Runnin' Wild

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: Runnin' Wild

    By mixing it up, the opponents will play "honest" instead of cheating on their positioning knowing we never bunt or hit and run. 

    I think Tito was too predictable. My hope is Bobby V will not be.
     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Boomerangsdotcom. Show Boomerangsdotcom's posts

    Re: Runnin' Wild

    I wonder how many of Pedroia's instances of running into outs were due to poor implementation of hit and run calls and such. I see that changing this year as Bobby V has been calling them all over the place. 

    Let's be honest, Tito stunk at coaching fundamentals and setting the bar in that department. I love the guy and consider him a great coach but this was a huge weakness for him. We couldn't bunt or hit and run well at all, or at least that's my impression from watching the games and not looking up the data.
     
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  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from expitch. Show expitch's posts

    Re: Runnin' Wild

    In Response to Re: Runnin' Wild:
    [QUOTE]I wonder how many of Pedroia's instances of running into outs were due to poor implementation of hit and run calls and such. I see that changing this year as Bobby V has been calling them all over the place.  Let's be honest, Tito stunk at coaching fundamentals and setting the bar in that department. I love the guy and consider him a great coach but this was a huge weakness for him. We couldn't bunt or hit and run well at all, or at least that's my impression from watching the games and not looking up the data.
    Posted by Boomerangsdotcom[/QUOTE]
    Mine too. In addition, in general, the Sox were what might be called mentally sluggish on the bases, the reverse of opportunistic, and content to let the big guys plod. I don't mean steal but look for chances to take the extra base or be put in motion. Business can be done on the bases even without burners there.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    Re: Runnin' Wild

    There we go!

       I agree, Moon and Pitch ...and others who have been sharing situational use of speed,  I'm speaking of a mind set that is alert and uses our talents on the base paths.

      I know that what I meant  was assuming that change in mind set ... but with Bobby that seems to be happening.

      I can't remember now many passed balls we've had where it appeared no one was ready to take the next base ... (just one case)  Alert and ready, who knows how a free base could help.  Certainly easier to score from the next base than the one presently on.... 
     
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    Re: Runnin' Wild

    In Response to Re: Runnin' Wild:
    [QUOTE]There we go!    I agree, Moon and Pitch ...and others who have been sharing situational use of speed,   I'm speaking of a mind set that is alert and uses our talents on the base paths.   I know that what I meant  was assuming that change in mind set ... but with Bobby that seems to be happening.   I can't remember now many passed balls we've had where it appeared no one was ready to take the next base ... (just one case)  Alert and ready, who knows how a free base could help.  Certainly easier to score from the next base than the one presently on.... 
    Posted by SinceYaz[/QUOTE]

    That's partly the responisibility of the base coaches too. Overall I agree with your observation. The Sox under Francona weren't the most aggressive team on the base paths. From early on in a ballplayers career you're taught that if I (the coach) have to tell you to go, it's too late. If the players are getting good secondary leads, and anticipating the ball in the dirt and are allowed to be aggressive. They're more likely to take the chance. However if the coaching staff doesn't make it a priority. Then most are comfortable just staying put...
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from expitch. Show expitch's posts

    Re: Runnin' Wild

    In Response to Re: Runnin' Wild:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Runnin' Wild : That's partly the responisibility of the base coaches too. Overall I agree with your observation. The Sox under Francona weren't the most aggressive team on the base paths. From early on in a ballplayers career you're taught that if I (the coach) have to tell you to go, it's too late. If the players are getting good secondary leads, and anticipating the ball in the dirt and are allowed to be aggressive. They're more likely to take the chance. However if the coaching staff doesn't make it a priority. Then most are comfortable just staying put...
    Posted by Beantowne[/QUOTE]
    Right to the point, especially the part about the secondary lead. A runner should anticipate a ball in the dirt on every pitch -- after he makes sure he isn't picked off. 
    With a RHed power hitter at the plate and one out, a runner on second who has a good secondary lead should be thinking about swiping third. The third baseman will be playing deep ( implants are expensive ), and the batter is briefly in the catcher's way. If the shortstop and second baseman are more concerned about a run-scoring hit going through the infield than in bothering the runner on second, as they should be, the runner can get that good secondary lead. Pitchers are typically less vigilant about a runner on second than about one on first. Their interest can be sized up on the first pitch. 
    There are baseball people who think that stealing third is easier than stealing second -- if runners know what they are doing and pick the right situation, like the one above. My college baseball coach was one of those people. His teams were known for swiping third.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: Runnin' Wild

    I can't remember now many passed balls we've had where it appeared no one was ready to take the next base ... (just one case)  Alert and ready, who knows how a free base could help.  Certainly easier to score from the next base than the one presently on.... 

    I also remember the countless times a runner gets to a base with his head down, and enver noticed a bobbled ball, a throw to the wrong base or some other mistake that may have allowed them to take the extra base. 99% of the time there's no extra base to be taken, but runners should round the base and keep their eyes open. I'm hoping that happenes more this year. 

    It's something that has always bugged me about the Sox of old. 
     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: Runnin' Wild

    In Response to Re: Runnin' Wild:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Runnin' Wild : That's partly the responisibility of the base coaches too. Overall I agree with your observation. The Sox under Francona weren't the most aggressive team on the base paths. From early on in a ballplayers career you're taught that if I (the coach) have to tell you to go, it's too late. If the players are getting good secondary leads, and anticipating the ball in the dirt and are allowed to be aggressive. They're more likely to take the chance. However if the coaching staff doesn't make it a priority. Then most are comfortable just staying put...
    Posted by Beantowne[/QUOTE]

    Well, with our 3B coaches recently, can we blame them?

