Mental Lapses

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    Mental Lapses

    There are many indicators that the Sox, as a team, are not mentally alert. Baserunning is only one.  They take too many good pitches and swing at too many bad ones.  Their defensive alignments do not always appear thought out. They are too often overtaken by events.  Yes, as someone says, players react in the moment, but that doesn't excuse bad judgment; and they don't look like they are thinking ahead.  It's more like, "Oops, what now?"  By then, it's too late. Reactions are either good or bad. Boston's are too often bad. 
    They don't make these mistakes all the time, of course, but the fact that a veteran team makes so many of them is troubling.  The Sox are, in short, a sloppy baseball team at the moment. That betokens a lack of readiness.
     
     
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    Re: Mental Lapses

    Compared to whom?
    Do other teams have less mental lapses? More?
     
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    Re: Mental Lapses

    In Response to Re: Mental Lapses:
    Compared to whom? Do other teams have less mental lapses? More?
    Posted by harness
    I don't know, and it really doesn't matter.  If mental lapses are killing a team, that's all you need to know. You can deal only with what's in front of you. If it's bad, it's bad, regardless of what's happening elsewhere. 
    One poster said that other teams get doubled off on line drives, as though that makes it OK for the same thing to happen to the Sox.  The logical extension of this position is that mistakes are forgivable, or at least understandable, as long as other people are making them too.  The implications of this attitude do not need to be spelled out.  

     
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    Re: Mental Lapses

    Let me add that the Sox are supposed to be one of the top teams -- if not the 
    ( ahem ) best team in baseball.  If this assessment is correct. or even close, then mistakes are probably ( must be? ) hurting the Sox more than mistakes are hurting lesser talented teams that are doing better than Boston. This seems a reasonable inference.  On the basis of the demonstrated capabilities of Boston's players, the team was not overrated in pre-season. Over-hyped, yes, but not overrated.  ( Leave aside the 100-win predictions. )  The club is indisputably under-achieving.  
    Right, lately the club has done "better" than during its miserable start, but it continues to sputter -- 3 and 4 in the current home stand -- and has yet to show signs of even an incipient consistency.  It can't establish any traction. Maybe that will come. ( The sooner the better. It isn't THAT early. ) But it won't come unless the team starts playing better between the ears.  Whatever the reason(s) for lack of discipline, it's written all over this team.  
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from harness. Show harness's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    I disagree. How is anything seen objectively without drawing some kind of comparison? You see base-running gaffs and start a thread about it. Fine.
    Is this team supposed to be perfect on the bases?
    Do you post positively about all the aggressive risks that pay off?

    First of all, each base-running blunder is subject to debate, given the game conditions at the time. Some risks should be taken more so than others depending on the situation. For example, in the 13-inning game, the BP was running on empty. So, the base runners took greater risks.

    Every team has it's share of mental lapses. What if the RedSox are actually among the league-leaders in fewest mental lapses?
    If we didn't have access to criteria depicting defenses of other teams, we could whine about every error - never knowing if the team is defensively the best in baseball.

