R.I.P George "Boomer" Scott

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: R.I.P George

    Back in 1978 I was lucky to be at Fenway and see The Boomer hit one of his taters. He was a fun player to have on the Sox, a loveable guy. Sad to see him go.





    "Hold it fellows, that don't move me. Let's get real, real gone for a change."

    -Elvis Presley

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from dustcover. Show dustcover's posts

    Re: R.I.P George

    In response to Sheriff-Rojas's comment:

     

    In addition to hitting taters, he also said the ball looked like a grapefruit when he was seeing it well, and a black eyed pea when when he was not.  The Boomer had a thang for food references.  

    RIP boomer, the first Red Sox first baseman I remember watching.  

     




     

    You might also say 'He had a thang for food.' Period.  As to which Dick Williams would testify.Wink

    But most of all, I remember Boomer because he left 4 free tickets at the box office for me and three of my pals for the opening day game, 1967.  Considering the Sox in 1966 had finished 9th, 26 games out of 1st place, (Yankees finished 10th, 26.5 out of 1st) the attendance (8,324) at Fenway on opening day 1967 was sparse to say the least.  Tickets then, as compared to today, were very accessible and very inexpensive.  But, none the less, for four struggling college students, Boomer's gracious gift was immeasurable and forever endeared him in the hearts of the four of us.  And I might add, in spite of the frigid temperature that day, the loudest cheers came from four seats, ten rows deep along the 1st base line.

    For those nostalgia buffs, I refer you to:

    http://www.boston.com/sports/special/redsox/openingday/1967.html

     

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from TexasPat. Show TexasPat's posts

    Re: R.I.P George

    In response to CubanPete's comment:

    It was wrong for the Sox to trade him after the 1971 season, leaving the team without a legit 1B.

    It was wrong to reacquire him before the 1977 season, by giving up Cecil Cooper.

    Scott epitomized everything that was wrong with team management in the 1970s.

      

    ...the King of the Rumba Beat...



         Actually, the initial Scott trade wasn't all that bad, because it nearly led to them winning the AL East pennant in "72 (Sox fell one-half of a game short to the Detroit Tigers). The Sox had the right idea, in trading Scottie away to get some badly needed pitching. The October 10, 1971 trade consisted of the Sox sending Scottie, a worthless catcher named Don Pavletich, injury plagued pitcher Jim Lonborg, and prospects who had vastly disappointed, lefthanded pitcher Ken Brett, and supposedly power hitting OF, Joe Lahoud, for some guy named Pat Skrable, Tommy Harper, and starting pitchers Lew Krausse, and Marty Pattin.

         Harper had back to back great years with the Sox, in 1972 and 1973. Batting lead-off, he was the catalyst to their offense. Harper scored 92 runs in "72 and "73, stole 25 and 54 bases, respectively, hit for some power, and posted an OBP of .341 and .351 in those years. Krausse was worse than worthless, while Pattin pitched 253 innings, and won 17 games for the Sox in 1972. 

         In Scottie's five years in Milwaukee, he hit .263, 20 hrs, 88 rbi in "72, .306 24 hrs, 107 rbi in "73, .281, 17 hrs, 82 rbi in "74, .285 36 hrs., 109 rbi in "75, and .274 18 hrs., 77 rbi in "76.

         That said, the trade that brought Scottie back to Boston was far worse, as the Sox sent Cecil Cooper for Scottie and Bernie Carbo, in "77. Though Carbo had some big hits in Boston, Scottie was coming toward the end of the line, after initially hitting 33 homers for the Sox in "77. Cecil Cooper went onto an all-star career in Milwaukee.       

     

     

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from TexasPat. Show TexasPat's posts

    Re: R.I.P George

         The Passing of Scottie makes me feel old. I remember when he first came up with the Sox in 1966. He hit two titanic homeruns that year. In April of 1966, he hit a 505 foot bomb down the left field line in Yankee Stadium, off Whitey Ford. Later that year, he belted a 510 foot tater off former world series hero Larry Sherry, in Detroit:  http://georgeboomerscott.com/about-boomer/

         Ted Williams reportedly paid Scott the following compliment: I would pay to see him field his position. He was the greatest defensive first-baseman I ever saw. 

