nostalgia for '67

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    nostalgia for '67

    For those who might not have been around in '67, this will give you an idea of just how 'tight' the pennant race was that year, and how truly remarkable was the outcome.

    As of the beginning of September — the last month of the season — the Angels had faded from a 5-team dogfight and the Red Sox sat atop of the American League, but were caught in a real battle with Chicago, Minnesota and Detroit.

    The four teams were separated by half a game and all jumped between first to fourth sporadically. The pennant race was coming down to the last weekend of the season.

    Unfortunately for the White Sox, a three-game sweep at the hands of the
    Washington Senators left Chicago three games out of first place and left the pennant scramble a three-team race.

    The Red Sox faced the Twins in a two game series at Fenway Park on that last weekend. The Twins were in first place and were ahead by one game over the Red Sox. The Red Sox had to sweep the Twins to have any opportunity to win the pennant.

    Another variable was that the Detroit Tigers would have to lose one more game.

    Ironically, the Tigers were playing the California Angels. In another twist, the Red Sox
    Carl Yastrzemski was trying to win the triple crown; he led the American League in batting average and RBI, and was tied for the home run lead with Harmon Killebrew
    of the Twins. Both players hit one home run in the series, so "Yaz" won the triple crown.

    In addition, in the two game series Yastrzemski went 7 for 8 with a home run and 6 RBI.

    In the last game of the season, 21 game winner
    Jim Lonborg got the start for the Red Sox vs. the Twins' 20 game winner Dean Chance
    . The Red Sox won the game 5-3 with a 5 run fifth inning, and Lonborg finished the season with 22 victories.

    In Detroit, the Tigers won the first game of a double header vs. the Angels, and needed to win the second game to tie the Red Sox for 1st place. But their bullpen failed, and the Angels'
    Rick Reichardt
    hit a home run in an 8-5 Angel win.

    The Red Sox had won their first American League pennant in 21 years.

     
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    Re: nostalgia for '67

    It was a gut wrenching weekend for us oldies. I was 17 at the time and man watched every game. Then had to wait and listen to the radio for the results in Detroit.
    If I remember correctly if Detroit won it was a one game playoff in Detroit.
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from niz-58. Show niz-58's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    In Response to nostalgia for '67:
    For those who might not have been around in '67, this will give you an idea of just how 'tight' the pennant race was that year, and how truly remarkable was the outcome. As of the beginning of September — the last month of the season — the Angels had faded from a 5-team dogfight and the Red Sox sat atop of the American League, but were caught in a real battle with Chicago, Minnesota and Detroit. The four teams were separated by half a game and all jumped between first to fourth sporadically. The pennant race was coming down to the last weekend of the season. Unfortunately for the White Sox, a three-game sweep at the hands of the Washington Senators left Chicago three games out of first place and left the pennant scramble a three-team race. The Red Sox faced the Twins in a two game series at Fenway Park on that last weekend. The Twins were in first place and were ahead by one game over the Red Sox. The Red Sox had to sweep the Twins to have any opportunity to win the pennant. Another variable was that the Detroit Tigers would have to lose one more game. Ironically, the Tigers were playing the California Angels. In another twist, the Red Sox Carl Yastrzemski was trying to win the triple crown; he led the American League in batting average and RBI, and was tied for the home run lead with Harmon Killebrew of the Twins. Both players hit one home run in the series, so "Yaz" won the triple crown. In addition, in the two game series Yastrzemski went 7 for 8 with a home run and 6 RBI. In the last game of the season, 21 game winner Jim Lonborg got the start for the Red Sox vs. the Twins' 20 game winner Dean Chance . The Red Sox won the game 5-3 with a 5 run fifth inning, and Lonborg finished the season with 22 victories. In Detroit, the Tigers won the first game of a double header vs. the Angels, and needed to win the second game to tie the Red Sox for 1st place. But their bullpen failed, and the Angels' Rick Reichardt hit a home run in an 8-5 Angel win. The Red Sox had won their first American League pennant in 21 years.
    Posted by dustcover