    As for your statement "lack of discipline" - how can you measure this without being in the clubhouse? Or in any team's clubhouse?
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from expitch. Show expitch's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    In Response to Re: Mental Lapses:
    I disagree. How is anything seen objectively without drawing some kind of comparison? You see base-running gaffs and start a thread about it. Fine. Is this team supposed to be perfect on the bases? Do you post positively about all the aggressive risks that pay off? First of all, each base-running blunder is subject to debate, given the game conditions at the time. Some risks should be taken more so than others depending on the situation. For example, in the 13-inning game, the BP was running on empty. So, the base runners took greater risks. Every team has it's share of mental lapses. What if the RedSox are actually among the league-leaders in fewest mental lapses? If we didn't have access to criteria depicting defenses of other teams, we could whine about every error - never knowing if the team is defensively the best in baseball. As for your statement "lack of discipline" - how can you measure this without being in the clubhouse? Or in any team's clubhouse?
    Posted by harness
    Lack of discipline shows on the field. Plenty. I don't care what happens in the club house.
    I disagree strongly that we need objective comparative data to judge what is happening before our eyes.  We disagree, therefore, in principle.  Are you going to design the criteria for the kind of study you seem to propose? Will it be entirely stat based?  Or will you have to take into account the mitigating or justifying circumstances you cite for every play? Or will there be specific guidelines, like in a long game with a depleted pen runners should take risks. Imagine the debate that would incite. I, for one, don't buy that proposition. What's more, though all risks are equal, some risks are more equal than others. We could argue forever about what risks are worth taking. In other words, you have already introduced subjectivity into an argument for greater objectivity. IMO, you are proposing an impossible task. Already, you have an opinion about one incident, and I have another.  And I completely reject your generalization that "each base-running blunder is subject to debate, given the game conditions at the time."  If so, then why call it a blunder? Why not call it a risk that didn't pay off because....? Would "debate" intend to introduce qualification into each and every case? Or will we have yet another new term: justifiable blunder?  
    But if you think that you can design a method of objective comparison, have a go.  Be sure to include a way to define and add up mental lapses so that we can know how all teams stand in relation to one another.  Maybe it can be a supplementary form of standings.  
    You, not I, raised "perfectability" on the bases. That's a red herring.  It cannot even be defined, objectively or any other way. ( "That guy should have taken the extra base" "No, he was smart to hold up." Which was the "perfect" move?) So why bring it up, except as a debate point. 
    I make no bones about the fact that I am making subjective judgements about how the Sox have played this season.  One of them is this: I have seen more bad base-running than good.  That's an opinion based on perception. Others can agree or disagree depending upon their own perceptions. That's what the board is for.  
    I still say that it's reasonable to infer that a talented club like the Sox would do better if it cut down on mistakes of all kinds, or at least do as well as other clubs that have less talent.  There's a sort of comparison for you.  Superior talent brings itself back to the pack, or below, when it makes too many mistakes. 
    My overall judgment stands. The Sox are not a mentally alert team at this point. And I still don't care what the players are doing in Kansas City or Florida. But, as I said, feel free to set up a persuasive system of objective comparisons.
    Oh, heck, go ahead and build in what you consider elements of reasonable subjectivity.  Just don't expect enough agreement to make a big sale.  

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from MadMc44. Show MadMc44's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Label them mental lapses or whatever you want.

    It starts behind the plate--they have to make a double barrelled change-Salty has to go, at least Salty and now, today. Personally the Boston venue is too much for him. Theo and Tito are bound and determined to make it work--forget the experiment.

    JD--make him a back-up in the OF or release him and start either Cam or DMac or bring up Haslam from the Sea Dogs. His taking called 3 rd strikes, pirouetting toward the dugout and/or  grounding out to first or second is getting ver, very old.

    Scutaro's running through the stop sign "Thursday AM" is just one of a number of Scu lapses in the first 30 games--he is playing well below his capabilities. I have enjoyed watching his play in the past.

    Remedies:
    Salty---waive him--he will probably clear waivers. Send him to Pawtucket-release Exposito. Bring up McKenry see what he's got. Look to trade for Ryan Doumit--I don't know but move Salty and possibly even Tek. 

    JD--keep him as a backup unless you can trade him even up--contract swap, perhaps for Carlos Beltran or a player not performing someplace else.

    Scu---look to deal--bring up Nate Spears as a super sub from the Paw Sox.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from BOSOX1941. Show BOSOX1941's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    It starts on the bench. It starts with the manager.
    I'm still absolutely confounded with his Lowrie at 1st and Youk at 3rd move..
    Certified managerial moron.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from piersall. Show piersall's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses





    "Every team has it's share of mental lapses. What if the RedSox are actually among the league-leaders in fewest mental lapses?
    If we didn't have access to criteria depicting defenses of other teams, we could whine about every error - never knowing if the team is defensively the best in baseball."-  Harness


    right on, harness.  I happened to be watching the FIRST PLACE yankees two days ago and yesterday.  One inning they had 2 guys picked off base  in plays that were major gaffs.  Yesterday they committed 4 errors.
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from southpaw777. Show southpaw777's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    It starts behind the plate--they have to make a double barrelled change-Salty has to go, at least Salty and now, today. Personally the Boston venue is too much for him. Theo and Tito are bound and determined to make it work--forget the experiment.

