Mental Lapses

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  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from southpaw777. Show southpaw777's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Lots of new faces this year..No matter the talent, its takes some time to gel and find your place within the organization and a new city. The track records speak for themselves. This team will be good despite some early season issues that will and are being worked out, ie;bullpen issues..Thats what having lots of depth is for.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from SculEsqare. Show SculEsqare's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Once these guys introduce themselves to each other, start talking to each other in the d-out, start sitting next to a team member in the d-out and realize this is a TEAM sport they will be all right, but first the coaches should introduce themselves to the ball players and somewhat look in charge so ma-b just ma-b
    we can get to play some serious TEAM BASEBALL!
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from expitch. Show expitch's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Yaz, I'm not recommending passivity at the plate. But there is a difference between being aggressive and hacking, between being dialed in and being over-anxious.  Nor am I recommending that batters should think primarily of running up pitch counts.  What I'd like to see is better concentration and smarter AB's. 
    When guys don't hit, they press and hit even less, and then press even more. All of this is, yes, IMO mental.  

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from harness. Show harness's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    I think the area in question is where physical talent ends - and mental lapses begin. And while it's very much a thinking man's game, there's no substitute for God-given talent. You can critique hitting all you want, but at it's best, it fails 60-70% of the time. Personally, I don't equate mental lapses with the shear difficulty of hitting.

    That being said, I do think this team is in transition - from historically being a station-to-station dominant team at home - to a post-steroid squad searching for proper approach.

    And while coaches pound fundamentals into or brains at lower levels of competition, it's assumed that this has already been incorporated into players who have the ability to reach the highest level.

    Where the mental aspect of the game is in a given situation is almost instinctual IMO. It's reflective of ability. And not just physical ability. While Beltre was dazzling minds with spectacular range, he also made countless stupid mistakes. I watched him for years in Seattle. His intensity level worked for and against him.

    It's hard to pinpoint any one area of a team Theo felt would be better suited multi-dimensionally as opposed to home advantage dominance. I honestly think it's more a matter of finding a proper team approach than it is anything else. The search for this identity will result in varied perceptions. Being mentally "in-between" can be seen as "lapses". Aggressiveness can be taken for "blunders".

    Once they strike a cohesive chord, I think the process will be clearer to a fan-base currently in the fog.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from expitch. Show expitch's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    The fact that hitting is hard is why batters should not help the pitcher by swinging at bad pitches.  That's mental most of the time. 
    It's just as easy for pros as for amateurs to fall into bad habits at any level. It should not be assumed that what was "pounded into their heads" in the minors is there for good and in all situations. Spring training is a time to go over all of it again.
    I agree that some players seem to have an instinct for the game. But training can instill habits that become second nature so that even players not gifted with great feel are mentally prepared.
    Your next to last paragraph does not account, IMO, for the kind of mistakes the Sox have been making. 

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from harness. Show harness's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    I think this team is in transition. And it is ear-marked by the FO commitment to Crawford. The mindset of playing for the big inning and seeing right-handed sluggers hit 3-run dingers is changing.
    The era of home dominance is over.
    The advent of seeing a team play on the road at any level is beginning.
    The stage of aggressive base-running will play itself out in various game-altering theatre - with wavering results.
    And as a result, it's affecting the individual parts. (This is currently being discussed at length on Moon's Realistic thread).

    As for you statement about hitting, it's a lot easier said than done.
    To lay off pitches way out of the zone when the mind is focusing on a 95 MPH fastball has plagued hitters since the game began.
    It has nothing to do with mental lapses. It has everything to do with team approach and player skill-set.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    In Response to Re: Mental Lapses:
    Yaz, I'm not recommending passivity at the plate. But there is a difference between being aggressive and hacking, between being dialed in and being over-anxious.  Nor am I recommending that batters should think primarily of running up pitch counts.  What I'd like to see is better concentration and smarter AB's.  When guys don't hit, they press and hit even less, and then press even more. All of this is, yes, IMO mental.  
    Posted by expitch