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    Re: Runnin' Wild

    In Response to Re: Runnin' Wild:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Runnin' Wild : Well, with our 3B coaches recently, can we blame them?
    Posted by moonslav59[/QUOTE]

    Agree with your previous post here, too, Moon.   Heads UP!!!   :o)

    I don't know if Bogar has improved, but I have a distinctly bad taste in my mouth from some time back when he seemed almost totally inept at third.   (And you know how hard it is for me to say that kiind of stuff....)  And now he's touted as hot managerial material???  

    I just hope he's improved.
     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Runnin' Wild

    3B coaches, for the most part, are not involved with SBs, which is where most of the aggressive running occurs; waving guys home is pretty much a standard approach with little discrepancy for all teams, and yes, the 3B coach is a factor here with respect to deviations from that standard. The point is, the Running Wild mode is not, IMO, going to make Bogar even a greater risk as a result. And regardless, with that lineup, you really don't want to play fast and loose with baserunners rounding 3rd like a revolving door. Stealing is different due to Ells & CC.
     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

    Re: Runnin' Wild

    In Response to Re: Runnin' Wild:
    [QUOTE]3B coaches, for the most part, are not involved with SBs, which is where most of the aggressive running occurs; waving guys home is pretty much a standard approach with little discrepancy for all teams, and yes, the 3B coach is a factor here with respect to deviations from that standard. The point is, the Running Wild mode is not, IMO, going to make Bogar even a greater risk as a result. And regardless, with that lineup, you really don't want to play fast and loose with baserunners rounding 3rd like a revolving door. Stealing is different due to Ells & CC.
    Posted by nhsteven[/QUOTE]

    Steve,

       Exactly the point with Ells and CC ...  and Pedey is adept as well.  I wouldn't expect Papi or Salty to be stealing .. but heads up and aware ...  that we could ask.

      And 3B coach....my point with Bogar is he DID miss several calls about going home. Some rather important ones. I don't see that many games, so it is very likely those "opps"es stick out unfairly...

      Back to fritters
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Runnin' Wild

    In Response to Re: Runnin' Wild:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Runnin' Wild : Steve,    Exactly the point with Ells and CC ...  and Pedey is adept as well.  I wouldn't expect Papi or Salty to be stealing .. but heads up and aware ...  that we could ask.   And 3B coach....my point with Bogar is he DID miss several calls about going home. Some rather important ones. I don't see that many games, so it is very likely those "opps"es stick out unfairly...   Back to fritters
    Posted by SinceYaz[/QUOTE]

    Forgot about him, SY
     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from SinceYaz. Show SinceYaz's posts

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    In Response to Re: Runnin' Wild:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Runnin' Wild : Forgot about him, SY
    Posted by nhsteven[/QUOTE]

    If you give up on Robbie ...   :oD
     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from Beantowne. Show Beantowne's posts

    Re: Runnin' Wild

    In Response to Re: Runnin' Wild:
    [QUOTE]3B coaches, for the most part, are not involved with SBs, which is where most of the aggressive running occurs; waving guys home is pretty much a standard approach with little discrepancy for all teams, and yes, the 3B coach is a factor here with respect to deviations from that standard. The point is, the Running Wild mode is not, IMO, going to make Bogar even a greater risk as a result. And regardless, with that lineup, you really don't want to play fast and loose with baserunners rounding 3rd like a revolving door. Stealing is different due to Ells & CC.
    Posted by nhsteven[/QUOTE]

    NH,

    Not sure I agree, the 3B coach is the one that gives the signs to the hitter/base runner sent to him by the manager and/or in many cases the 3B coach is given the lattitude to "run the offense". The 3B coach is also responsible for picking up the runner as he approaches 2B and once there (along with the runner on 3rd). Which is why many 3B coaches next step in the ladder of success is a mangers job. 1B coaches tend to be guys that are adept at reading a pitchers move to first and after the runner vacates the base and reaches 2nd. The 1b coaches job is done. Coaching 3rd with runners on base is akin to being a air traffic controller. The better ones are those that can read the ball off the bat, have a good knowledge of the Ofer's range and arm and an intuitive knowledge of his own players ability to get good jumps.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: Runnin' Wild

     The better ones are those that can read the ball off the bat, have a good knowledge of the Ofer's range and arm and an intuitive knowledge of his own players ability to get good jumps.

    From kim to bogar, we have had some of the worst "controllers" in MLB.
     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Runnin' Wild

    In Response to Re: Runnin' Wild:
    [QUOTE]In Response to Re: Runnin' Wild : NH, Not sure I agree, the 3B coach is the one that gives the signs to the hitter/base runner sent to him by the manager and/or in many cases the 3B coach is given the lattitude to "run the offense". The 3B coach is also responsible for picking up the runner as he approaches 2B and once there (along with the runner on 3rd). Which is why many 3B coaches next step in the ladder of success is a mangers job. 1B coaches tend to be guys that are adept at reading a pitchers move to first and after the runner vacates the base and reaches 2nd. The 1b coaches job is done. Coaching 3rd with runners on base is akin to being a air traffic controller. The better ones are those that can read the ball off the bat, have a good knowledge of the Ofer's range and arm and an intuitive knowledge of his own players ability to get good jumps.
    Posted by Beantowne[/QUOTE]

    The signs the 3b coach give to the batter are usually relays from the dugout. As far as the skills of 3b coaches, IMO there's little discrepancy among them, not that mistakes can't be made. Team philosophy is a bigger factor.
     

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