Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from MadMc44. Show MadMc44's posts

    Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    I'm very picky but watch Nap when he swings--especially swings and misses he appears to be looking to CF--he does not watch the ball hit the bat. He has a titanic swing,  watch him during his next at bat. If he watches the ball his head and shoulders would be forced to close on the ball and he would be driving the ball to center and right, his natural power alley.

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from dustcover. Show dustcover's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    In response to MadMc44's comment:

    I'm very picky but watch Nap when he swings--especially swings and misses he appears to be looking to CF--he does not watch the ball hit the bat. He has a titanic swing,  watch him during his next at bat. If he watches the ball his head and shoulders would be forced to close on the ball and he would be driving the ball to center and right, his natural power alley.

     



    You're absolutely right.  His eyes do not follow the ball through contact.  He peeks, and when he does, his left shoulder and left side opens up, causing him to often whiff. He has more swings and misses than any hitter that I can remember.  He's been doing it all season and I'm convinced that if he would stay down and through the ball, he would make more consistent contact and significantly cut down on his K's.  But I fear he has had this swing and penchant for power his entire career and is not about to change.  After all, this is what he is being paid for.  The Sox knew exactly what they were getting when they signed him.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from TheExaminer. Show TheExaminer's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    In response to dustcover's comment:

     

    In response to MadMc44's comment:

     

     

     

    I'm very picky but watch Nap when he swings--especially swings and misses he appears to be looking to CF--he does not watch the ball hit the bat. He has a titanic swing,  watch him during his next at bat. If he watches the ball his head and shoulders would be forced to close on the ball and he would be driving the ball to center and right, his natural power alley.

     

     

     



    You're absolutely right.  His eyes do not follow the ball through contact.  He peeks, and when he does, his left shoulder and left side opens up, causing him to often whiff. He has more swings and misses than any hitter that I can remember.  He's been doing it all season and I'm convinced that if he would stay down and through the ball, he would make more consistent contact and significantly cut down on his K's.  But I fear he has had this swing and penchant for power his entire career and is not about to change.  After all, this is what he is being paid for.  The Sox knew exactly what they were getting when they signed him.

     

     

     



    Its obvious to even the casual observer that his head is coming off the ball and his shoulder is flying open leaving him unable to reach the high or outside pitch. Why is it not corrected by the coaches, and if they have attemted to do so, why is he not listening? I do not understand these things, but I am just a boy.

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from georom4. Show georom4's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    i am wary of any MLB player being told to "change" his swing...they made it this far and i can see some minor changes to shorten their swing a bit at certain times but telling a ballplayer his swing is all wrong? let them be - even the best fail 7/10 times

    As always - 100% correct!

     
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    In response to georom4's comment:

    i am wary of any MLB player being told to "change" his swing...they made it this far and i can see some minor changes to shorten their swing a bit at certain times but telling a ballplayer his swing is all wrong? let them be - even the best fail 7/10 times

    As always - 100% correct!

     



    Spot on.  I remember went Beltre went hitless for 2-3 games with us.  People were posting that he can't hit an outside curve.  It couldn't be more obvious that, if he couldn't hit an outside curve, pitchers would've realized that in second game, and he'd be in the minors in about his 3rd game.  He hadn't just been hiding it for 10 seasons.

    Anyway, I teach my kids that you should be able to see what part of the ball you hit, and you should always follow the ball to the mitt, when you don't swing.

    But that also impacts power.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from donrd4. Show donrd4's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    In response to MadMc44's comment:

    I'm very picky but watch Nap when he swings--especially swings and misses he appears to be looking to CF--he does not watch the ball hit the bat. He has a titanic swing,  watch him during his next at bat. If he watches the ball his head and shoulders would be forced to close on the ball and he would be driving the ball to center and right, his natural power alley.