         Here's more on Scottie: http://sabr.org/bioproj/person/bc060d6c

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from royf19. Show royf19's posts

    Re: R.I.P George

    In response to TexasPat's comment:

    In response to CubanPete's comment:

     

    It was wrong for the Sox to trade him after the 1971 season, leaving the team without a legit 1B.

    It was wrong to reacquire him before the 1977 season, by giving up Cecil Cooper.

    Scott epitomized everything that was wrong with team management in the 1970s.

      

    ...the King of the Rumba Beat...

     



         Actually, the initial Scott trade wasn't all that bad, because it nearly led to them winning the AL East pennant in "72 (Sox fell one-half of a game short to the Detroit Tigers). The Sox had the right idea, in trading Scottie away to get some badly needed pitching. The October 10, 1971 trade consisted of the Sox sending Scottie, a worthless catcher named Don Pavletich, injury plagued pitcher Jim Lonborg, and prospects who had vastly disappointed, lefthanded pitcher Ken Brett, and supposedly power hitting OF, Joe Lahoud, for some guy named Pat Skrable, Tommy Harper, and starting pitchers Lew Krausse, and Marty Pattin.

     

         Harper had back to back great years with the Sox, in 1972 and 1973. Batting lead-off, he was the catalyst to their offense. Harper scored 92 runs in "72 and "73, stole 25 and 54 bases, respectively, hit for some power, and posted an OBP of .341 and .351 in those years. Krausse was worse than worthless, while Pattin pitched 253 innings, and won 17 games for the Sox in 1972. 

         In Scottie's five years in Milwaukee, he hit .263, 20 hrs, 88 rbi in "72, .306 24 hrs, 107 rbi in "73, .281, 17 hrs, 82 rbi in "74, .285 36 hrs., 109 rbi in "75, and .274 18 hrs., 77 rbi in "76.

         That said, the trade that brought Scottie back to Boston was far worse, as the Sox sent Cecil Cooper for Scottie and Bernie Carbo, in "77. Though Carbo had some big hits in Boston, Scottie was coming toward the end of the line, after initially hitting 33 homers for the Sox in "77. Cecil Cooper went onto an all-star career in Milwaukee.       

     

     

     



    You have a point about the first trade. I think in both cases, the Sox benefited short term but not long term.

    I like playing the what-if game.

    What if Scott and Longborg weren't traded. First, Lonborg was good in 1972 (3.23 ERA). In 1974 when the Sox collapsed in September, he had an excellent year in Philly (3.21 ERA, 17 wins). That was the year the Sox had picked up Rick Wise, who was hurt most of the year.

    And the Sox would have had Scott for those years, especially in 1975 when he had 36 home runs. Imagine having him at 1B, Yax in LF and Rice DH. Wondered what the W.S. would have been like.

     

     

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from JoeFoyFan. Show JoeFoyFan's posts

    Re: R.I.P George

    In response to Bill-806's comment:

    I loved watching the BOOMER @ 1st & Joe Foy @ 3rd !!!!     1967, It was only yesterday !!!




    ...and Yaz, Rico, Andrews, Reggie Smith, Tillman, Tony C., Gentleman Jim, and...

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from 67redsox. Show 67redsox's posts

    Re: R.I.P George

    In response to JoeFoyFan's comment:

    In response to Bill-806's comment:

     

    I loved watching the BOOMER @ 1st & Joe Foy @ 3rd !!!!     1967, It was only yesterday !!!

    Yup, it sure was!




    ...and Yaz, Rico, Andrews, Reggie Smith, Tillman, Tony C., Gentleman Jim, and...

