Passing of Don Buddin

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from peanutandme. Show peanutandme's posts

    Passing of Don Buddin

    Just saw that Don Buddin died June 30th. Now many on this board will not recognize or remember Don Buddin,  but I  remenber the Sox signing and bringing Buddin to Boston.
    I was in my early teens and of course lived and died with the Sox as a teenager.
    When Buddin became the Sox regular [I believe it was in 1955], he was touted as the next great SS in the Ameican league. Well everyone  including[and the Sox espically] waited patiently for Buddin to become that player, and he never realized his potential, at least not in most people's minds. I remember listenting and lokking at the Box score's each day, waiting for Buddin to become this all-star SS. I remember becoming very frustated with him, and finally ths Sox realized he would not become all that  they had hoped for.
    Finally after about 5 years in Boston he was traded to [if memory serves me right] to Washington, and the Buddin era was mercifully over.
    But now with his passing it seems he  has become a better player than he was in Boston, and with each passing of player's from my youth, it seems just aittle of me die's also  I guess if you are still young, you won't realize how precious your younger day's are, and how nostaligic you become in later life.
    Rest in peace Don Buddin and forgive me for expecting you to be better that perfect.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from tbrod. Show tbrod's posts

    Re: Passing of Don Buddin

    I remember Don Buddin.
    He was the starting SS on the first Sox team in 1961, that I followed.
    He was much maligned and replaced by the more competent Eddie Bressoud.
    I think Buddin ended his career in Houston.
    RIP, for someone who had the curse of unrealized potential..
     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from dustcover. Show dustcover's posts

    Re: Passing of Don Buddin

    As I recall, in 1955 Don Buddin won the minor league MVP award playing for Louisville beating out fellow shortstop and minor leaguer Luis Aparicio who played for Memphis.  In light of which, the Red Sox organization and fan base had extraordinarily high hopes for this rookie.

    In 1956, Pinky Higgins, who had been installed as Red Sox manager, brought up minor leaguers, Frank Malzone and Don Buddin in hopes of making an immediate splash with the fans and the media.  Malzone had some early difficulties, as I recall, due to anxiety related to a health problem involving one of his kids.  He was sent back to the minors and thus the bulk of the pressure was on Buddin to deliver for Pinky Higgins.

    Initially, he did pretty well at the plate, but it became obvious that at shortstop he could go to his left and could go to his right, but had difficulty with balls hit straight at him. 

    As his woes in the field continued, his hitting began to suffer.  And the media and fans alike took umbrage because of the lofty expectations fueled by the exuberance Pinky Higgins had for his boy-wonder shortstop who he had previously managed in the minor leagues. 

    Higgins had pinned his hopes on Buddin to elevate the Sox into a contender.  So instead of benching Buddin and gradually easing him into the lineup, preferably on the road, Higgins continued to run him out there daily to the blistering and virulent verbal abuse of the Fenway faithful nurtured by the mean spiritedness of the Boston media at that time.  The media brought new meaning to the term 'whipping boy'.

    It got to be so bad, that on one occasion, Buddin stepped to the plate and while in the batter's box, wept. 

    Following one game, late in the 1959 season, I got to meet Don just outside the locker room; and I must say, he was one of the nicest guys you would ever hope to meet.  In spite of the abuse that he had endured from the fan-base, he treated me with respect, courtesy, and a genuine civility.  In that moment I gained an enormous amount of admiration for Don, not so much as a shortstop mind you, but as a fellow human being. 

    So Don, wherever you are, R.I.P. and know that you were and will always remain one of my all-time favorite Sox players.
     
     
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  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from Bill-806. Show Bill-806's posts

    Re: Passing of Don Buddin

        NOW BATTING & PLAYING SHORTSTOP, # 1 ,   DON BUDDIN !!!!
     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sheriff-Rojas. Show Sheriff-Rojas's posts

    Re: Passing of Don Buddin

    Buddin was before my time as a baseball fan, but all I had to do was mention his name to an elder Red Sox fan and it always triggered some response - sometimes pained and sometimes comic, and usually a bit of both. 

    Like the Pumpsie Greens and Dick Stuarts, Buddin is part of Red Sox lore and should be honored as such.  I hope he found more success and peace in his life than he did as a Red Sox shortstop. 

