Money Ball: The Movie

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    Money Ball: The Movie

    Comming this fall, anyone going?

    Thoughts?
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from attic-dan. Show attic-dan's posts

    Re: Money Ball: The Movie

      I found the book enlightning, hope movie is half as good, and who is going to play 'Youkilis the god of walks'.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from SpacemanEephus. Show SpacemanEephus's posts

    Re: Money Ball: The Movie

    In Response to Re: Money Ball: The Movie:
    [QUOTE]  I found the book enlightning, hope movie is half as good, and who is going to play 'Youkilis the god of walks'.
    Posted by attic-dan[/QUOTE]

    I like how you left out 'Greek' to avoid a forum meltdown again.  very tactful.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Yoshimi25. Show Yoshimi25's posts

    Re: Money Ball: The Movie

    I enjoyed the book.  I will more than likely go to see the movie. 
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from attic-dan. Show attic-dan's posts

    Re: Money Ball: The Movie

    In Response to Re: Money Ball: The Movie:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Money Ball: The Movie : I like how you left out 'Greek' to avoid a forum meltdown again.  very tactful.
    Posted by SpacemanEephus[/QUOTE]

      I've been censored a couple of times allready with what I thought were completly innocous terms, feels like when my mother told me not to use dirty words. So now I tone down my rhetoric and not use terms in the purjourative, nice catch BTW.
     
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    Re: Money Ball: The Movie

    The book is essential reading for anybody that wants to understand how today's GMs operate and will give you more of a sense of some of what guides the Red Sox  in the John Henry/Theo era. 

    Just as interesting as the book are some of the follow up interviews with author Michael Lewis.  Lewis mentions that Billy Beane was not concerned about baseball people reading the book because of their narrow vision of baseball and the fact that they were not likely to read anything anyway.  What Beane didn't anticipate is that the owners and stake holders of baseball teams would read the book and begin to apply the ideas by restructuring management.  

    Like all works, I find that a lot of what is in the book is misinterpreted by some stat geeks who have created an orthodoxy around some of the newfangled stats like OPS and WHIP, just like traditional baseball fans are tied to stats like batting average and ERA.  While useful, I don't think Lewis or Beane implied that the numbers are the only gauges used in evaluating talent and that the process is not fixed, but ever evolving.  In addition, anybody using stats, new or old, knows that they're not meaningful outside of a full context of the situation.

    In the book, the Sabermetrics stuff is interwoven within the story of Billy Beane himself and his career.  Beane ironically was the antithesis of the type of player that he sought out as a general manager.  While I probably will see the movie, I have minimal expectations, but I'm hoping that the story will convey this interesting paradox of a highly athletic 5-tool phenom prospect and failure seeking out bad-bodied baseball misfits who have successful major league careers. 
     
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    Re: Money Ball: The Movie

    In Response to Re: Money Ball: The Movie:
    [QUOTE]  I found the book enlightning, hope movie is half as good, and who is going to play 'Youkilis the god of walks'.
    Posted by attic-dan[/QUOTE]

    tor johnson.
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: Money Ball: The Movie

    I'm more concerned with enjoying the "game" of baseball than being "entertained" by the "business" of baseball.

    Would anyone be interested in a biography of Clint Eastwood that focused on how he balances his checkbook and how he shops for clothing, groceries and insurance?
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from BS10FAN. Show BS10FAN's posts

    Re: Money Ball: The Movie

    I recommend reading the books first..the author is Michael Lewis..also the book the "The Big Short" will explain exactly what happened with the banking crisis..he is a great writer..
     
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  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from harness. Show harness's posts

    Re: Money Ball: The Movie

    In Response to Re: Money Ball: The Movie:
    [QUOTE]The book is essential reading for anybody that wants to understand how today's GMs operate and will give you more of a sense of some of what guides the Red Sox  in the John Henry/Theo era.  Just as interesting as the book are some of the follow up interviews with author Michael Lewis.  Lewis mentions that Billy Beane was not concerned about baseball people reading the book because of their narrow vision of baseball and the fact that they were not likely to read anything anyway.  What Beane didn't anticipate is that the owners and stake holders of baseball teams would read the book and begin to apply the ideas by restructuring management.   Like all works, I find that a lot of what is in the book is misinterpreted by some stat geeks who have created an orthodoxy around some of the newfangled stats like OPS and WHIP, just like traditional baseball fans are tied to stats like batting average and ERA.  While useful, I don't think Lewis or Beane implied that the numbers are the only gauges used in evaluating talent and that the process is not fixed, but ever evolving.  In addition, anybody using stats, new or old, knows that they're not meaningful outside of a full context of the situation. In the book, the Sabermetrics stuff is interwoven within the story of Billy Beane himself and his career.  Beane ironically was the antithesis of the type of player that he sought out as a general manager.  While I probably will see the movie, I have minimal expectations, but I'm hoping that the story will convey this interesting paradox of a highly athletic 5-tool phenom prospect and failure seeking out bad-bodied baseball misfits who have successful major league careers. 
    Posted by Sheriff-Rojas[/QUOTE]

    Actually, stats like WHIP & OPS & BABIP are no longer considered 'new-fangle'.
    The are the adopted norm, to accompany conventional mode.
    New fangled would involve segregated stats like FIP/FIP-Siera, etc.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from sindarin-erebor. Show sindarin-erebor's posts

    Re: Money Ball: The Movie

    No. I find the "business" of baseball distasteful, although obviously a reality I must endure. I long for the days gone by when $$ was not such a huge part of the game.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Money Ball: The Movie

    I always liked OPS# allowed, ERC# or ERC+ for P myself; but that's about as fancy as I get. For hitting, I prefer OBP# for the first 2 spots in the order, and OPS# afterwards. Defensive metrics are still problematic, but for me it's usually a mix of RF and FPct, and CS% for C. I still don't trust the ZR; too many supposedly great fielders didn't fare well; ditto overall for WAR, but I'm warming up to it. There are still so many facets of defense still not very well figured out; how to measure throwing out runners from the IF and OF, relays, plays at the plate, etc. Oh, and I forget to mention CERA!
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: Money Ball: The Movie

    I didn't read the book, and I, admittedly, don't even know the story. But I'm assuming that anyone who read the book will be surprised by how things change in the writing of the movie. But that's Hollywood.

     
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