     



    If i was batting i would be looking to CF unless the pitcher as throwing from first or third. The sox didn't get Naps to hit to center or right . He was a pull hitter at fenway for many years and sox were hopeing he would continue to hit that wall. Just strikes out way to much,

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from donrd4. Show donrd4's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    In response to dustcover's comment:

    In response to MadMc44's comment:
    [QUOTE]

     

    I'm very picky but watch Nap when he swings--especially swings and misses he appears to be looking to CF--he does not watch the ball hit the bat. He has a titanic swing,  watch him during his next at bat. If he watches the ball his head and shoulders would be forced to close on the ball and he would be driving the ball to center and right, his natural power alley.

     

     



    You're absolutely right.  His eyes do not follow the ball through contact.  He peeks, and when he does, his left shoulder and left side opens up, causing him to often whiff. He has more swings and misses than any hitter that I can remember.  He's been doing it all season and I'm convinced that if he would stay down and through the ball, he would make more consistent contact and significantly cut down on his K's.  But I fear he has had this swing and penchant for power his entire career and is not about to change.  After all, this is what he is being paid for.  The Sox knew exactly what they were getting when they signed him.

    Easier said then done. This isn't little Joey tossing balls to the plate. Ilike when guys on here know all the fixes to any player who knows way way more then we do.Do you think Sox are sitting back and only wish they knew as much as you do about hitting. Hitting a baseball at close to 95+ mph with only second to react is no easy feat. They are Pros and do make ajustments, just not as easy as you make it out to be. Im convinced you will never lose your day job to become hitting coach. I'm no better then you ,but i do know we don't have a clue .Thats we are watching from the couch.... But if you did coach little joey your not alone. But it's nice to think we have the answers.

    [/QUOTE]


     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from 86redsox. Show 86redsox's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    He's got a softball swing.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from southpaw777. Show southpaw777's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    In response to 86redsox's comment:

    He's got a softball swing.

     

     

     

     

     

     




    This is what I was thinking. hed be my 1st pick in the beer leagueSealed

    With that said, hes right about at his career averages. A couple above, a couple below, but basically right where he was expected to be.

     

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from donrd4. Show donrd4's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    In response to 86redsox's comment:

    He's got a softball swing.

     

     Ha Ha ... I played softball for 38 years .... I've seen different types of swings in that short time. Whats a softball swing? There are different ways to hit a softball. The best way is whats best for you. I've seen upper cuts and i've seen nice smooth level swings, over the top works also( if you have good speed) You can also ajust your swing to the situtation. There are so many ways to hit a softball  so to say it's a softball swing?.....Then again if your only playing softball to go have a few beers then you could have ( just a softball swing ) ...Thats ok ... it's fun.....Really miss it !

     

     

     

     




     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from dustcover. Show dustcover's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    In response to donrd4's comment:

     

    In response to dustcover's comment:

     

    In response to MadMc44's comment:

     

     

    I'm very picky but watch Nap when he swings--especially swings and misses he appears to be looking to CF--he does not watch the ball hit the bat. He has a titanic swing,  watch him during his next at bat. If he watches the ball his head and shoulders would be forced to close on the ball and he would be driving the ball to center and right, his natural power alley.

     

     

     



    You're absolutely right.  His eyes do not follow the ball through contact.  He peeks, and when he does, his left shoulder and left side opens up, causing him to often whiff. He has more swings and misses than any hitter that I can remember.  He's been doing it all season and I'm convinced that if he would stay down and through the ball, he would make more consistent contact and significantly cut down on his K's.  But I fear he has had this swing and penchant for power his entire career and is not about to change.  After all, this is what he is being paid for.  The Sox knew exactly what they were getting when they signed him.

     

    Easier said then done. This isn't little Joey tossing balls to the plate. Ilike when guys on here know all the fixes to any player who knows way way more then we do.Do you think Sox are sitting back and only wish they knew as much as you do about hitting. Hitting a baseball at close to 95+ mph with only second to react is no easy feat. They are Pros and do make ajustments, just not as easy as you make it out to be. Im convinced you will never lose your day job to become hitting coach. I'm no better then you ,but i do know we don't have a clue .Thats we are watching from the couch.... But if you did coach little joey your not alone. But it's nice to think we have the answers.

