to pass.
    He hoped his shoes were shining,
    Just as brightly as his brass.

    'Step forward now, Soldier,
    How shall I deal with you?
    Have you always turned the other cheek?
    To My Church have you been true?'

    The soldier squared his shoulders and said,
    'no, Lord, I guess I ain't.
    Because those of us who carry guns,
    Can't always be a saint.

    I've had to work most Sundays,
    And at times my talk was tough.
    And sometimes I've been violent,
    Because the world is awfully rough.

    But, I never took a penny,
    That wasn't mine to keep.
    Though I worked a lot of overtime,
    When the bills just got too steep.

    And I never passed a cry for help,
    Though at times I shook with fear.
    And sometimes, God, forgive me,
    I've wept unmanly tears.

    I know I don't deserve a place,
    Among the people here.
    They never wanted me around,
    Except to calm their fears.

    If you've a place for me here, Lord,
    It needn't be so grand.
    I never expected or had too much,
    But if you don't, I'll understand.

    There was a silence all around the throne,
    Where the saints had often trod.
    As the Soldier waited quietly,
    For the judgment of his God.

    'Step forward now, you Soldier,
    You've borne your burdens well.
    Walk peacefully on Heaven's streets,
    You've done your time in Hell.'

    ~Author Unknown~

     

    It's the Soldier, not the reporter
    Who has given us the freedom of the press.

    It's the Soldier, not the poet,
    Who has given us the freedom of speech.

    It's the Soldier, not the politicians that ensures
    Our right to Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness.

    It's the Soldier who salutes the flag,
    Who serves beneath the flag,
    And whose coffin is draped by the flag.

     

     

     

    [/QUOTE]
    +1,000,000

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Endspeed. Show Endspeed's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    Thank you to all the brave GI's who faced Rommel's Atlantic Wall and gained a foothold in Europe for the Allies.  I have stood at the cemetery at St. Laurent-Sur-Mer and I have been filled with awe at the scope of all those people laying down their lives for our freedom and survival.  The average age of a D-day casualty was 19 years old! The first wave was destroyed. The second was decimated and yet the GI's kept coming. The third wave survived because the first and second waves had forced the Germans to expend all their ammo to stop them. What courage! To all enjoying the fruits of these heroes' sacrifice, pay them back by earning the gifts of freedom and survival they have bestowed upon us. 

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bill-806. Show Bill-806's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to illinoisredsox's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I think it should be a prerequisite to graduate high school, get a drivers license, become a citizen or for anyone whining to just watch the first 15 minutes of "Saving Private Ryan". Can you just imagine the door dropping on those Higgins boats knowing what you where about to face. Those guys were the greatest generation for a reason.

     

     

     

    We forget, too, that these guys weren't John Wayne; a lot of them were 19-21 years old, my sons' ages. They were kids, although they left their youth behind forever.

     

     

     

    Most never talked about it. My Dad graduated high school a few days after D-Day  and immediately entered the Navy. His older brother was among those who landed in Normandy that day and survived. We never heard stories about the war until the final couple weeks of his life. Dad just wouldn't talk about it. Neither would my uncle.

     

     

     

    Several years ago, one of my sons had a school assignment to interview a grandparent. One of the questions was the old standard, what did you dream about doing after high school. His reply shocked us. He said he had no dreams. He went on to explain that he knew he would be going to war, and that he did not expect to come home, and that most of the boys in his high school had the same expectation. Can you imagine going through your teenage years with that in the back of your mind?

     

     

     

    As we lose more and more of them each year (the youngest are nearly 90 years old), we have to remember them.

    [/QUOTE]

    thanks for the great reply to my thread. I can totally relate. I graduated high school in 1967. I knew I wasn't going to college. I had done what most of my classmates did and that was to get classified with selective service. I was instantly classified 1A. I had a long conversation with my dad and I told him I didn't want to be drafted. So, I enlisted and did 4 years in the U.S.Army. All that said, I remember thinking the same thing about dreams. at the time I didn't have any either.

