Mariano Rivera

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from southpaw777. Show southpaw777's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    Yes he Should be. But the powers that be, for some dumb azz reasons, will not do that.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from antibody. Show antibody's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    In response to djcbuffum's comment:

    This guy should be the first unanimous selection to the HOF:

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323741004578414814126864482.html




    He should be but there'll be one or two that won't vote for him.

    BTW, is that Mt. Katahdin in your avatar?

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    Since Babe Ruth and others of his ilk weren't, then nobody should. DiMaggio didn't even make it on his 1st ballot.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ice-Cream. Show Ice-Cream's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    Mariano Rivera is the greatest closer of all time.  

    I saw him a couple of times at the Dunkin Donuts off North Ave. in New Rochelle, NY.   He is a very humble and cool guy too.  

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from notin. Show notin's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    So a closer should be the first unanimous selection, but DHs are ineligible?

     

    I know the OP did not say that, but it certainly is a widely held opinion,  even among Hall voters...

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac35. Show pinstripezac35's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    In response to notin's comment:

    So a closer should be the first unanimous selection, but DHs are ineligible?

     

    I know the OP did not say that, but it certainly is a widely held opinion,  even among Hall voters...

     



    while a disagree with those who say

    mo should be the first unanimous selection

    I do admit that I feel a tad uncomfortable

    with my thinking it's fine for a DH to make the HOF

    but not winning the MVP

     
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  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from mef429. Show mef429's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    great stuff Jete. Mo is a class act.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from 67redsox. Show 67redsox's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    In response to jete02fan's comment:

    the other side of Mo.....No, Really: Tell Me About You
    Rivera's Farewell Tour Has an Unusual Wrinkle: Pregame Chats With Enemy Employees and Fans


    By DANIEL BARBARISI

    CLEVELAND—It is two hours before the scheduled start of Wednesday night's Yankees-Indians game, and baseball's all-time saves leader is deep inside the bowels of Progressive Field, holding a marching band's bass drum.

    Mariano Rivera wants to know how the drum's owner, John Adams, hits it when he's really mad.

    "When the Indians are supposed to score, and they don't score, how do you hit it?" Rivera asks.

    It isn't quite like that, explained Adams, who has been beating the drum at Indians games since 1973.


    "When there are people who you'd really like to hit, but you can't, you imagine their faces are on there, and you hit it…It's a stress reliever for me. And you've given me a lot of stress!" Adams says, prompting a laugh from the 43-year-old Yankee closer.
    Related

    Rivera ate it up, laughing along with the famous drummer. But he also turned serious, telling Adams how much he respected his longevity and the contributions he has made to baseball in Cleveland.

    "Hey, man, I love you for a long time," Rivera said. "You're loyal. You've been here a long time. I really respect that. You've been here what, 40 years? I've been here for 19 of those."

    When he was done talking with Adams, Rivera moved through a crowd of Indians employees, one by one, hearing stories from people who had worked on the grounds crew, or in the offices, or in ticketing.

    It is the part of his yearlong retirement tour that he has come to cherish the most.

    When Rivera decided to retire, he announced that in each ballpark, he wanted to meet people behind the scenes—employees or fans or people connected to the game who don't get to tell their stories. He has spent a lifetime in the spotlight, the solitary figure in the middle of the mound. But as his baseball career enters his final months, Rivera has found pleasure in quiet moments with everyday people who perform the often thankless jobs of the baseball world.

    "When I retired, I wanted to do something different, something that people don't see," Rivera said. "It doesn't always have to be the same on the field. There's a lot of other people that run the teams. They are here but we don't see them."

    So before games in each road city, Rivera can be found deep in some back room, chatting it up with staffers from each club.

    They ask him questions—his favorite team (1998) toughest enemy hitter (former Seattle Mariners designated hitter Edgar Martinez) or his first sporting love (soccer). But just as much, Rivera wants to hear from them—their memorable moments, their love of baseball, their favorite players.

    "I wanted to hear that," he said. "I wanted to hear what they think, and all of them were thankful."

    He spent close to an hour with 25 staffers in Cleveland, the second stop on Rivera's ballpark tour. In Detroit, Rivera met with a former Tigers groundskeeper, a U.S. Navy veteran, and a longtime season ticket holder.

    Before each series, Yankees director of communications and media relations Jason Zillo confers with his counterpart about the types of people Rivera wants to meet, and the clubs handpick the attendees.