     




     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sheriff-Rojas. Show Sheriff-Rojas's posts

    Re: R.I.P George

    In response to dustcover's comment:

    In response to Sheriff-Rojas's comment:

     

    In addition to hitting taters, he also said the ball looked like a grapefruit when he was seeing it well, and a black eyed pea when when he was not.  The Boomer had a thang for food references.  

    RIP boomer, the first Red Sox first baseman I remember watching.  

     




     

    You might also say 'He had a thang for food.' Period.  As to which Dick Williams would testify.Wink

    But most of all, I remember Boomer because he left 4 free tickets at the box office for me and three of my pals for the opening day game, 1967.  Considering the Sox in 1966 had finished 9th, 26 games out of 1st place, (Yankees finished 10th, 26.5 out of 1st) the attendance (8,324) at Fenway on opening day 1967 was sparse to say the least.  Tickets then, as compared to today, were very accessible and very inexpensive.  But, none the less, for four struggling college students, Boomer's gracious gift was immeasurable and forever endeared him in the hearts of the four of us.  And I might add, in spite of the frigid temperature that day, the loudest cheers came from four seats, ten rows deep along the 1st base line.

    For those nostalgia buffs, I refer you to:

    http://www.boston.com/sports/special/redsox/openingday/1967.html

     



    Great story, Dusty.  I offer condolences because I can clearly see how extra special the Boomer was to you.  

    Getting back to the food thang.  Cause of death hasn't been disclosed yet, but I read that he weighed over 400 pounds and was diabetic.  The food references may have been indicative of a food obsession.  Maybe too many taters, probably of the fried variety.  He should have stuck with the grapefruits and black eyed peas. 

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from 56redsox. Show 56redsox's posts

    Re: R.I.P George


    Oh Chit, Been Away..Loved You At 1B Back In The Day, RIP BIG GEORGE Scott.......Cry.....

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from LeftyGrove. Show LeftyGrove's posts

    Re: R.I.P George

    In response to Sheriff-Rojas' comment:

    In response to dustcover's comment:


    BOOMER was a magician, artist with the glove around first base. He played some third as well. As a kid watching the Sox from 66 forward, and being a first baseman in little league, of course my defensive role model was George Scott.

    Eight gold gloves, you gotta be real special to pull down that many with competition every year.

    RIP, BOOMER, you gave us many fond memories, reasons to cheer and a style to replicate on the diamond.

     

    In response to Sheriff-Rojas's comment:

     

    In addition to hitting taters, he also said the ball looked like a grapefruit when he was seeing it well, and a black eyed pea when when he was not.  The Boomer had a thang for food references.  

    RIP boomer, the first Red Sox first baseman I remember watching.  

     




     

    You might also say 'He had a thang for food.' Period.  As to which Dick Williams would testify.Wink

    But most of all, I remember Boomer because he left 4 free tickets at the box office for me and three of my pals for the opening day game, 1967.  Considering the Sox in 1966 had finished 9th, 26 games out of 1st place, (Yankees finished 10th, 26.5 out of 1st) the attendance (8,324) at Fenway on opening day 1967 was sparse to say the least.  Tickets then, as compared to today, were very accessible and very inexpensive.  But, none the less, for four struggling college students, Boomer's gracious gift was immeasurable and forever endeared him in the hearts of the four of us.  And I might add, in spite of the frigid temperature that day, the loudest cheers came from four seats, ten rows deep along the 1st base line.

    For those nostalgia buffs, I refer you to:

    http://www.boston.com/sports/special/redsox/openingday/1967.html

     

     



    Great story, Dusty.  I offer condolences because I can clearly see how extra special the Boomer was to you.  

     

    Getting back to the food thang.  Cause of death hasn't been disclosed yet, but I read that he weighed over 400 pounds and was diabetic.  The food references may have been indicative of a food obsession.  Maybe too many taters, probably of the fried variety.  He should have stuck with the grapefruits and black eyed peas. 




     
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