    [/QUOTE]Great THREAD HAMMAH ...........   Our  (you/I )  paths are/were quite similar as we took the same road......  A lot (not all) knew within a year or two of H S graduation that this would be our generations natural move.  What we didn't know is that the "HAPPY DAYS OF the 1960's" would turn very dark by the time we aged into the 1970's.......  That said, knowing what we know now, I would do the same again .......  I think that you would too !!!!


     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to Bill-806's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to illinoisredsox's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I think it should be a prerequisite to graduate high school, get a drivers license, become a citizen or for anyone whining to just watch the first 15 minutes of "Saving Private Ryan". Can you just imagine the door dropping on those Higgins boats knowing what you where about to face. Those guys were the greatest generation for a reason.

     

     

     

    We forget, too, that these guys weren't John Wayne; a lot of them were 19-21 years old, my sons' ages. They were kids, although they left their youth behind forever.

     

     

     

    Most never talked about it. My Dad graduated high school a few days after D-Day  and immediately entered the Navy. His older brother was among those who landed in Normandy that day and survived. We never heard stories about the war until the final couple weeks of his life. Dad just wouldn't talk about it. Neither would my uncle.

     

     

     

    Several years ago, one of my sons had a school assignment to interview a grandparent. One of the questions was the old standard, what did you dream about doing after high school. His reply shocked us. He said he had no dreams. He went on to explain that he knew he would be going to war, and that he did not expect to come home, and that most of the boys in his high school had the same expectation. Can you imagine going through your teenage years with that in the back of your mind?

     

     

     

    As we lose more and more of them each year (the youngest are nearly 90 years old), we have to remember them.

    [/QUOTE]

    thanks for the great reply to my thread. I can totally relate. I graduated high school in 1967. I knew I wasn't going to college. I had done what most of my classmates did and that was to get classified with selective service. I was instantly classified 1A. I had a long conversation with my dad and I told him I didn't want to be drafted. So, I enlisted and did 4 years in the U.S.Army. All that said, I remember thinking the same thing about dreams. at the time I didn't have any either.

    [/QUOTE]Great THREAD HAMMAH ...........   Our  (you/I )  paths are/were quite similar as we took the same road......  A lot (not all) knew within a year or two of H S graduation that this would be our generations natural move.  What we didn't know is that the "HAPPY DAYS OF the 1960's" would turn very dark by the time we aged into the 1970's.......  That said, knowing what we know now, I would do the same again .......  I think that you would too !!!!


    [/QUOTE]

    In a "New York" minute Bill.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from SFBostonFan. Show SFBostonFan's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to illinoisredsox's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I think it should be a prerequisite to graduate high school, get a drivers license, become a citizen or for anyone whining to just watch the first 15 minutes of "Saving Private Ryan". Can you just imagine the door dropping on those Higgins boats knowing what you where about to face. Those guys were the greatest generation for a reason.

     

     

     

    We forget, too, that these guys weren't John Wayne; a lot of them were 19-21 years old, my sons' ages. They were kids, although they left their youth behind forever.

     

     

     

    Most never talked about it. My Dad graduated high school a few days after D-Day  and immediately entered the Navy. His older brother was among those who landed in Normandy that day and survived. We never heard stories about the war until the final couple weeks of his life. Dad just wouldn't talk about it. Neither would my uncle.

     

     

     

    Several years ago, one of my sons had a school assignment to interview a grandparent. One of the questions was the old standard, what did you dream about doing after high school. His reply shocked us. He said he had no dreams. He went on to explain that he knew he would be going to war, and that he did not expect to come home, and that most of the boys in his high school had the same expectation. Can you imagine going through your teenage years with that in the back of your mind?

     

     

     

    As we lose more and more of them each year (the youngest are nearly 90 years old), we have to remember them.

    [/QUOTE]

    thanks for the great reply to my thread. I can totally relate. I graduated high school in 1967. I knew I wasn't going to college. I had done what most of my classmates did and that was to get classified with selective service. I was instantly classified 1A. I had a long conversation with my dad and I told him I didn't want to be drafted. So, I enlisted and did 4 years in the U.S.Army. All that said, I remember thinking the same thing about dreams. at the time I didn't have any either.