    I disagree..There is nobody right now that can take his spot..And NO, nobody is really ready in the minors.The closest is a year or 2 away I believe. Salty has started hitting the ball. Lets give it til at least June on this one.

    JD--make him a back-up in the OF or release him and start either Cam or DMac or bring up Haslam from the Sea Dogs. His taking called 3 rd strikes, pirouetting toward the dugout and/or  grounding out to first or second is getting ver, very old.

    I agree that JD looks awful this year so far. A change is needed. But JD WILL be here the rest of the year.

    Scutaro's running through the stop sign "Thursday AM" is just one of a number of Scu lapses in the first 30 games--he is playing well below his capabilities. I have enjoyed watching his play in the past.

    That blunder was on Bogar..He was waving Scoot in and put up the stop sign too late. But I do agree that Scutaro is not playing well so far either this year.





     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bill-806. Show Bill-806's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

      KILLING US, FOR SURE !!!!!
     
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    Re: Mental Lapses

    And I also really like what I see from the hassan kid so far this year. and hes a RHB that plays RF.

    http://soxprospects.com/players/hassan-alex.htm
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from harness. Show harness's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Ex-pitch: I'm not trying to sell anything. You are basing your take on your perception. If mental lapses as you describe occur frequently elsewhere, then you have to weigh the risk factor in every situation, for every game circumstance differs.

    It's like saying Tito is a lousy manager. You can point to many perceived poor moves. But such moves may have long-term value. In other words, until other managers are measured and critiqued in similar fashion, we really don't know how Tito stacks up. Every manager has his own foundation for his decisions.

    Some teams predicate fundamentals more than others. The Twins are known for this. But they also couldn't see Papi's impact due to a simple flaw in his swing. As a result, he was seen as a deterrent.

    Boston historically prioritizes hitting - especially those who would excel in Fenway.
    (This has changed somewhat under the new regime). That means other facets of the game are under less scrutiny. Under Theo, the emphasis (drafting, etc.) seems to be on pitching. Thus we have Lester/Paps/Bard etc. That's not a bad price to pay for not scrutinizing fundamentals.

    I'm not saying I disagree with you, but there's a bigger picture to be seen. Organizations differ in their approach, from scouting to developmental to where time is best allocated. This team could go 10 games without a mental lapse, yet I doubt daring, successful base-running will get the attention the team has received over the past few games.

    I also agree in that it's very difficult to measure mental lapses from team to team, but singling out one home team for this without drawing some kind of comparison is rather short-sighted. The burden of relativity is on the author of the subject matter.
     
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  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from expitch. Show expitch's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Nope, Harness, the burden is on you.  You say that some kind of comparison must be made. I challenged you to make it. You haven't come up with a form. Apparently you still don't, or won't see, that we differ at the the level of assumption.  You simply declare your assumption correct as the foundation of this argument. It is that judgment should be withheld unless it's based upon "some kind" of comparative scale. I don't accept that assumption. But even if did, I'd still be left deciding whether the comparative scale ( if you ever propose one ) is a valid method of judgment. One might say, "I see and even approve what you are trying to do. But I don't think you're doing it very well." An idea is merely a concept, not a scheme or mechanism.  You tell me that I should have one. I don't think. But since the idea of a comparative scale is yours, I think that you should come up with a scale.  I can't allow you to shift the burden of proof by mere declaration. 
    Of course I'm basing my take on perception rooted in long experience. I've alrerady said that. It's my MO, and I can apply it directly to a single team if I choose.  Direct judgments on a local ( or single ) situation are made all the time in argumentation in myriad domains. You can question the debater's experience, perception, and conclusions, but you cannot flatly declare them inadmissible or "short-sighted" ( the meaning of which here is not entirely clear) because they do not meet the requirements that follow from your assumptions. 
    Pardon my bluntness, but your talk about Terry ( whom I have not mentioned ) and differing philosophies amongst various organizations strikes me as mostly diversionary fluff.  Good and bad fundamental baseball are just that, wherever the game is played. It is foundational. On top of it, a given team may choose to emphasize speed or power or pitching or defense to establish its own character.
    But none of these elements ever escapes the importance of fundamentals, as, I might say, is being illustrated by the current edition of the Boston Red Sox. And I don't need to look elsewhere or to make comparisons in order to observe what is happening right in front of my disappointed eyes. ( An understatement.)
    In short, I decline to argue on your terms, which are merely asserted, but not to deny you the opportunity to illustrate how those terms would work in practice.
     