    Couldn't agree more.  But I'm just
    wondering how to get them to relax .....
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from expitch. Show expitch's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Everything is baseball is a lot easier said than done, especially hitting. 
    I disagree with your contention that swinging at bad pitches "has nothing to do with mental lapses. It has everything to do with team approach and player skill-set."  The idea that team approach leads individuals to swing at bad pitches is just plain silly.  A player whose skill set doesn't change will get into the habit of swinging at bad pitches. The problem during that stretch has to do with focus, concentration, and judgment. All mental attributes.  The skill-set is the constant.
    The other things are the variables.  They are not governed by team approach. 
    Players will say that they don't feel comfortable or even " feel all screwed up at the plate."  They don't say that God is lowering my skill set, or that team philosophy is messing up my head.  
    The talk about "transition" is abstract theorizing that explains nothing in particular."  It doesn't even supply a strong hint towards understanding how the Sox have played this year.
      

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Expitch - we all have to be a little mental to care so much.

      :o)
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from harness. Show harness's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    I already mentioned that the subject of transition was being discussed on Moon's Realistic thread. It can have a wide-reaching effect.

    Boston approach to hitting is to work counts. That's been the team approach for years. They scout players with this ability, and it is reflective in most of the at bats in every game.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from expitch. Show expitch's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    I read the "realistic" post.  I'm not sure what it means in "It can have a wide-reaching effect."  That post speculated on the basis of theory, and was vague
    ( more aggressive ) about the actual consequences of a changed approach to hitting.
    If a team's approach is to work pitch counts, you'd think that batters would swing at fewer not more bad pitches.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from harness. Show harness's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Well, here's an example: The team historically has been station-to-station.
    Now they are more athletic. Never have they had a tandem like Crawbury.
    Hitters hitting with them on base are now more involved in the potential steal/hit n'run, etc. - the approach may be leaning more to small-ball in many instances.
    "Do I give Jake a shot at 2nd and take?"
    Ells: "Do I let the hitter swing at a likely fastball on the first pitch?"

    Perhaps the focus isn't strictly on just hitting.
    This is just one small example.

    As for working counts, it's a cat n' mouse game. And it's becoming more difficult as plate discipline is now compromised by umps calling a wider strike zone. This definitely affects hitting.
    Did you see Pelo's post on the Realistic thread discussing how the over-all league averages have dropped significantly?

    Hitting is both mental and physical eye-to-ball co-ordination. You could say Pedey is having severe mental lapses at the plate. That's just another way of saying he's slumping. He's 'in-between'. His mechanics are off...

    What did you think about the mental lapses from MN today?
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from expitch. Show expitch's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    I know what you're getting at. I don't care about the Twins' lapses. Or those of any other team.  
    The citizens of a small town complain to the city council that the crime rate has risen. A council member points out that the crime rate is even worse in a town forty miles up the road.  A citizen says, "So what. We live here." Thus it is for me with mental mistakes.  
    Players themselves say that hitting slumps are mostly mental. ( "I got into the habit of doing or not doing.... I lost my concentration." ) The mind is not giving the body the right directions. Coordination and timing go out of whack
    ( See what Gonzalez says about timing and what he had to think to correct 
    his. )
    The physical equipment is not changed.  Or the mind is thinking too much. Or the beginning of a slump eats at confidence and matters worsen.  The mental problems are the cause of the slumping.  So saying that a man is slumping is a short way of saying that his head is not right, especially when he's hacking at so many bad pitches ( One poster gives numbers showing that the Sox this year are swinging at a notably nigher percentage of pitches out of the strike zone. )   Why this happens to even the best hitters is inexplicable -- but is an indicator of how difficult batting is and why slumps occur if the head is even a little off.  
    There could be several reasons why league averages are dipping. Are all umps using a wider strike zone? I haven't noticed that particularly in games involving the Angels, Dodgers, and teams that are covered by Fox on Saturdays. Less juice in the batters and better arms on the pitchers might certainly account for fewer hard-hit balls.   
    Sox batters may take a few more pitchers now that there are two sets of great wheels on the club.  But at the plate a man is essentially on his own most of the time. A general team approach may influence how he bats at times but not determine it. His batting style is regulated basically by anatomical machinery. The style may be tweaked or adjustments made, but always within a set of natural determinants as they have been cultivated by training and experience.  So when I hear talk of "changing the approach," I have questions about both "change," which implies to me more than tweaking, and about "approach,"  which means to me how a man usually goes about his business.  Too much messing with either one is a sure way to mess up the head. ( That's what pitchers try to do. )  Fine, "now you'll bunt" or "take a pitch when Ells is running" or "hit to the right side to move the runner along" -- these have always been part of the game. ( Substitute any other name for Ellsbury's at any point in the history of the game. )  But I don't think that a "new approach" will radically affect how Boston's hitters behave at the plate day in and day out -- nor should it.    
      