    [/QUOTE]


    Hammah...I am forgetting my New Englandese being in California almost 50 years. Is your name really HAMMER ? HA! LOL.

    I was never "gung ho" ala John Wayne movies and wanted to go to Viet Nam but as I was privileged to be born and live in the land of the free because of sacrifices of soldiers before me, whether I agree with our political leaders or not and their reason for us being in Asia, there was a draft and unless you were 4F, went to Canada or stayed in school, you were classified as 1A and subject to the draft. I feel that all our troops regardless of the campaign, Korea, Viet Nam, Iraq, Afghanistan etc. are heroes. A bullet in any of these wars can kill as one in WW2. But, I have been reading about D-Day in awe. A German machine gunner said he was getting sick to his stomach killing so many sitting duck Americans. Another German said he was so happy he was captured & didn't have to go to the Eastern front. You mention a Higgins boat and I read that there were 30 troops who had their bellies full from breakfast and they heard machine gun bullets bouncing off the ramp & one soldier was told to drop the ramp and made believe he didn't hear the order until the 3rd time when it was drop the F---ing ramp. In the Marines up until the Middle East wars all our training was amphibious landings so I have been on these boats and when one vomits, all do so at Normandy many were anxious to get off even over their heads with full packs so many drowned. This one soldier said many arrived on the beach wounded and only 3 out of his 30 made it to the beach in one piece. In short, in any war when you are being shot at and you survive, you are a hero. I have been around wounded men and many do not say "Oh God" but "Mama, Mama".

    Our Boston Sports team athletes are our heroes but also OUR TROOPS ARE OUR HEROES TOO !!!

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from PatsLifer. Show PatsLifer's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to slasher9's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Bill-806's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Hard to believe that it is 70 years ago today that the greatest armada ever gathered at one time hit the beaches of Normandy to start what was the beginning of the end to the war in Europe. Some of those guys were only 18 years old. My dad's bomb group had a mission that day. To all those WW2 veterans I send out my gratitude and deepest respect for what they endured that day. May God bless them all.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]YES HAMMAH, TODAY IS A SPECIAL DAY....... AS THE "BIG O" WAS SPEAKING THIS MORNING I COULDN'T HELP BUT WONDER WHAT OUR  WWII VETS WOULD BE THINKING ABOUT THIS  C I C AND HIS MANY CURIOUS ACTIONS OVER THE LAST 6 YEARS !!!


    [/QUOTE]


    what actions are you referring to?

    starting 2 senseless wars that have sent more American boys home in body bags than were sent home on 06-Jun-1944.  oh wait, that was the previous guy.

    not to mention all the kids coming home without limbs.

    thankfully in the last 6 years - we have ended 1 of those wars and are about to signoff of the other.

    so please, tell me why our armed forces should be mad at commander in chief.  you know, the one that didn't look under his leather sofa in the oval office for WMD....i'm talking about the one that hunted down and authorized the kill of taliban leader.

    [/QUOTE]

    Lol. Keep living the dream. Hope and change! 

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to SFBostonFan's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to illinoisredsox's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I think it should be a prerequisite to graduate high school, get a drivers license, become a citizen or for anyone whining to just watch the first 15 minutes of "Saving Private Ryan". Can you just imagine the door dropping on those Higgins boats knowing what you where about to face. Those guys were the greatest generation for a reason.

     

     

     

    We forget, too, that these guys weren't John Wayne; a lot of them were 19-21 years old, my sons' ages. They were kids, although they left their youth behind forever.

     

     

     

    Most never talked about it. My Dad graduated high school a few days after D-Day  and immediately entered the Navy. His older brother was among those who landed in Normandy that day and survived. We never heard stories about the war until the final couple weeks of his life. Dad just wouldn't talk about it. Neither would my uncle.