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    Re: Mental Lapses

    On the money, ex-pitch.
     
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    Re: Mental Lapses

    Opinions are just that. Opinions. You are entitled to yours. That's the beauty of this forum. Many here weigh opinions beyond one's perception, as it's often debateable. "That was no strike"!
    "Yeah, but K-ZONE had it on the top corner...".

    "What a dumb play by Cam, trying to take 3rd".
    "Yeah, but the pen was on empty and maybe Tito said to be more aggressive".

    Many ways to look at things, which is why drawing comparisons allows for a better frame of reference. To say the Redsox are not fundamentally sound is relative to whom is.

    In UR OP, you didn't state any examples of these mental lapses. Isn't that on you?
    Yeah, comparative studies on this are difficult to measure. But the very fact they are tough to quantify makes the perception of them all the more obscure.

    My point about what organizations prioritize was hardly diversionary. Some devote more time to fundamentals than others. But that doesn't mean those who don't scrutinize it aren't focusing attention, time and energy elsewhere.

    The RedSox don't avocate their pitchers using the slide-step. This is not to divert anything; just illustrating organizational approach. It affects SB's and the catchers get a bad wrap. Once runners exploited the lack of time spent on limiting SB's last year, it was addressed in different ways.

    And I have to believe that if the FO saw these "mental lapses" as being as problematic as you suggest, then it too will be addressed. A manager and his staff can do only so much in an allotted time period. The more focus spent on one area, the less on another.

    Now, if you feel not enough time is devoted to fundamentals, then perhaps that's a reflection on the absence of Brad Mills. I felt the team could have been better prepared out of ST, but I also clearly stated that it's just an opinion. I have no way to prove it. In fact, I think it's too early in the season to make any definitive judgements.


     
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    Re: Mental Lapses

    Six weeks of ST training is plenty of time to address everything. What the hell else have the players and staff got to do? The subject matter is not space exploration.  Then the players and staff are together for six months. Who says things cannot be worked on during the season?
    You don't pay attention to fundamentals, you pay the price sooner or later. The "elsewhere" you refer to is not, one assumes, outside the game of baseball. Wherever it is and whatever it is, fundamentals apply, as I said in my last post. I don't know how else to say it. Heck, the term itself says it. 
    Perception is not "obscure" if you know what you should be looking for. You see, you start with a premise again: If it can't be quantified, it's probably obscure -- or at least that's the implication.  I don't buy the premise.  As I said in my last post --- and will not say again -- we disagree because we have different starting points. I am certainly not going to shift to yours. That makes for an impasse.  
    Look, I don't keep a fine book of all the mistakes I see, as my coach did, and as I did as a coach. I have on this thread and elsewhere mentioned mistakes. But here's a big one -- a basic one: this club takes too many good pitches and swings at too many bad ones. The situational hitting is abominable. Whether the Royals or Reds do it too is beside the point, as is true of everything else in the game. What counts is that it's hurting the Boston Red Sox. Comparisons with other clubs are not necessary to make that direct judgment. What good would it do in practice to know about the other clubs? Make Boston's mistakes more palatable? Be a source of consolation?   
    OK, I'm reporting an impression that the Sox are mistake prone. I have never pretended otherwise. People will either agree or disagree with the proposition. My impressions were schooled by three years as a player and two as a coach under a master, along with many long conversations socially and on trips.  I am not in this forum going to write a dissertation on baseball. But I am writing a book on Rod.  How he and I see the game will all be there -- if the damn thing ever gets published.
    Let me repeat a point that I've already stated twice. I don't know and don't care whether other clubs are prone to make more or fewer or the same number of mistakes as are the Sox.  But it is as least suggestive that ones with less talent than Boston are doing better. This "comparison" does not "prove" that the Sox are making more mistakes. It's just food for thought.  But it's not gruel either. 
    Oh, foo, this topic is for the moment at a dead end.  
    Right now the Sox are a pretty bad baseball team -- a terrible team if judged against reasonable expectations. They are a slack outfit. Yup, that's my opinion.  