     




     

    Your response is just one of the reasons why those who post their opinions on this forum, like MadMc44 and myself, to engage in a friendly baseball discussion, do so rarely.

    "I like when guys on here know all the fixes to any player who knows way more then we do."

    Are we not entitled to an opinion?

    "Hitting a baseball at close to 95+ mph with only second to react is no easy feat. They are Pros and do make adjustments, just not as easy as you make it out to be."

     Never said nor implied that it was.

    "I'm convinced you will never lose your day job to become hitting coach."

     Total agreement there. The chance of that happening is about even with that of you're being invited into a friendly dialogue of baseball observations.

     "I'm no better then you, but i do know we don't have a clue."

    That's quite an assertion considering you know next to nothing about me.

    "But if you did coach little joey....

    A bit condescending wouldn’t you say?

    "But it's nice to think we have the answers."

    I’ll be the first to admit that I don’t have all the answers, but I’ll stick to my opinion and concur with MadMc44 that Napoli does not keep his head down and his eye on the ball throughout his swing. In contrast, just recently during the Yankee series, the camera did a close up, slow motion view of one of Cano’s swings and it was a thing of beauty, much like that of Ted Williams so many years ago.

    Now I’m not suggesting that Napoli can duplicate nor become the hitter that Cano is, but one can certainly see the difference in the swing pattern. As in golf, one of the earliest tenets in baseball of hitting the ball is to keep your head down, eye on the ball, and swing through the ball. Peeking inevitably results in not making solid contact.

    That’s my opinion, and I’m sticking to it. Which opinion, by the way, is supported in "The Art of Hitting" by Tony Gwinn, "The Science of Hitting" by Ted Williams, "Lau’s Laws On Hitting" by Charlie Lau, and "The Louisville Slugger® Complete Book of Hitting Faults and Fixes : How to Detect and Correct the 50 Most Common Mistakes at the Plate" by John Monteleone.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from donrd4. Show donrd4's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    In response to dustcover's comment:

    In response to donrd4's comment:

     

    In response to dustcover's comment:

     

    In response to MadMc44's comment:

     

     

    I'm very picky but watch Nap when he swings--especially swings and misses he appears to be looking to CF--he does not watch the ball hit the bat. He has a titanic swing,  watch him during his next at bat. If he watches the ball his head and shoulders would be forced to close on the ball and he would be driving the ball to center and right, his natural power alley.

     

     

     



    You're absolutely right.  His eyes do not follow the ball through contact.  He peeks, and when he does, his left shoulder and left side opens up, causing him to often whiff. He has more swings and misses than any hitter that I can remember.  He's been doing it all season and I'm convinced that if he would stay down and through the ball, he would make more consistent contact and significantly cut down on his K's.  But I fear he has had this swing and penchant for power his entire career and is not about to change.  After all, this is what he is being paid for.  The Sox knew exactly what they were getting when they signed him.

     

    Easier said then done. This isn't little Joey tossing balls to the plate. Ilike when guys on here know all the fixes to any player who knows way way more then we do.Do you think Sox are sitting back and only wish they knew as much as you do about hitting. Hitting a baseball at close to 95+ mph with only second to react is no easy feat. They are Pros and do make ajustments, just not as easy as you make it out to be. Im convinced you will never lose your day job to become hitting coach. I'm no better then you ,but i do know we don't have a clue .Thats we are watching from the couch.... But if you did coach little joey your not alone. But it's nice to think we have the answers.

     




     

    Your response is just one of the reasons why those who post their opinions on this forum, like MadMc44 and myself, to engage in a friendly baseball discussion, do so rarely.

    "I like when guys on here know all the fixes to any player who knows way more then we do."