     

     

     

    Several years ago, one of my sons had a school assignment to interview a grandparent. One of the questions was the old standard, what did you dream about doing after high school. His reply shocked us. He said he had no dreams. He went on to explain that he knew he would be going to war, and that he did not expect to come home, and that most of the boys in his high school had the same expectation. Can you imagine going through your teenage years with that in the back of your mind?

     

     

     

    As we lose more and more of them each year (the youngest are nearly 90 years old), we have to remember them.

    [/QUOTE]

    thanks for the great reply to my thread. I can totally relate. I graduated high school in 1967. I knew I wasn't going to college. I had done what most of my classmates did and that was to get classified with selective service. I was instantly classified 1A. I had a long conversation with my dad and I told him I didn't want to be drafted. So, I enlisted and did 4 years in the U.S.Army. All that said, I remember thinking the same thing about dreams. at the time I didn't have any either.

    [/QUOTE]


    Hammah...I am forgetting my New Englandese being in California almost 50 years. Is your name really HAMMER ? HA! LOL.

    I was never "gung ho" ala John Wayne movies and wanted to go to Viet Nam but as I was privileged to be born and live in the land of the free because of sacrifices of soldiers before me, whether I agree with our political leaders or not and their reason for us being in Asia, there was a draft and unless you were 4F, went to Canada or stayed in school, you were classified as 1A and subject to the draft. I feel that all our troops regardless of the campaign, Korea, Viet Nam, Iraq, Afghanistan etc. are heroes. A bullet in any of these wars can kill as one in WW2. But, I have been reading about D-Day in awe. A German machine gunner said he was getting sick to his stomach killing so many sitting duck Americans. Another German said he was so happy he was captured & didn't have to go to the Eastern front. You mention a Higgins boat and I read that there were 30 troops who had their bellies full from breakfast and they heard machine gun bullets bouncing off the ramp & one soldier was told to drop the ramp and made believe he didn't hear the order until the 3rd time when it was drop the F---ing ramp. In the Marines up until the Middle East wars all our training was amphibious landings so I have been on these boats and when one vomits, all do so at Normandy many were anxious to get off even over their heads with full packs so many drowned. This one soldier said many arrived on the beach wounded and only 3 out of his 30 made it to the beach in one piece. In short, in any war when you are being shot at and you survive, you are a hero. I have been around wounded men and many do not say "Oh God" but "Mama, Mama".

    Our Boston Sports team athletes are our heroes but also OUR TROOPS ARE OUR HEROES TOO !!!

    [/QUOTE]
    Yeah bulldog! Hammah is just my nickname with a boston accent. It's Hammer. too long of a story how I got it.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from J-BAY. Show J-BAY's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    Sweet salute: Video captures airline gate agent singing national anthem to WWII vets


    http://www.today.com/news/sweet-salute-video-captures-airline-gate-agent-singing-national-anthem-2D79756425




    A group of World War II veterans got a sweet surprise this week, when a gate agent at the Detroit airport serenaded them with a beautiful rendition of the national anthem over the loudspeaker.


    The moving moment came on Monday, when the agent at DTW, Anna Marie Barile, started to sing over the PA system for passengers waiting for Delta flight 98 from Detroit to Paris.



    The tribute, which the airline told TODAY.com was part of a larger send-off ceremony for a group of WWII veterans, came about at the urging of Barile's fellow employees, who encouraged her to sing since many of them had heard her voice before.


    There were 12 WWII veterans on this particular flight, which was headed to Paris, and at least one of them was en route to an event at Omaha Beach to recognize the 70th anniversary of D-Day. When it was announced over the PA system that he was a WWII veteran, he received a standing ovation from all the travelers.


     
    The moment was particularly touching for traveler Alyssa Vermeulen, who was heading to Italy (via Paris) for her honeymoon. She says she had just come back to the gate from the bathroom when she noticed a large crowed was gathered.


    "I was worried that something had happened, but when I asked my husband, he said that we had several WWII veterans on the plane," she told TODAY.com via email. "Shortly after, the flag appeared out of the gate and everyone stood for the national anthem."