    "He gave me the parameters, and until I screw up, he's letting me run with it," Zillo said, adding that they will vary the types of meetings in each city.

    There are still the unavoidable on-field ceremonies, where teams give Rivera framed pictures or jars of dirt. And Rivera is trying to enjoy those, though they make him uncomfortable. But the real pleasure of his final season is coming before the games, deep underneath the stands, hearing stories from the people he says have allowed him to flourish over the years.

    "This is what it is," Rivera said. "You want to be able to say thanks to these people. No one sees these people. You take the time to say thanks."




    Mo is a class act but I can't stand the drum guy.  If I had to sit in the park near him and listen to that drum during the game I would go nuts. 

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from SonicsMonksLyresVicars. Show SonicsMonksLyresVicars's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    Let's not forget history's greatest pinch hitter, Manny Mota:

    Cold off the bench:

    .300/.373/.368/.741 (592 PAs)

     

    I'm not really comparing Mota to Rivera....of course Rivera is a slam dunk HOFer...and I think most recent entrants aren't fit to shine Babes/Teds/Sandys/Willies shoes.

    But he's the best-ever at his specialism....

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from phxvlsoxfan. Show phxvlsoxfan's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    Mo will be first ballot for sure but you know there are voters that have the opinion that closer is the most over-rated position in baseball history, so they will not vote for him.  The first guy I think with a legit chance for unamunois entry also is wearing pinstripes and nearing his career's end (and is not named ARod).

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ice-Cream. Show Ice-Cream's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    During Mariano's last game at Fenway, he deserves a very long and warm, standing ovation. 

     

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from ThefourBs. Show ThefourBs's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    In response to Ice-Cream's comment:

    During Mariano's last game at Fenway, he deserves a very long and warm, standing ovation. 

     




    And he'll get it too.

     
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  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from greenwellforpresident. Show greenwellforpresident's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    In response to phxvlsoxfan's comment:

    Mo will be first ballot for sure but you know there are voters that have the opinion that closer is the most over-rated position in baseball history, so they will not vote for him.  The first guy I think with a legit chance for unamunois entry also is wearing pinstripes and nearing his career's end (and is not named ARod).




    Unfortunately there are voters who have stated that they never vote for anyone on their first year of eligibility so noone will ever be unanimous.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Gravelten4. Show Gravelten4's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    In response to djcbuffum's comment:

    In response to antibody's comment:

     

    BTW, is that Mt. Katahdin in your avatar?

     




     

    Not Katahdin. White Rocks Mountain, Wallingford, Vermont. The photo was taken from Peter Crook Knoll. My back yard when I was growing up.



    Haha...I thought it was knifes edge mt.katahdin as well!

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from greenwellforpresident. Show greenwellforpresident's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    In response to Gravelten4's comment:

    In response to djcbuffum's comment:

     

    In response to antibody's comment:

     

    BTW, is that Mt. Katahdin in your avatar?

     




     

    Not Katahdin. White Rocks Mountain, Wallingford, Vermont. The photo was taken from Peter Crook Knoll. My back yard when I was growing up.

     



    Haha...I thought it was knifes edge mt.katahdin as well!

     



    Way too many trees for Knifes edge

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from LloydDobler. Show LloydDobler's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    In response to nhsteven's comment:

    Since Babe Ruth and others of his ilk weren't, then nobody should. DiMaggio didn't even make it on his 1st ballot.




    I disagree. Just because the writers were morons then doesn't mean they still should be. Mo most definitely should be unanimous, and I can't think of anyone today more deserving.

     

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from LloydDobler. Show LloydDobler's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    In response to ThefourBs' comment:

    And he'll get it too.


    Absolutely. We Red Sox fans may hate all  things pinstripes,  but we always give credit where it's due. We'll cheer Jeter, too. At least I will.

     

     

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from 86redsox. Show 86redsox's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    best one inning closer. wiffle ball like cutter. wonder what his broken bat tally is?

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from LloydDobler. Show LloydDobler's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    I know a kid from our area who is in the Yankees' system now. Told me last year he got to bat against Rivera in the spring (before the injury). Was totally expecting the cutter and got it. Fouled off the first  pitch and broke his bat.

    Yes, he got Rivera to sign the bat.