    Are we not entitled to an opinion?

    "Hitting a baseball at close to 95+ mph with only second to react is no easy feat. They are Pros and do make adjustments, just not as easy as you make it out to be."

     Never said nor implied that it was.

    "I'm convinced you will never lose your day job to become hitting coach."

     Total agreement there. The chance of that happening is about even with that of you're being invited into a friendly dialogue of baseball observations.

     "I'm no better then you, but i do know we don't have a clue."

    That's quite an assertion considering you know next to nothing about me.

    "But if you did coach little joey....

    A bit condescending wouldn’t you say?

    "But it's nice to think we have the answers."

    I’ll be the first to admit that I don’t have all the answers, but I’ll stick to my opinion and concur with MadMc44 that Napoli does not keep his head down and his eye on the ball throughout his swing. In contrast, just recently during the Yankee series, the camera did a close up, slow motion view of one of Cano’s swings and it was a thing of beauty, much like that of Ted Williams so many years ago.

    Now I’m not suggesting that Napoli can duplicate nor become the hitter that Cano is, but one can certainly see the difference in the swing pattern. As in golf, one of the earliest tenets in baseball of hitting the ball is to keep your head down, eye on the ball, and swing through the ball. Peeking inevitably results in not making solid contact.

    That’s my opinion, and I’m sticking to it. Which opinion, by the way, is supported in "The Art of Hitting" by Tony Gwinn, "The Science of Hitting" by Ted Williams, "Lau’s Laws On Hitting" by Charlie Lau, and "The Louisville Slugger® Complete Book of Hitting Faults and Fixes : How to Detect and Correct the 50 Most Common Mistakes at the Plate" by John Monteleone.



    Sorry about what i said. I thought you had your opinion .Ididn't know you were telling us about your book reading. Should have said i read a book and in that book they said.....My fault. So what it boils down to is the sox hitting coach should read those books and could be as smart as you as to why Naps looks like he's looking in center field intstead of looking at pitcher. ( Where ever that pitcher might be standing) Do this ... Stand in front of mirror ... See that guy? He's the pitcher... Would center field be behind you? Where else would you be looking? Don't think that   your baseball for dummies book would even have that in it.By the way whose books you mentioned are very good .Please just forget about that stupid remark about eyes on centerfield and you should be just fine......

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from MadMc44. Show MadMc44's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    Dusty thanks for the support--don you have your  opinion as we all do; I like talking hitting and I liked that sweet Cano swing, eye on the ball, the whole bit.

    Nap has been pretty successful--someone making $13 M a year has been doing a lot right for a few years. Just watching him bat and seeing the number of K's( yes I know the stats, most batters are going to fail 6 of 10 at bats and who cares whether it's a K, fly, or ground out). That may be so but we all know the ramifications of not making contact. 

    I do enjoy our Sox and when I posted this I was thinking of Nap looking straight ahead and not watching the ball. We all know he can hit the ball out of every park including Acadia. He sees 90 to 95 MPH fastballs everyday can you imagine how much better he would be if he actually watched the ball and drove it.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from dustcover. Show dustcover's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    In response to donrd4's comment:

    In response to dustcover's comment:

     

    In response to donrd4's comment:

     

    In response to dustcover's comment:

     

    In response to MadMc44's comment:

     

     

    I'm very picky but watch Nap when he swings--especially swings and misses he appears to be looking to CF--he does not watch the ball hit the bat. He has a titanic swing,  watch him during his next at bat. If he watches the ball his head and shoulders would be forced to close on the ball and he would be driving the ball to center and right, his natural power alley.

     

     

     



    You're absolutely right.  His eyes do not follow the ball through contact.  He peeks, and when he does, his left shoulder and left side opens up, causing him to often whiff. He has more swings and misses than any hitter that I can remember.  He's been doing it all season and I'm convinced that if he would stay down and through the ball, he would make more consistent contact and significantly cut down on his K's.  But I fear he has had this swing and penchant for power his entire career and is not about to change.  After all, this is what he is being paid for.  The Sox knew exactly what they were getting when they signed him.