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from expitch. Show expitch's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Harness, you mention small ball. I doubt that there will much of it to speak of as long as the Sox play half their games at Fenway and have three slow-footed power hitters in the middle of the lineup. Nor are the other players, with the exception of Crawford and Ellsbury, known for speed. The Sox may ( may ) play a little more small ball on the road but not if they fall behind, when the rule is that you don't play for one run or to tie.  
    If they don't resign Papi, they'll probably look for a right-handed power bat to replace him, someone not with good wheels either.  
    Theo is looking for a more balanced lineup than Boston has traditionally put on the field.  But I doubt that the shift will be much in the direction away from power.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from harness. Show harness's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Your allusion to crime waves is very pertinent. Not to get off-subject, but crime rates are dependant on populous, geographical locale, etc. In other words, a certain % is expected, as it reflects social upbringing and human nature.

    If a small town sees a sudden rise, obviously, you look into the individual cases for any common pattern. Beyond that, there may be other reasons which are reflective of the national rate. This is where comparisons are extremely useful. The Twins played like sh*t yesterday, yet they are a fundamental organization.
    It happens, because this game is played on the human level, and humans are imperfect.

    If it happens on a consistent basis, like the rise in crime in a small town, it has to be compared to other teams to see where they stand. Then it can be addressed by looking into each situation. Is there a pattern? Is it the poor coaching? Is it individual based on poor performance due to "mental lapses"in the past?

    Losing breeds bad habits, as players try to do too much and end up coming outside of their game. In addition, while the game is both mental & physical, human error has to be expected on both fronts.

    To discuss "mental lapses" in general is one thing. To break it down means I need to see each one you are referring to. I have MLB, so if you can pinpoint the ones in question (game, inning and description of each), it would be helpful. I'm willing to bet there were several circumstances surrounding many of them.

    I also want to commend you on a good, kind-hearted discussion.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    They take too many good pitches and swing at too many bad ones.

    What did you base this on?  It looks to me like they are #5 out of 30 in K/W ratio.

    Their defensive alignments do not always appear thought out.

    What does this mean?  Are you talking where Youk positions himself, or the fact that he plays 3rd.  I'm thinking this is not a measurable category.

    They are too often overtaken by events.

    Again, I have no idea what this means.  What specific event overtook them?  This really just like a collection of random unproveable thoughts.
     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from billsrul. Show billsrul's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    I tried to create a thread about the plate discipline part of this, but it didn't really take off.  Anyways, Sox plate discipline is much worse than its been in previous years.  I think the strike zone difference (this is more of something I've thought I've noticed during games) has caused this.  And in fact, I think I saw an article somewhere actually proving that the strike zone has become a bit wider in baseball (not much change in height but magically the plate has become wider on both sides).  I think it's having a mental effect on sox hitters....
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from harness. Show harness's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Its definitely affected Drew last year.
    Some of those outside calls against him were insane.
     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Item number two is signing Crawford over Jason Werth. No doubt the Sox had the resources to get Werth, getting outmanuevered by Washington is surprising,