     

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from jasko2248. Show jasko2248's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    The epitome of class, a phenomenal career and he may get the highest percentage of votes ever on the 1st ballot, but he won't be unanimous for the reasons already stated, right or wrong.  

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from antibody. Show antibody's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    In response to djcbuffum's comment:

    In response to antibody's comment:

     

    BTW, is that Mt. Katahdin in your avatar?

     



    Not Katahdin. White Rocks Mountain, Wallingford, Vermont. The photo was taken from Peter Crook Knoll. My back yard when I was growing up.



    Nice back yard. The shape resembles Katahdin but it's hard to see much detail in these small photos. Didn't pick out the trees. I miss mountains. Been in South Florida too long.

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from susan250. Show susan250's posts

    Re: Mariano Rivera

    In response to 67redsox's comment:

    In response to jete02fan's comment:

     

    the other side of Mo.....No, Really: Tell Me About You
    Rivera's Farewell Tour Has an Unusual Wrinkle: Pregame Chats With Enemy Employees and Fans


    By DANIEL BARBARISI

    CLEVELAND—It is two hours before the scheduled start of Wednesday night's Yankees-Indians game, and baseball's all-time saves leader is deep inside the bowels of Progressive Field, holding a marching band's bass drum.

    Mariano Rivera wants to know how the drum's owner, John Adams, hits it when he's really mad.

    "When the Indians are supposed to score, and they don't score, how do you hit it?" Rivera asks.

    It isn't quite like that, explained Adams, who has been beating the drum at Indians games since 1973.


    "When there are people who you'd really like to hit, but you can't, you imagine their faces are on there, and you hit it…It's a stress reliever for me. And you've given me a lot of stress!" Adams says, prompting a laugh from the 43-year-old Yankee closer.
    Related

    Rivera ate it up, laughing along with the famous drummer. But he also turned serious, telling Adams how much he respected his longevity and the contributions he has made to baseball in Cleveland.

    "Hey, man, I love you for a long time," Rivera said. "You're loyal. You've been here a long time. I really respect that. You've been here what, 40 years? I've been here for 19 of those."

    When he was done talking with Adams, Rivera moved through a crowd of Indians employees, one by one, hearing stories from people who had worked on the grounds crew, or in the offices, or in ticketing.

    It is the part of his yearlong retirement tour that he has come to cherish the most.

    When Rivera decided to retire, he announced that in each ballpark, he wanted to meet people behind the scenes—employees or fans or people connected to the game who don't get to tell their stories. He has spent a lifetime in the spotlight, the solitary figure in the middle of the mound. But as his baseball career enters his final months, Rivera has found pleasure in quiet moments with everyday people who perform the often thankless jobs of the baseball world.

    "When I retired, I wanted to do something different, something that people don't see," Rivera said. "It doesn't always have to be the same on the field. There's a lot of other people that run the teams. They are here but we don't see them."

    So before games in each road city, Rivera can be found deep in some back room, chatting it up with staffers from each club.

    They ask him questions—his favorite team (1998) toughest enemy hitter (former Seattle Mariners designated hitter Edgar Martinez) or his first sporting love (soccer). But just as much, Rivera wants to hear from them—their memorable moments, their love of baseball, their favorite players.

    "I wanted to hear that," he said. "I wanted to hear what they think, and all of them were thankful."

    He spent close to an hour with 25 staffers in Cleveland, the second stop on Rivera's ballpark tour. In Detroit, Rivera met with a former Tigers groundskeeper, a U.S. Navy veteran, and a longtime season ticket holder.

    Before each series, Yankees director of communications and media relations Jason Zillo confers with his counterpart about the types of people Rivera wants to meet, and the clubs handpick the attendees.

    "He gave me the parameters, and until I screw up, he's letting me run with it," Zillo said, adding that they will vary the types of meetings in each city.

    There are still the unavoidable on-field ceremonies, where teams give Rivera framed pictures or jars of dirt. And Rivera is trying to enjoy those, though they make him uncomfortable. But the real pleasure of his final season is coming before the games, deep underneath the stands, hearing stories from the people he says have allowed him to flourish over the years.

    "This is what it is," Rivera said. "You want to be able to say thanks to these people. No one sees these people. You take the time to say thanks."

     




    Mo is a class act but I can't stand the drum guy.  If I had to sit in the park near him and listen to that drum during the game I would go nuts. 

     


    Great article about Mo.  Very interesting that he is meeting long-time employees in every city. 

     

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