     

    Easier said then done. This isn't little Joey tossing balls to the plate. Ilike when guys on here know all the fixes to any player who knows way way more then we do.Do you think Sox are sitting back and only wish they knew as much as you do about hitting. Hitting a baseball at close to 95+ mph with only second to react is no easy feat. They are Pros and do make ajustments, just not as easy as you make it out to be. Im convinced you will never lose your day job to become hitting coach. I'm no better then you ,but i do know we don't have a clue .Thats we are watching from the couch.... But if you did coach little joey your not alone. But it's nice to think we have the answers.

     




     

    Your response is just one of the reasons why those who post their opinions on this forum, like MadMc44 and myself, to engage in a friendly baseball discussion, do so rarely.

    "I like when guys on here know all the fixes to any player who knows way more then we do."

    Are we not entitled to an opinion?

    "Hitting a baseball at close to 95+ mph with only second to react is no easy feat. They are Pros and do make adjustments, just not as easy as you make it out to be."

     Never said nor implied that it was.

    "I'm convinced you will never lose your day job to become hitting coach."

     Total agreement there. The chance of that happening is about even with that of you're being invited into a friendly dialogue of baseball observations.

     "I'm no better then you, but i do know we don't have a clue."

    That's quite an assertion considering you know next to nothing about me.

    "But if you did coach little joey....

    A bit condescending wouldn’t you say?

    "But it's nice to think we have the answers."

    I’ll be the first to admit that I don’t have all the answers, but I’ll stick to my opinion and concur with MadMc44 that Napoli does not keep his head down and his eye on the ball throughout his swing. In contrast, just recently during the Yankee series, the camera did a close up, slow motion view of one of Cano’s swings and it was a thing of beauty, much like that of Ted Williams so many years ago.

    Now I’m not suggesting that Napoli can duplicate nor become the hitter that Cano is, but one can certainly see the difference in the swing pattern. As in golf, one of the earliest tenets in baseball of hitting the ball is to keep your head down, eye on the ball, and swing through the ball. Peeking inevitably results in not making solid contact.

    That’s my opinion, and I’m sticking to it. Which opinion, by the way, is supported in "The Art of Hitting" by Tony Gwinn, "The Science of Hitting" by Ted Williams, "Lau’s Laws On Hitting" by Charlie Lau, and "The Louisville Slugger® Complete Book of Hitting Faults and Fixes : How to Detect and Correct the 50 Most Common Mistakes at the Plate" by John Monteleone.

     



    Sorry about what i said. I thought you had your opinion .Ididn't know you were telling us about your book reading. Should have said i read a book and in that book they said.....My fault. So what it boils down to is the sox hitting coach should read those books and could be as smart as you as to why Naps looks like he's looking in center field intstead of looking at pitcher. ( Where ever that pitcher might be standing) Do this ... Stand in front of mirror ... See that guy? He's the pitcher... Would center field be behind you? Where else would you be looking? Don't think that   your baseball for dummies book would even have that in it.By the way whose books you mentioned are very good .Please just forget about that stupid remark about eyes on centerfield and you should be just fine......

     



    Nah, what I should have said was "Thank you and good night Gracie."

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from dgalehouse. Show dgalehouse's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    As a rule, it is better to keep your head still when trying to hit a baseball , golf ball , cue ball , etc. One can still have success without following this rule, but it is usually better to abide by it. Napoli has a lot of power, but he could well be a better hitter if he had better fundamentals. Anyway, it is too late to change now. What you see is what you will get. 

    Stabbed by Foulke.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from MadMc44. Show MadMc44's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    Nap after Sunday's game with the D'Backs---went 0 for 5 with three k"s.