    Outmanuevered?  Werth's contract might go down as one of the worst in history.  The Nats are paying Werth like $18M to be playing at age 38.  Yup, really outsmarted us on that one.
     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bosoxl94l. Show Bosoxl94l's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    Another BS Thread.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from expitch. Show expitch's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    In Response to Re: Mental Lapses:
    They take too many good pitches and swing at too many bad ones. What did you base this on?  It looks to me like they are #5 out of 30 in K/W ratio. Their defensive alignments do not always appear thought out. What does this mean?  Are you talking where Youk positions himself, or the fact that he plays 3rd.  I'm thinking this is not a measurable category. They are too often overtaken by events. Again, I have no idea what this means.  What specific event overtook them?  This really just like a collection of random unproveable thoughts.
    Posted by Joebreidey
    My observations may seem "random" from a stat viewpoint, but they form clearly discernible patterns that, I might add, I am scarcely alone in noticing.
    If you think that stats "prove" anything, you need a crash course in scientific method. At best most stats are suggestive and most are open to various interpretations. ( Note, I didn't say all stats in all conditions. )  At least that is what I was told by people who taught me.
    With respect to noticing, you seem to have missed my clearly stated point about how Youk is positioned.  I said nothing about his being the third baseman. Why did you ask? 
    Perhaps you don't read my analyses carefully because they fail your MO test.
    You do it your way. I do it mine.  
    The Sox have been distinguished this season by, among other things, leaving runners in scoring position.  They blow these opportunities, then are "overtaken by events" when the other club outscores them.  Lack of readiness or missed opportunities create a vulnerability to fall victim to events. And not just in baseball.   
     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from softlawRS. Show softlawRS's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    expitch knows his stuff. Harness and Joe do not.
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from softlawRS. Show softlawRS's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    expitch knows his stuff. Harness and Joe do not.
     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from expitch. Show expitch's posts

    Re: Mental Lapses

    In Response to Re: Mental Lapses:
    Your allusion to crime waves is very pertinent. Not to get off-subject, but crime rates are dependant on populous, geographical locale, etc. In other words, a certain % is expected, as it reflects social upbringing and human nature. If a small town sees a sudden rise, obviously, you look into the individual cases for any common pattern. Beyond that, there may be other reasons which are reflective of the national rate. This is where comparisons are extremely useful. The Twins played like sh*t yesterday, yet they are a fundamental organization. It happens, because this game is played on the human level, and humans are imperfect. If it happens on a consistent basis, like the rise in crime in a small town, it has to be compared to other teams to see where they stand. Then it can be addressed by looking into each situation. Is there a pattern? Is it the poor coaching? Is it individual based on poor performance due to " mental lapses "in the past? Losing breeds bad habits, as players try to do too much and end up coming outside of their game. In addition, while the game is both mental & physical, human error has to be expected on both fronts. To discuss "mental lapses" in general is one thing. To break it down means I need to see each one you are referring to. I have MLB, so if you can pinpoint the ones in question (game, inning and description of each), it would be helpful. I'm willing to bet there were several circumstances surrounding many of them. I also want to commend you on a good, kind-hearted discussion.
    Posted by harness
    The people in that small town will not be mollified by systematic criminology. But, as I've said, I'm more than willing to consider a scale by which to measure the comparative instance of mental mistakes across baseball. I've already said that I don't keep the kind of record you request. ( I try work meals and sleep into a day. ) I'm reporting impressions that may be rejected out of hand for one reason or other ( unreliable MO in someone's else's opinion ), taken under serious consideration on their merits, or largely confirmed by someone with similar observations.  I try explain ( not "prove" ) these observations. I have no control over reactions to either the observations or the explanations. 
    On a positive note, tonight the "kid" ( unlike Lowrie a few games ago ) stationed himself properly and read Crawford's hit correctly. Good baserunning won the game. Pay attention, veterans.  "And a child shall teach them."
    These exchanges are fun, old pen pal. ( Old, you understand, is not to be taken literally. )  I respect what you have to say.  But I think this subject has been drained dry for the time being. 

     
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