    Thanks for the recap. Being only nine at the time, the details are sketchy for me.
     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    In Response to Re: nostalgia for '67:
    It was a gut wrenching weekend for us oldies. I was 17 at the time and man watched every game. Then had to wait and listen to the radio for the results in Detroit. If I remember correctly if Detroit won it was a one game playoff in Detroit.
    Posted by JimfromFlorida


    yeah Jimmah old friend. 67 was the best summer we ever had man. graduated from high school, course, had to go and register for the draft which sucked. and like all the other 1948's had a real low lottery number which meant the letter was coming. I said the hell with em! I wasn't about to get drafted and end up as an 11bravo (infantry) walking a rice paddy. I went down and enlisted for 4 years to get the school of my choice. and the rest is history. did you tell me that you were in the navy? I can't remember.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from ZILLAGOD. Show ZILLAGOD's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    I actually was only 8 years old, so the Red Sox, the Summer Of Love ( and all the hippie stuff) was taking a backseat to getting through the 4th grade and then doing kid things in the backyard (playing with Tonka Trucks and G.I.Joe, etc.), in fact baseball and Hippies went pretty much unnoticed by myself. It wasn't until I got the 'Impossible Dream' vinyl record and listened to Ken Coleman tell the story of the '67 Red Sox , over and over and over, that I realized what I had missed. I became a baseball fan in 1968 and it broke my heart when theTigers eliminated the Sox from going to another World Series....I'm not sure but I think I swore at the radio alot in late summer 1968, I was just a kid, but I knew alot of the bad words.
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    Good stuff; whenn White Sox faded, they had been in 1st all yr; a great pennant race, that rivals the AL & NL races in '64.
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    Another anecdote; Growing up in Brooklyn NY,after '67 everybody on the street wanted the new Yaz Triple Crown Rawlings Glove; despite who he played for. Of course, in those days, the rivalry was, at best, a low simmer. Yaz was a national folk hero in those days. When he came up, people stopped what they were doing to watch (ala Mantle).
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from summerof67. Show summerof67's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    In Response to Re: nostalgia for '67:
    It was a gut wrenching weekend for us oldies. I was 17 at the time and man watched every game. Then had to wait and listen to the radio for the results in Detroit. If I remember correctly if Detroit won it was a one game playoff in Detroit.
    Posted by JimfromFlorida


    I remember that weekend.  Yaz hitting a single in that fifth inning to tie the score and Ken Hawk Harrelson hitting another single to send the Red Sox ahead.

    But - and I have alluded to this in several threads - the moment I remember is Jose Tartabull  - he of the rubber arm and no aim - throwing a strike to home plate during a game in Chicago to cut down the tying run  and cement a win. Without that play, anything could have happened - one playoff in Detroit with Lonborg unavailable - and who do you send to the mound to face Al Kaline, Norm Cash and Willie Horton?  Jose Santiago? Galen Cisco? 

    I shudder to think of it.

     


     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    That throw is now lore. How about this saying? Lonborg and Champagne.

    Those were the days.
     
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    Re: nostalgia for '67

    Summer: There's a great piece by Curly-haired boy in the Globe about that memorable Tartabull throw. Actually, it's about the passing of Dick Williams and how he impacted RedSox history.

    I found it of interest that Yaz, a recluse now, got back to him by phone immediately and Yaz's quotes of Williams are in the article. He felt William's success has his hard-driving style of the utility players. Long hours and hard work. When they were needed, they all cut it. First thing Dick W. did was strip Yaz of his captaincy. No more managers sucking up to Yaz.

    Carl was all for it.

    Terrific thread, DUSTCOVER.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from dustcover. Show dustcover's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    As a bit of a follow up, the final game of the 67 season, with Lonborg the winning pitcher has over the years received a great amount of attention.

    But lest we not forget, the Sox had to win the final two games against the Twins who going into the weekend were one full game ahead of the Sox and sat atop the American League standings in first place.

    In the first of the two-game series, manager Dick Williams slotted Jose Santiago, who had functioned as a middle relief pitcher for most of the season and had an 11-4 won/loss record, to face the Twins workhorse, Jim Katt, 16-12.

    The Twins broke the ice with a run in the top of the first, and Katt held the Sox scoreless through three innings. I’ve long since forgotten the reason, but Katt was replaced in the middle of the Sox at-bat in the third by Jim Perry.  Going into the bottom of the 5th, the score remained 1-0.


    But then Reggie Smith doubled, and Dalton Jones, pinch hitting, singles. Super sub all season, Jerry Adair, playing 3B that day, then singles followed by a Yaz single. Sox up 2-1.