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from Boomerangsdotcom. Show Boomerangsdotcom's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Last I looked the Redsox were still among the league leaders in fewest errors made. I don't think the salient problem is mental lapses. It's hitting with RISP. It's defensive range in the infield. It's pitchers hitting their spots.

    The offense should fix itself over time. The pitching probably improves also over time. The infield range is a weakness, especially on the left side. Gonzalez is having an excellent year defensively according to the numbers but Youk seemed to have better range to me at first. We do not have strong defensive range on the left side. Too many balls are finding the OF grass.
     
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    Re: Mental Lapses

    Ouch.

    That's what I say about the last few days.

    And I blame the 13 inning loss for the largest part of it.  

    Lackey for the first time didn't have it against the Halos.  First time - and it happened now.  

      Bad timing, no?

    Then Wake was thrown into the fray, as a "good soldier" - and I know there are threads all about that - but he certainly could have been helped by a just three plays.  
       
      Jed Lowery had a bad day.  But he's had so many good ones - this one just bit Wake in the butt.

      Adrian whiffed on one, too .... on a play that is normally a solid play.

      BOTH are hitting well.

    Bad timing?

      Mental lapses?

      Certainly.

    But it really shows how close we are to all of it coming together.

      A couple balks ... for Pete's sake, when was the last time you've seen that?

    More importantly, will we see it again?  I doubt it.



      We had people make fun of us losing to the Tribe.  Cuz they are such losers. ...anyone notice that 20 others have lost to them????

       Suhprize!

     
      We lost to the defending AL champs .... suhprize!



      Ok, ok ... it did surprise us, me.  But take it for what it's worth.  It isn't just Boston playing poorly at times.  It is also that other teams are playing well.


      Would we love to play LAA everyday?  We're 6-2 against them.  Almost 7-1.

    No doubt about it, there were errors and the perfect storm of poor timing, tired bodies and spent bull pen all came together to hurt the Sox these last few games.

       I fully expect we'll see more.  But not enough to stop us from heading in the right direction and getting to the World Series.  

        Ouch, still. 
     