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from BOSOX1941. Show BOSOX1941's posts

    Re: Passing of Don Buddin

    IWasn't that the n Response to Re: Passing of Don Buddin:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Passing of Don Buddin :   May the baseball gods bless those who remember Don Buddin. For those too young to enjoy the past, and who choose to argue shallow, aggressive  beliefs (Smiley), those who choose to argue personal beliefs (Law), those who choose to not allow diversity on the board (Kim), those who inject humor into the posts (Zilla, Spaceman), those who taunt and do not defend their stances (Smiley/ Dig-it), please know that were there no Don Buddin, there would be no  Rick Burleson, or Chuck Schilling (that's right, Curt wasn't the first). He played with Frank Malzone (google him, Smiley), and Frank Sullivan, and Norm Zauchin and Sammy White (google more, Smiley, and probably Kim, too), because we old goats carry the torch that is major league baseball.
    Posted by prknsdnld[/QUOTE
     Gene Stephens, Billy Goodman, Ted Lepcio, Jimmy Piersoll, Jackie Jensen and the great Faye Thronberry. Curve ball artist Tom Brewer....
     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Passing of Don Buddin

    In Response to Re: Passing of Don Buddin:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Passing of Don Buddin :   May the baseball gods bless those who remember Don Buddin. For those too young to enjoy the past, and who choose to argue shallow, aggressive  beliefs (Smiley), those who choose to argue personal beliefs (Law), those who choose to not allow diversity on the board (Kim), those who inject humor into the posts (Zilla, Spaceman), those who taunt and do not defend their stances (Smiley/ Dig-it), please know that were there no Don Buddin, there would be no  Rick Burleson, or Chuck Schilling (that's right, Curt wasn't the first). He played with Frank Malzone (google him, Smiley), and Frank Sullivan, and Norm Zauchin and Sammy White (google more, Smiley, and probably Kim, too), because we old goats carry the torch that is major league baseball.
    Posted by prknsdnld[/QUOTE]

    Perfect.
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Passing of Don Buddin

    In Response to Re: Passing of Don Buddin:
    [QUOTE]I remember Don Buddin. He was the starting SS on the first Sox team in 1961, that I followed. He was much maligned and replaced by the more competent Eddie Bressoud. I think Buddin ended his career in Houston. RIP, for someone who had the curse of unrealized potential..
    Posted by tbrod[/QUOTE]

    When Buddin was mentioned by the OP, I immediately thought of his successor, ED Bressoud, who was barely adequate, and was even worse later on the Mets.
     
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  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Passing of Don Buddin

    In Response to Re: Passing of Don Buddin:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Passing of Don Buddin :  And, who played 52 games at SS for the '67 Cardinals. Wasn't life good then?
    Posted by prknsdnld[/QUOTE]

    The good ol' days
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from jidgef. Show jidgef's posts

    Re: Passing of Don Buddin

    I remember as kids whenever someone made an error we'd say he "buddined" it. Not the best way to be remembered I suppose, but he got to play in MLB while those of us who made fun of him could only dream about playing there. The fifties were hardly the glory days for Red Sox baseball. People growing up with this generation's Red Sox team, and still finding things to complain about, have no idea what it used to be like here as a Red Sox fan. 
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from ampoule. Show ampoule's posts

    Re: Passing of Don Buddin


    I remember Buddin.  And, I think, he was a pretty good Yankee killer...

    Norm Zauchin, Sammy White...great memories.  Did you fellas know that Zauchin worked in the off-season at a cement factory to get more muscular? 

    I'm wondering, without looking it up, if Jensen was in right and Piersall in center during this time.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Passing of Don Buddin

    In Response to Re: Passing of Don Buddin:
    [QUOTE]I remember as kids whenever someone made an error we'd say he "buddined" it. Not the best way to be remembered I suppose, but he got to play in MLB while those of us who made fun of him could only dream about playing there. The fifties were hardly the glory days for Red Sox baseball. People growing up with this generation's Red Sox team, and still finding things to complain about, have no idea what it used to be like here as a Red Sox fan. 
    Posted by jidgef[/QUOTE]

    He was NOT that bad of a SS; he was middle of the road.
     
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