    Vermeulen captured the moment on video, which she posted to YouTube, and said the experience was a nice contrast to what typically goes on in an airport.


    "It was a lovely display of patriotism in such a crazy place," she said. "Usually, airports are a high stress environment where people are rushing to connections, frantically gathering items, or anxiously waiting (for) their zone call to board, but for a few minutes everyone in the airport was standing, quiet and peaceful, showing respect to those who fought for our freedom."



    And the heartwarming spirit didn't end there. "The respect continued on the plane," Vermeulen said, when "everyone stopped to thank these men for (their) service." The pilot thanked the veterans by name, she said, and informed the cabin as the plane passed over Normandy.


    "One of the veterans also celebrated his 95th birthday on the plane and everyone sang to him before we deplaned," she said.



    The experience struck a personal note for Vermeulen, who has several veterans in her family, including her grandfather who served as a marine in WWII.


    "It truly was beautiful," she said, "and it made the long plane ride, that would usually be filled with complaints of small bathrooms and uncomfortable seats that would usually be filled with complaints of small bathrooms and uncomfortable seats take on a whole new meaning of gratitude for what we are so lucky to have

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from 67redsox. Show 67redsox's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to PatsLifer's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to slasher9's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Bill-806's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Hard to believe that it is 70 years ago today that the greatest armada ever gathered at one time hit the beaches of Normandy to start what was the beginning of the end to the war in Europe. Some of those guys were only 18 years old. My dad's bomb group had a mission that day. To all those WW2 veterans I send out my gratitude and deepest respect for what they endured that day. May God bless them all.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]YES HAMMAH, TODAY IS A SPECIAL DAY....... AS THE "BIG O" WAS SPEAKING THIS MORNING I COULDN'T HELP BUT WONDER WHAT OUR  WWII VETS WOULD BE THINKING ABOUT THIS  C I C AND HIS MANY CURIOUS ACTIONS OVER THE LAST 6 YEARS !!!


    [/QUOTE]


    what actions are you referring to?

    starting 2 senseless wars that have sent more American boys home in body bags than were sent home on 06-Jun-1944.  oh wait, that was the previous guy.

    not to mention all the kids coming home without limbs.

    thankfully in the last 6 years - we have ended 1 of those wars and are about to signoff of the other.

    so please, tell me why our armed forces should be mad at commander in chief.  you know, the one that didn't look under his leather sofa in the oval office for WMD....i'm talking about the one that hunted down and authorized the kill of taliban leader.

    [/QUOTE]

    Lol. Keep living the dream. Hope and change! 

    [/QUOTE]

    Good one!














     

     

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from 67redsox. Show 67redsox's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to J-BAY's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Sweet salute: Video captures airline gate agent singing national anthem to WWII vets

     

    http://www.today.com/news/sweet-salute-video-captures-airline-gate-agent-singing-national-anthem-2D79756425" rel="nofollow">http://www.today.com/news/sweet-salute-video-captures-airline-gate-agent-singing-national-anthem-2D79756425

     



    A group of World War II veterans got a sweet surprise this week, when a gate agent at the Detroit airport serenaded them with a beautiful rendition of the national anthem over the loudspeaker.

     

    The moving moment came on Monday, when the agent at DTW, Anna Marie Barile, started to sing over the PA system for passengers waiting for Delta flight 98 from Detroit to Paris.

     


    The tribute, which the airline told TODAY.com was part of a larger send-off ceremony for a group of WWII veterans, came about at the urging of Barile's fellow employees, who encouraged her to sing since many of them had heard her voice before.

     

    There were 12 WWII veterans on this particular flight, which was headed to Paris, and at least one of them was en route to an event at Omaha Beach to recognize the 70th anniversary of D-Day. When it was announced over the PA system that he was a WWII veteran, he received a standing ovation from all the travelers.

     

     
    The moment was particularly touching for traveler Alyssa Vermeulen, who was heading to Italy (via Paris) for her honeymoon. She says she had just come back to the gate from the bathroom when she noticed a large crowed was gathered.