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from expitch. Show expitch's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Boomer, you identify flaws very well.  However, fielding percentage in itself is not necessarily the best measure of defensive effectiveness, as you point out when referring to range.  Beltre's great range to his left allowed the SS to cheat a little toward center, which, in turn allowed the second baseman to cheat a little towards right. Beltre also covered for shortstops who lack range to their right. Thus, IMO, his presence made a big difference. Too many balls are getting through on the left side.  Ellsbury does not consistently get good jumps or take the best routes to a ball. That will not show up in fielding percentage. And so on.
    On the mental side, batters too frequently are not moving runners over or are not using their heads with a runner on third and less than two outs.  They are up there hacking. One result is more runners left in scoring position.  This is one aspect of a general tendency to take good and to swing at bad pitches. My impression is that this club does more of it than clubs in the recent past. It's a mental mistake, as though the batter may be at the plate physically but elsewhere mentally. Perhaps they are pressing in an attempt to overcome the rocky start.  But it's the wrong way to go about it.  
    The Sox are having trouble on the bases. Some posters have said that runners get too much blame for mistakes and too little credit for good running plays. I agree with this.  But, IMO, the club still makes too many running mistakes. I realize that others do not agree with  what I call a mistake, or they offer circumstantial qualification. Fair enough.  But I can only observe what I observe and think what I think. No one, I assume, would maintain that the Sox run the bases well on the whole. Much of base-running is mental, or, if you will, judgmental.  
    Several times I have been puzzled by defensive alignments. Just to give one example, Pedroia was playing too close to second with a runner there, when the real danger was that a ball hit to his left would go through and score the runner. And a mini-shift was not on and shouid not have been on. Even if the guy steals third, someone has to pick him up. A single probably scores him. I assume that alignments come from the dugout; coaches are very much part of the mental equipment of a club.  I wonder sometimes too why Youk is not playing further back. Unlike Beltre, he needs a split second or two more to get to a ball hit to his left. A little more depth would help.  
    I would call what I have been describing as mental mistakes. In addition, the Sox seem to be playing on their heels, as if they are waiting for something to happen or for someone else to make something happen. That is what I mean above by slackness.  
    I was schooled to think that bad throws are mental mistakes.  Not each and every one, perhaps, but by far most of them. The Sox have made a lot of them. If we don't want to call them flat out bad throws, let's at least concede that they are not good throws.  Making good and bad throws is a matter of anticipation, concentration, and habit, like the rest of baseball.  Once again, I doubt that anyone would seriously argue that the Sox look like a club, in general, that has got into good habits. And that's mental.
    As my first paragraph indicates, I'm with you about what ails this club. but the ailments do not stop there. Some of them are between the ears. Why this should be so beats me. But it is obvious, at least from my vantage point. 
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from M1A2. Show M1A2's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Mental mistakes?  That's the ultimate conspiracy theory--you are hypothesizing something that can't be proven or disproven. 

    Me, I prefer to stick to statistics, and right now the stats and the scores say the Sox pitching is lousy--just like it was last year--but this time the hitting isn't good enough to make up for the pitching. 

    This thread was started after the Sox lost three in a row, but especially after the last two debacles, 9-2 and 11-0.  If you replay those games and have the Sox make absolutely no errors, they still get clobbered primarily because of lousy pitching.  Last night Wakefield's knuckler was hittable, in part because the homeplate umpire was squeezing him, especially on pitches down in the strike zone.  And the day before Lackey was hittable.  It's that simple. 

    Three of the Sox infielders--A-Gon, Youk, and Pedroia--have won gold gloves, as has Carl Crawford in LF.  And Drew in RF is probably the best outfielder the Sox have.  So I'm not sure how anyone can say they are constantly making bad throws and mental mistakes. 



     
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    Re: Mental Lapses

    In Response to Re: Mental Lapses:
    Last I looked the Redsox were still among the league leaders in fewest errors made. I don't think the salient problem is mental lapses. It's hitting with RISP. It's defensive range in the infield. It's pitchers hitting their spots. The offense should fix itself over time. The pitching probably improves also over time. The infield range is a weakness, especially on the left side. Gonzalez is having an excellent year defensively according to the numbers but Youk seemed to have better range to me at first. We do not have strong defensive range on the left side. Too many balls are finding the OF grass.
    Posted by Boomerangsdotcom