    Nap currently has a K batting average of .384

    Nap's current reg. BA is a respectable .256

    http://weei.stats.com/mlb/playerstats.asp?id=8512&fn=Mike&ln=Carp&team=02&p=F

    Some info on Carp not including todays game.

    ************************************

    I guess if JF and BenC are willing to accept his K's you will not see Nap dropped in the order or Nap benched. Watching him at the plate I am thinking how many pitches will it take for the opposing pitcher to strike Nap out. Nap seldom swings at the 1 st pitch so he's down to a potential 3 pitch K.

    Good luck Nap--you have exceeded your historical personal K number. Perhaps the hip is causing more trouble when he bats than when he plays the field.

     
  17. This post has been removed.

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from bosox0489. Show bosox0489's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    In response to MadMc44's comment:

    I'm very picky but watch Nap when he swings--especially swings and misses he appears to be looking to CF--he does not watch the ball hit the bat. He has a titanic swing,  watch him during his next at bat. If he watches the ball his head and shoulders would be forced to close on the ball and he would be driving the ball to center and right, his natural power alley.

     




     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from bosox0489. Show bosox0489's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.


    If napoli should get a hit it is not the result of some effort on his part. He cant hit the god dam   

     

    ball.  the ball for some inscrutable reason hits the bat.

     

                                                              stevebosox46   semper fi

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from pumpsie-green. Show pumpsie-green's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    In response to southpaw777's comment:

    In response to 86redsox's comment:

     

    He's got a softball swing.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     




    This is what I was thinking. hed be my 1st pick in the beer leagueSealed

     

    With that said, hes right about at his career averages. A couple above, a couple below, but basically right where he was expected to be.

     



    His OPS for the year is 47 points below his career average, and dropping.

     
  21. This post has been removed.

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from MadMc44. Show MadMc44's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    For  some strange reason the ball isn't hitting the bat anymore.

    He's not even hitting any loud outs or long foul balls when he does make contact.

    More teams will be walking Ortiz to get to Nap which would be a smart move. Until he goes back to hitting 101: Watch the ball, hit the ball we are going to see a lot more K's. He's on track for an added 100 K's in the next 50 games, which would bring him close to 250 for the season.

    Mark Bellhorn currently holds the Sox record at 177. Here's a list of major league all time K leaders:

    http://www.baseball-almanac.com/hitting/histrk2.shtml

    Mark Reynolds all time 223. Will JF continue to allow him to get closer and closer to Reynolds? He should easily eclipse Bellhorn--he only needs 34 more.

     
  23. This post has been removed.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from charliedarling. Show charliedarling's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    Those who mention that Napoli's head is not staying on the ball long enough are exactly right.  He appears to try to hit every ball 500 feet with every swing. 

    I do not agree with the posters who say that this problem cannot be fixed.  In fact, it is a fairly easily correctable situation.  Fixing the moving head will result in a week of less power, but Napoli has already made himself almost powerless for quite a while now.  There a bunch of hitting drills that players at all levels can to to correct this problem.

    Getting the head to stay still will also cut back on the staggering number of strike outs that are hurting the offense quite a bit lately.


     

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from MadMc44. Show MadMc44's posts

    Re: Nap's eyes on Centerfield Camera.

    Belinsky----

    Pitchers want you to look over their shoulder because that way they know you aren't watching the ball hit the bat. I have to give credit where credit is due---he is battibg .256--that's pretty good for someone who doesn't watch the ball make contact with the bat. So if Nap gets a hit every four at bats and strikes out the other three times  with the bases juiced in the next 50 games and the Sox win the pennant and neither Ortiz or Nap hit another homer you're okay with that? I'm okay with it but if the Sox finish out of the playoffs---I will be pretty disappointed because if I notice Nap is doing what he's doing and we have two batting coaches, a bench coach a manager and a GM that don't address the issue with him---I say check the game tapes.

    I am going to start watching every batter of every game, Sox or other teams, and I will report back periodically re. who doesn't watch the ball onto the bat.

     

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