Just a Walk in the Park

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from harv53. Show harv53's posts

    Just a Walk in the Park

    I think most would agree (except one who shall remain nameless) that the pitching has been sub-par, although May has seen promising improvement.

    Right now, the Sox are 4th in allowing 159 BBs, and tied for last with MN in WHIP at 1.42.

    Now, the walks by themselves wouldn't be such a bad thing except that it seems as though an extraordinary amount of these free passes end up scoring.
    Is there any way of knowing that of the 219 Runs Allowed by Sox pitching, how many of the 159 BB came around to score?

    Maybe Moon can come up with that stat. How about it Moon?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from harv53. Show harv53's posts

    Re: Just a Walk in the Park

    Thanks for all the responses. I guess I forgot why I left this forum before.
     
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  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from maxbialystock. Show maxbialystock's posts

    Re: Just a Walk in the Park

    Why should moonslav or anyone have the mission of making harv53's point?  Seems to me anyone can do the research, so why not harv53? 

    Besides, I think the point is already made.  The Sox pitching have given up a lot of walks and a lot of runs.  There is almost certainly a pretty good correlation.  And, if it isn't in the walked players scoring, it certainly can be seen in the number of innings pitched by the starters.  This especially applies to Buchholz and Bard, the walkz kings. 

    My pet gripe is the Sox baserunning, especially basestealing, which the Sox do worse than everybody except the Orioles.  

    In one of the Baltimore games the Sox won, the Orioles got three singles in one inning and, thanks to some walks by Buchholz, four runs. Later in the game, the Sox had three singles in one inning and no runs because Middlebrooks, the first single, decided to steal second and got tagged about a mile short of 2B.  It's possible he was told to steal or was going on a hit and run, but I don't think so.  Somewhere I read that Bill James or somebody says that basestealing is a good tactic only if you are successful 80% of the time.  The Sox have been successful 13 of 24 times, or 54%. The Orioles, 13 of 27 or 48%.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from harv53. Show harv53's posts

    Re: Just a Walk in the Park

    In Response to Re: Just a Walk in the Park:
    [QUOTE]Why should moonslav or anyone have the mission of making harv53's point?  Seems to me anyone can do the research, so why not harv53?  Besides, I think the point is already made.  The Sox pitching have give up a lot of walks and a lot of runs.  There is almost certainly a pretty good correlation.  And, if it isn't in the walked players scoring, it certainly can be seen in the number of innings pitched by the starters.  This especially applies to Buchholz and Bard, the walkz kings.  My pet gripe is the Sox baserunning, especially basestealing, which the Sox do worse than everybody except the Orioles.   In one of the Baltimore games the Sox won, the Orioles got three singles in one inning and, thanks to some walks by Buchholz, four runs. Later in the game, the Sox had three singles in one inning and no runs because Middlebrooks, the first single, decided to steal second and got tagged about a mile short of 2B.  It's possible he was told to steal or was going on a hit and run, but I don't think so.  Somewhere I read that Bill James or somebody says that basestealing is a good tactic only if you are successful 80% of the time.  The Sox have been successful 13 of 24 times, or 54%. The Orioles, 13 of 27 or 48%.
    Posted by maxbialystock[/QUOTE]

    I've tried to find the correlation but have failed.
    As far as the base-runninng, without Ells and Crawford, there is certainly a limit to the stealing. However, there should be a heck of lot more challenging of the opposition arms in going from 1st to 3rd or scoring from 1B on a long double.
    Remember the fielder has to do 3 things: comeup with it cleanly, make stong accurate throw, and make the throw one the cathcer can handle.
    I would say that only 50% of throws from the outfiled are accurate throws.
     
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  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from hankwilliamsjr. Show hankwilliamsjr's posts

    Re: Just a Walk in the Park

    Aggregate pitching stats are meaningless. Total runs allowed for the season is completely meaningless.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from hankwilliamsjr. Show hankwilliamsjr's posts

    Re: Just a Walk in the Park

    The pitching hasn't been "sub-par", it's been par. The offense has had at least 18 games where it scored 3 runs or less in Fenway/AL/DH, which accounts for the real problem of 1-17 in those games.

    Now, I want you to name any 2 pitchers from the AL to address your "it's the pitching". Then, I will put their numbers up for the starts of Doubrant and Bard against the same team and same venue. The value isn't in chasing FA pitchers or unloading the farm for veteran "ace" pitchers.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from hankwilliamsjr. Show hankwilliamsjr's posts

    Re: Just a Walk in the Park

    Moonshwemp has made up some "should have and expected" stats that include footnotes to explain park factor, etc for the aggregate and sum total stats he spends his idle time piddling with a spreadsheet software.

    I particularly liked his endless "stats" on why Wastefield was one one of the best #4 or #5 starters in all of MLB, which is why Wastefield saved the September collapse.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from harv53. Show harv53's posts

    Re: Just a Walk in the Park

    In Response to Re: Just a Walk in the Park:
    [QUOTE]The pitching hasn't been "sub-par", it's been par. The offense has had at least 18 games where it scored 3 runs or less in Fenway/AL/DH, which accounts for the real problem of 1-17 in those games. Now, I want you to name any 2 pitchers from the AL to address your "it's the pitching". Then, I will put their numbers up for the starts of Doubrant and Bard against the same team and same venue. The value isn't in chasing FA pitchers or unloading the farm for veteran "ace" pitchers.
    Posted by hankwilliamsjr[/QUOTE]

    Ok, which pitching stats have value, or somewhat accurately portray a pitchers performance?
    The walks are glaring Hank! You can't defense a BB and expecting the offense to overcome them all the time is not realistic.

    I realize that anyone can manipulate stats to back any argument, but you know as well as I do the pitching has not been up to standard based solely on the factthat is has been better for each SP in the past.

    Now, the BP has been remakable lately and except for Balkholz, the SP has been better of late.
    The offense is playing beyond their norms, largely from the scrubs, but the defense is still wholly vulnerable, especially in the OF (all), behind the plate (Salty) and at SS (Aviles).
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from 111SoxFan111. Show 111SoxFan111's posts

    Re: Just a Walk in the Park

    I don't know how to come up with the stat you asked for without going through each game and counting them manually.  What I can add is that for the month of May, the Sox are at a 3.78 ERA and have given up 79 walks in 205 IP (~3.5 BB / 9 IP) ... not great but not awful and given their offense, continuing along those lines should be enough to make the playoffs.  

    I am more worried about our missing #3 starter, Buchholz.  Hopefully, Buch will find his way.  If he doesn't, we'd better hope that Douby steps up enough to be a decent #3 and either Bard becomes more Bard-like or Cook/Dice/????? will give us more than a typical #5.
     
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