     

    "I was worried that something had happened, but when I asked my husband, he said that we had several WWII veterans on the plane," she told TODAY.com via email. "Shortly after, the flag appeared out of the gate and everyone stood for the national anthem."

     

    Vermeulen captured the moment on video, which she posted to YouTube, and said the experience was a nice contrast to what typically goes on in an airport.

     

    "It was a lovely display of patriotism in such a crazy place," she said. "Usually, airports are a high stress environment where people are rushing to connections, frantically gathering items, or anxiously waiting (for) their zone call to board, but for a few minutes everyone in the airport was standing, quiet and peaceful, showing respect to those who fought for our freedom."

     


    And the heartwarming spirit didn't end there. "The respect continued on the plane," Vermeulen said, when "everyone stopped to thank these men for (their) service." The pilot thanked the veterans by name, she said, and informed the cabin as the plane passed over Normandy.

     

    "One of the veterans also celebrated his 95th birthday on the plane and everyone sang to him before we deplaned," she said.

     


    The experience struck a personal note for Vermeulen, who has several veterans in her family, including her grandfather who served as a marine in WWII.

     

    "It truly was beautiful," she said, "and it made the long plane ride, that would usually be filled with complaints of small bathrooms and uncomfortable seats that would usually be filled with complaints of small bathrooms and uncomfortable seats take on a whole new meaning of gratitude for what we are so lucky to have

    [/QUOTE]

    Beautiful!!!














     

     

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from georom4. Show georom4's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    My D Day lecture consists of showing the kids a map of all five beaches and how they were divided into sectors...then we watch the first twenty minutes of Saving Private Ryan....enough said.....

    rip to all those heroes and thank you to those who still remain

    As always - 100% correct!

     
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from TheExaminer. Show TheExaminer's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    Bill, I'm about as conservative as they come, and am against almost everything Obama has done. But still, I don't think this thread is the place for political posturing. My impression of this thread is to honor the brave men who took Normandy 70 years ago this day. Has to be one of the greatest military feats of all time. I need to get some books about it, because it escapes me how they were able to fight their way onto those beaches, and then up those bluffs while under rifle, artillery and pillbox machine gun fire. Truly amazing, thank you to all our brave veterans--including you Bill!

     

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from S5. Show S5's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to georom4's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    My D Day lecture consists of showing the kids a map of all five beaches and how they were divided into sectors...then we watch the first twenty minutes of Saving Private Ryan....enough said.....

    rip to all those heroes and thank you to those who still remain

    As always - 100% correct!

     [/QUOTE]

    You have a PM.

    Having the right to do something doesn't make it the right thing to do.

     

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from CubanPete. Show CubanPete's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    Whenever, someone tells me to "thank" a vet, I respond with:

    For what? Are we freer now than we were 25 years ago?

    As for WWI and WW2 Americans were freer before those wars than after them as well.

    Therefore, if these wars weren't for freedom, what where they for?

    Get all that, NSA?

    ...the King of the Rumba Beat...

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from JimfromFlorida. Show JimfromFlorida's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:
    [QUOTE]


    WHAT HAPPENED TO MY THREAD?

    [/QUOTE]

    Well Hammah you had one guy take it in another direction and then 3 others took that in another direction.

    One was wrong for making it about the events of the past week.

    The other 3 were wrong for reporting the other one just because they disagreed.

    Funny how what the Greatest Generation fought for is now so long forgotten by many Americans.

    BTW my Dad and four of his 9 brothers were in WWII all Navy. Dad was in the Aleutians. I never knew what he did . He never spoke of it. I always thought the Aleutians were just there to protect us from Japan coming that way. Never knew that there were some pretty fierce battles up there as well.

    LOVE my  Red Sox, Bs, Cs, Pats and enjoy the ride every year. 