      The entire construct of the team this year deserves questioning, starting at 1B. We already had Kevin Youkilis, a player with nary a flaw, offensively or defensively. Granted, Youk will not live for ever, and has probably reached his peak, that being said, swapping Beltre for A-Gon was barely a net gain , and when you factor in the additional dollars and prospects it becomes tougher to equalize the investment.  Item number two is signing Crawford over Jason Werth. No doubt the Sox had the resources to get Werth, getting outmanuevered by Washington is surprising, and adding another LH hitter to the line-up has created an un-natural inbalance. This inbalance is amplified by the scouring of the minor league depth charts for the next RH power hitter. Werth, no one can deny plays with a certain zest, that is unmistakeable and admirable, a zest that is clearly lacking from this group of predestined winners. If there is one thing I've learned in business, it is, whenever someone declares such and such operation is a "gold mine",  it never is. The same can be said for the detestable phrase, "best off-season". Item number three is RF. JD Drew has been on a downward trajectory since he cashed his first payroll check. It makes no difference that he has another year left to go, strange how Mike Cameron was good enough to replace Ells in center last year, but not good enough to replace Drew in right this year. A fundamental tenet of this team vs last year was that the OF would automatically improve over the limited production of Nava, D-Mac, Patterson, and Kalish, because this has not really happened, and until it does, I'm reminded of Bill Parcels; "You are what your record says you are".
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from expitch. Show expitch's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    In Response to Re: Mental Lapses:
    Mental mistakes?  That's the ultimate conspiracy theory--you are hypothesizing something that can't be proven or disproven.  Me, I prefer to stick to statistics, and right now the stats and the scores say the Sox pitching is lousy--just like it was last year--but this time the hitting isn't good enough to make up for the pitching.  This thread was started after the Sox lost three in a row, but especially after the last two debacles, 9-2 and 11-0.  If you replay those games and have the Sox make absolutely no errors, they still get clobbered primarily because of lousy pitching.  Last night Wakefield's knuckler was hittable, in part because the homeplate umpire was squeezing him, especially on pitches down in the strike zone.  And the day before Lackey was hittable.  It's that simple.  Three of the Sox infielders--A-Gon, Youk, and Pedroia--have won gold gloves, as has Carl Crawford in LF.  And Drew in RF is probably the best outfielder the Sox have.  So I'm not sure how anyone can say they are constantly making bad throws and mental mistakes. 
    Posted by M1A2
    I am not hypothesizing. I am reporting observations and impressions. Einstein,  who knew a little bit about numbers, said that not everything that be counted really counts and much that cannot be counted really does count.  
    Derek Jeter won a gold glove.  It's probably the least reliable award of all. I don't know about "anyone," but I didn't say that the Sox are "constantly making bad throws."  But I have seen enough throws that are unnecessarily hurried or off line to call them "not good" throws. I have also seen what I would frankly call bad throws to the relay man -- too low or too much to one side -- and throws that either miss the cutoff man or make him move too much and have to reset. These are mental mistakes. These kinds of throws cost seconds and can make a difference. Over the course of a season, these mistakes add up -- even if they are not made constantly.  There is no excuse for them. 
    Conspiracy? Where did that idea come from? I'm just one man alone commenting on what he observes.

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    On the mental side, batters too frequently are not moving runners over or are not using their heads with a runner on third and less than two outs.  They are up there hacking. One result is more runners left in scoring position.  This is one aspect of a general tendency to take good and to swing at bad pitches. My impression is that this club does more of it than clubs in the recent past. It's a mental mistake, as though the batter may be at the plate physically but elsewhere mentally. Perhaps they are pressing in an attempt to overcome the rocky start.  But it's the wrong way to go about it.    - Expitch


    RISP has been an ancient yet prevailing concern and bugaboo.

    Pressing at the plate does seem to hurt.  But that can't really be called mental lapses.  Unless you're saying that they care too much and that's a lapse.  I know you're talking about trying to stay relaxed and taking the pitches and perhaps pushing up the pitch count ... but there are times when sitting back seems so unproductive.  We've started to read that here ... any number of comments have been made about how we need to give that up and get aggressive.  

    Adrian's hitting well.  Carl's turning things around.  Papi's hitting fairly well.  Pedey's in one of his patented slides (cold streaks) from which he will emerge like a meteor burning through the atmosphere.  Jake's hitting better.  Even Salty's hitting better.  Youk's .... getting on.  Hitting better is ahead for him ...

    I'd rather they get these things out of the way now than run into them in July and then feel like the choke is coming.  

    I do think things will work out.  I do think the concentration and the meshing of talents will continue to improve.

       
     
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