    The Twins responded with a run in the top of the 6th, by way of a walk and two singles. But in the bottom of the 6th, the Boomer, George Scott, nullified the Twins run with a solo ‘tater’.

    After giving up a lead-off walk in the eighth, Williams lifted Santiago, who over 7 innings had given up only 2 runs, 7 hits and had 7 strikeouts. (Hello Tito!)  In came Gary Bell who retired the next 3 batters to end the 8th.


    But in the 9th, with two outs, Bell gives up a double to Tovar, followed by a Killebrew home run making it a 2-run game.

    At that moment half of New England took a deep breath causing a widespread unreported barometric anomaly.

    But Bell got Oliva to line out to 3rd for the third out and the win thus setting up the most famous final day game the Red Sox were ever going to play.

    Sox fans across New England breathed a collective sigh of relief, and most if not everyone reached for another drink. It’s hard to imagine anyone sleeping that night in anticipation of the following day’s game, I know I didn’t.

    And now forty-four years later, I’m at an age where I can barely remember what I had for breakfast yesterday, but I can clearly and quite vividly remember the oh so many wonderful details of that ‘impossible dream’ season.

    For some of you other old fogies, try sitting out in your back yard on a clear night with a star-filled sky and play the album from the Broadway musical Man of La Mancha with Richard Kiley. And I will guarantee that when he sings the Impossible Dream, you will have flashbacks and goose bumps galore.

    Thanks for allowing me to share this with you.

    GO SOX

     
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    Re: nostalgia for '67

    In Response to Re: nostalgia for '67:
    As a bit of a follow up, the final game of the 67 season, with Lonborg the winning pitcher has over the years received a great amount of attention. But lest we not forget, the Sox had to win the final two games against the Twins who going into the weekend were one full game ahead of the Sox and sat atop the American League standings in first place. In the first of the two-game series, manager Dick Williams slotted Jose Santiago, who had functioned as a middle relief pitcher for most of the season and had an 11-4 won/loss record, to face the Twins workhorse, Jim Katt, 16-12. The Twins broke the ice with a run in the top of the first, and Katt held the Sox scoreless through three innings. I’ve long since forgotten the reason, but Katt was replaced in the middle of the Sox at-bat in the third by Jim Perry.  Going into the bottom of the 5 th , the score remained 1-0. But then Reggie Smith doubled, and Dalton Jones, pinch hitting, singles. Super sub all season, Jerry Adair, playing 3B that day, then singles followed by a Yaz single. Sox up 2-1. The Twins responded with a run in the top of the 6 th , by way of a walk and two singles. But in the bottom of the 6 th , the Boomer, George Scott, nullified the Twins run with a solo ‘tater’. After giving up a lead-off walk in the eighth, Williams lifted Santiago, who over 7 innings had given up only 2 runs, 7 hits and had 7 strikeouts. (Hello Tito!)  In came Gary Bell who retired the next 3 batters to end the 8 th . But in the 9 th , with two outs, Bell gives up a double to Tovar, followed by a Killebrew home run making it a 2-run game. At that moment half of New England took a deep breath causing a widespread unreported barometric anomaly. But Bell got Oliva to line out to 3 rd for the third out and the win thus setting up the most famous final day game the Red Sox were ever going to play. Sox fans across New England breathed a collective sigh of relief, and most if not everyone reached for another drink. It’s hard to imagine anyone sleeping that night in anticipation of the following day’s game, I know I didn’t. And now forty-four years later, I’m at an age where I can barely remember what I had for breakfast yesterday,but I can clearly and quite vividly remember the oh so many wonderful details of that ‘impossible dream’ season. For some of you other old fogies, try sitting out in your back yard on a clear night with a star-filled sky and play the album from the Broadway musical Man of La Mancha with Richard Kiley. And I will guarantee that when he sings the Impossible Dream, you will have flashbacks and goose bumps galore. Thanks for allowing me to share this with you. GO SOX
    Posted by dustcover