     

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bill-806. Show Bill-806's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to TheExaminer's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Bill, I'm about as conservative as they come, and am against almost everything Obama has done. But still, I don't think this thread is the place for political posturing. My impression of this thread is to honor the brave men who took Normandy 70 years ago this day. Has to be one of the greatest military feats of all time. I need to get some books about it, because it escapes me how they were able to fight their way onto those beaches, and then up those bluffs while under rifle, artillery and pillbox machine gun fire. Truly amazing, thank you to all our brave veterans--including you Bill!

     

    [/QUOTE]CONCUR, and then the VETs of way back then are seeing what is going on today and are asking WHY ???  There is/needs to be questioning of the BIG O at this time !! 


     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from steven11. Show steven11's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Hard to believe that it is 70 years ago today that the greatest armada ever gathered at one time hit the beaches of Normandy to start what was the beginning of the end to the war in Europe. Some of those guys were only 18 years old. My dad's bomb group had a mission that day. To all those WW2 veterans I send out my gratitude and deepest respect for what they endured that day. May God bless them all.

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


    My father was first wave at Utah Beach.  Always spoke well of the French and how they helped the American Soldiers. 

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from BogieAt12oclock. Show BogieAt12oclock's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to Bill-806's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to illinoisredsox's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I think it should be a prerequisite to graduate high school, get a drivers license, become a citizen or for anyone whining to just watch the first 15 minutes of "Saving Private Ryan". Can you just imagine the door dropping on those Higgins boats knowing what you where about to face. Those guys were the greatest generation for a reason.

     

     

     

    We forget, too, that these guys weren't John Wayne; a lot of them were 19-21 years old, my sons' ages. They were kids, although they left their youth behind forever.

     

     

     

    Most never talked about it. My Dad graduated high school a few days after D-Day  and immediately entered the Navy. His older brother was among those who landed in Normandy that day and survived. We never heard stories about the war until the final couple weeks of his life. Dad just wouldn't talk about it. Neither would my uncle.

     

     

     

    Several years ago, one of my sons had a school assignment to interview a grandparent. One of the questions was the old standard, what did you dream about doing after high school. His reply shocked us. He said he had no dreams. He went on to explain that he knew he would be going to war, and that he did not expect to come home, and that most of the boys in his high school had the same expectation. Can you imagine going through your teenage years with that in the back of your mind?

     

     

     

    As we lose more and more of them each year (the youngest are nearly 90 years old), we have to remember them.

    [/QUOTE]Great response........  GOD SAVE THE USA  !!!


    [/QUOTE]

    God saves, but Esposito scores on the rebound.

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    Apparently it is not possible to start a tribute thread here without it getting derailed.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from 67redsox. Show 67redsox's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to TheExaminer's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Bill, I'm about as conservative as they come, and am against almost everything Obama has done. But still, I don't think this thread is the place for political posturing. My impression of this thread is to honor the brave men who took Normandy 70 years ago this day. Has to be one of the greatest military feats of all time. I need to get some books about it, because it escapes me how they were able to fight their way onto those beaches, and then up those bluffs while under rifle, artillery and pillbox machine gun fire. Truly amazing, thank you to all our brave veterans--including you Bill!

     

    [/QUOTE]

    I just finished watching part one of D-Day in HD on the history chanel.  Part two will be on tomorrow night.  

    I have watched lots of shows on WWll and I have to say this one is extremely well done.  Intense.  One guy had his cheek shot off, three pieces of shrapnel in his head, a hole in his foot from a mine and part of his lip shot off and he still fought. Unbelievable.

    It is a must see for anyone interested in D-Day.














     

     

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThatWasMe. Show ThatWasMe's posts

    Re: June the 6th 1944

    In response to redsoxdirtdog's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Let's not allow this excellent thread to be derailed.  Any further replies should not dignify any such attempts with so much as a single response.

    This was the penultimate moment in our history for this greatest generation!  Thank you is the least I can say to all our fathers and grandfathers who were there, or anywhere "over there!"

    Every year, I get more than choked up when discribing this moment in history to my students.  

    [/QUOTE]

    I agree RSDD, as strong as my political feelings run this is a day about the brave who saved the world from tyranny 70 years ago today.

    What they did is beyond comprehension. Truly the greatest generation.

     

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