    Hilarious. I look forward to the day I can forget certain posters here, but I'll never forget games 4 & 5 of the 2004 A.L. Finals against NY. Hell in a basket.
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    In Response to nostalgia for '67:
    For those who might not have been around in '67, this will give you an idea of just how 'tight' the pennant race was that year, and how truly remarkable was the outcome. As of the beginning of September — the last month of the season — the Angels had faded from a 5-team dogfight and the Red Sox sat atop of the American League, but were caught in a real battle with Chicago, Minnesota and Detroit. The four teams were separated by half a game and all jumped between first to fourth sporadically. The pennant race was coming down to the last weekend of the season. Unfortunately for the White Sox, a three-game sweep at the hands of the Washington Senators left Chicago three games out of first place and left the pennant scramble a three-team race. The Red Sox faced the Twins in a two game series at Fenway Park on that last weekend. The Twins were in first place and were ahead by one game over the Red Sox. The Red Sox had to sweep the Twins to have any opportunity to win the pennant. Another variable was that the Detroit Tigers would have to lose one more game. Ironically, the Tigers were playing the California Angels. In another twist, the Red Sox Carl Yastrzemski was trying to win the triple crown; he led the American League in batting average and RBI, and was tied for the home run lead with Harmon Killebrew of the Twins. Both players hit one home run in the series, so "Yaz" won the triple crown. In addition, in the two game series Yastrzemski went 7 for 8 with a home run and 6 RBI. In the last game of the season, 21 game winner Jim Lonborg got the start for the Red Sox vs. the Twins' 20 game winner Dean Chance . The Red Sox won the game 5-3 with a 5 run fifth inning, and Lonborg finished the season with 22 victories. In Detroit, the Tigers won the first game of a double header vs. the Angels, and needed to win the second game to tie the Red Sox for 1st place. But their bullpen failed, and the Angels' Rick Reichardt hit a home run in an 8-5 Angel win. The Red Sox had won their first American League pennant in 21 years.
    Posted by dustcover


    Dustcover,

    Nice job. 

    It was the first time I had experienced the Sox as winners.  It was absolutely amazing.  My best friend was a bit of a "realist" and so was sure the  outcome would fall for the Twins.

    Dean Chance...don't know why but you really stirred up something there.

    It was a great summer. 

    I remember the negative dudes even then ...  worst pennant record, Lonborg only won 22 games because the Sox scored a lot, blah blah ...


    BUT THEY DID AND THEY DID!!

    Again, nice trip down memory lane.

    I was 11.
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from dustcover. Show dustcover's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

     Dean Chance...don't know why but you really stirred up something there.

    It may be off the subject of the post, but you cannot mention Dean Chance without my thinking of Bo Belinsky, an earlier teammate of Chance's when they both played for the Angels.  The two of them were pals and their carousing in and around Hollywood would make Joe Namath look like a choir boy.
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from tomnev. Show tomnev's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    Nhsteven....I was 8 in 67 and also growing up in Brooklyn....had a dad and a older brother who were die hard yankee fans, but a best friend who was a distant relative of Yaz.....easy choice....that pennant race made me fall in love with the Sox...not easy in NY over the years...but so worth it in 04.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    In Response to Re: nostalgia for '67:
    Nhsteven....I was 8 in 67 and also growing up in Brooklyn....had a dad and a older brother who were die hard yankee fans, but a best friend who was a distant relative of Yaz.....easy choice....that pennant race made me fall in love with the Sox...not easy in NY over the years...but so worth it in 04.
    Posted by tomnev


    Tom,

       So, so true.  And it was and is a feeling the NYYs fans will never understand.  Entitlement losses its pleasure in numbers, I think.  That sweetness ... is beyond words.
     
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  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    In Response to Re: nostalgia for '67:
    I remember that glove, had all the numbers for Yaz, where your palm went.
    Posted by bobbysu


    Exactly, and is etched in my memory.
     
  19. This post has been removed.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    In Response to Re: nostalgia for '67:
    As a bit of a follow up, the final game of the 67 season, with Lonborg the winning pitcher has over the years received a great amount of attention. But lest we not forget, the Sox had to win the final two games against the Twins who going into the weekend were one full game ahead of the Sox and sat atop the American League standings in first place. In the first of the two-game series, manager Dick Williams slotted Jose Santiago, who had functioned as a middle relief pitcher for most of the season and had an 11-4 won/loss record, to face the Twins workhorse, Jim Katt, 16-12. The Twins broke the ice with a run in the top of the first, and Katt held the Sox scoreless through three innings. I’ve long since forgotten the reason, but Katt was replaced in the middle of the Sox at-bat in the third by Jim Perry.  Going into the bottom of the 5 th , the score remained 1-0. But then Reggie Smith doubled, and Dalton Jones, pinch hitting, singles. Super sub all season, Jerry Adair, playing 3B that day, then singles followed by a Yaz single. Sox up 2-1. The Twins responded with a run in the top of the 6 th , by way of a walk and two singles. But in the bottom of the 6 th , the Boomer, George Scott, nullified the Twins run with a solo ‘tater’. After giving up a lead-off walk in the eighth, Williams lifted Santiago, who over 7 innings had given up only 2 runs, 7 hits and had 7 strikeouts. (Hello Tito!)  In came Gary Bell who retired the next 3 batters to end the 8 th . But in the 9 th , with two outs, Bell gives up a double to Tovar, followed by a Killebrew home run making it a 2-run game. At that moment half of New England took a deep breath causing a widespread unreported barometric anomaly. But Bell got Oliva to line out to 3 rd for the third out and the win thus setting up the most famous final day game the Red Sox were ever going to play. Sox fans across New England breathed a collective sigh of relief, and most if not everyone reached for another drink. It’s hard to imagine anyone sleeping that night in anticipation of the following day’s game, I know I didn’t. And now forty-four years later, I’m at an age where I can barely remember what I had for breakfast yesterday, but I can clearly and quite vividly remember the oh so many wonderful details of that ‘impossible dream’ season. For some of you other old fogies, try sitting out in your back yard on a clear night with a star-filled sky and play the album from the Broadway musical Man of La Mancha with Richard Kiley. And I will guarantee that when he sings the Impossible Dream, you will have flashbacks and goose bumps galore. Thanks for allowing me to share this with you. GO SOX
    Posted by dustcover

    I've done that, LOL! The perfect piece to stare at the stars on a clear night.



     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    In Response to Re: nostalgia for '67:
    In Response to Re: nostalgia for '67 : Tom,    So, so true.  And it was and is a feeling the NYYs fans will never understand.  Entitlement losses its pleasure in numbers, I think.  That sweetness ... is beyond words.
    Posted by SinceYaz


    Although not a great moment for Yankee fans, I can understand that sentiment. When the '04 Series ended, Torre said he was glad for Wakefield; which blew him away; Torre was a class act, even in defeat.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    In Response to Re: nostalgia for '67:
     Dean Chance...don't know why but you really stirred up something there. It may be off the subject of the post, but you cannot mention Dean Chance without my thinking of Bo Belinsky, an earlier teammate of Chance's when they both played for the Angels.  The two of them were pals and their carousing in and around Hollywood would make Joe Namath look like a choir boy.
    Posted by dustcover


    Maybe that's why they both melted early. I remember an Allan Sherman song (the original Wierd Al, signature song "Hello Muddah Hello Faddah") that mentioned Bo.

    For a few yrs, Chance was as good as anybody (recall '64; CYA, 1.65 ERA); but a couple of things stand out; that yr, he had a 5 inning "Perfect Game". He was also a notoriously bad hitter, even for a P (Fans used to cheer when he fouled a ball off); and snapped an 0 for 77 'slump' from the beginning of the yr -- with a bunt single. Ahh, these useless factoids that pop up in your head when somebody else mentions something.
     
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    Re: nostalgia for '67

    Great thread, Dusty.  I was 6 at the time but one of my earliest memories was of the fans running onto the field at Fenway after the final game.  I have been a loyal Red Sox fan ever since. 
     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    Dusty ... this deserves more cover than given ... (pun intended)

    Those were golden days.  I remember the autumn in southern NH ... leaves in piles that we would rake up time and again ...

    Bob Gibson was angry and awesome. 

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    Re: nostalgia for '67

    In Response to Re: nostalgia for '67:
    In Response to Re: nostalgia for '67 : Although not a great moment for Yankee fans, I can understand that sentiment. When the '04 Series ended, Torre said he was glad for Wakefield; which blew him away; Torre was a class act, even in defeat.
    Posted by nhsteven



    Agreed, Steven, agreed.

    I liked him as a player.  His '71 Stra-o-matic card was outstanding.
     
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