Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from maxbialystock. Show maxbialystock's posts

    Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    Named Herrera.  Everyone else among the 12 position players is expected to hit.  Even Ross and Pierzynski are expected to hit within the parameters of decent hitting catchers.  But neither is expected to be an ace defensively or, god forbid, throw out baserunners going to second. 

    I completely agree with starting Sizemore in CF because he is good field as well as good hit, but we also have to recognize he is likely to have durability issues.  Bradley on the other hand is an ace fielder in CF, a position that cries out for a great fielder, and he is as far as we know very durable.  But he is going to play for Pawtucket, not Boston, because his hitting is suspect.  Simple as that.  As good as Victorino is playing RF--maybe one of the two or three best the Sox have had out there--the Sox signed him with expectations he would hit, and he has.  Nava, Gomes, and Carp are the other three outfielders--the Sox are carrying five outfielders because two, Carp and Nava, can also play 1B--and none is a good fielder.  Heck, none is a good baserunner.  Was it last year when Nava was on 2B and failed to advance to 3B on a ball hit all the way to the wall in deep right field, a sure double and possible triple?  But that's OK because job one for Nava, which he does well, is to get on base, period.   

    Infield, same deal.  Napoli, Pedroia, Bogaerts, and Middlebrooks are all expected to hit first, field second even though none is a lousy fielder (I'm giving MBR the benefit of the doubt here). 

    And it's not just this year.  The Sox have always favored good hitters over good fielders, largely because they play at Fenway and know they must score to win.  The 2004 WS champs had I think a guy named Mueller who was hitting .287 and batted 8th.  That, sports fans, is a lineup. 

    Last year the Sox had a brilliant SS, Iglesias, and let him go to Detroit--who were thrilled to get him--to get a so-so starter, Peavy.  Fortunately, by then Drew was a very solid defensive SS--not brilliant, but very dependable--and a better  hitter.  But Iglesias was the SS of the future, assuming he could hit.  The problem was the Sox didn't think he would hit (and maybe they were nervous about the pains in his legs).  This year the Sox did not bring back that very reliable fielding SS Drew because they had/have a better hitting and younger model named Bogaerts. 

    We all know that Pedroia is one ferociously good fielder at 2B and has one more than one gold glove.  But forget that long-term contract if he weren't also a terrific hitter, good enough one year to win the AL MVP. 

    The single greatest player in Sox history was the embodiment of great hit, so-so field (by his own admission), Mr. Ted Williams, the splendid splinter (occasionally spitter). 

    So when Mr. Herrera meets new people and they ask him what he does for a living, he can brag he is the rarest of rarities, a Boston Red Sox designated non-hitter.  He made the squad because of his glove--to which a knowledgeable fan should say, "Wow.  I didn't think that was possible." 

     

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    And it's not just this year.  The Sox have always favored good hitters over good fielders, largely because they play at Fenway and know they must score to win.  The 2004 WS champs had I think a guy named Mueller who was hitting .287 and batted 8th.  That, sports fans, is a lineup. 

    [/QUOTE]

    There's a lot of truth in this but I think you're generalizing a bit too much.

    2004 was also the year of the Nomar trade, the great benefit of which was the improvement in the team's defence.

    Last year a big reason Victorino was acquired, IMO, was his defence.

    A big reason they decided to fork out to re-sign Napoli, IMO, was his (surprisingly good) defence.

    In the playoffs last year they kept Drew in the lineup for his defence although he was floundering at the plate.

    This team does value defence a lot.  But I agree that the scale does tip more toward offence because of Fenway.  

     

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    And it's not just this year.  The Sox have always favored good hitters over good fielders, largely because they play at Fenway and know they must score to win.  The 2004 WS champs had I think a guy named Mueller who was hitting .287 and batted 8th.  That, sports fans, is a lineup. 

    [/QUOTE]

    There's a lot of truth in this but I think you're generalizing a bit too much.

    2004 was also the year of the Nomar trade, the great benefit of which was the improvement in the team's defence.

    Last year a big reason Victorino was acquired, IMO, was his defence.

    A big reason they decided to fork out to re-sign Napoli, IMO, was his (surprisingly good) defence.

    In the playoffs last year they kept Drew in the lineup for his defence although he was floundering at the plate.

    This team does value defence a lot.  But I agree that the scale does tip more toward offence because of Fenway.  

     

    [/QUOTE]

    I'm a defense-first type, but I think they are pretty balanced.  Vic and Pedey are GG-level, and Drew, Ells, and Naps are one level below GG.  And Fenway plays a little different because of park factors.  You need virtually no range in LF, and the lack of foul territory lessens the range required of a 1B and 3B.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from moonslav59. Show moonslav59's posts

    Re: Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    2013: the Sox placed 11th in team UZR/150 at +2.6.

    We should see a gain at catcher, a loss at SS and maybe 3B, and close to a push in CF.

     
  5. This post has been removed.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Beantowne. Show Beantowne's posts

    Re: Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Named Herrera.  Everyone else among the 12 position players is expected to hit.  Even Ross and Pierzynski are expected to hit within the parameters of decent hitting catchers.  But neither is expected to be an ace defensively or, god forbid, throw out baserunners going to second. 

    I completely agree with starting Sizemore in CF because he is good field as well as good hit, but we also have to recognize he is likely to have durability issues.  Bradley on the other hand is an ace fielder in CF, a position that cries out for a great fielder, and he is as far as we know very durable.  But he is going to play for Pawtucket, not Boston, because his hitting is suspect.  Simple as that.  As good as Victorino is playing RF--maybe one of the two or three best the Sox have had out there--the Sox signed him with expectations he would hit, and he has.  Nava, Gomes, and Carp are the other three outfielders--the Sox are carrying five outfielders because two, Carp and Nava, can also play 1B--and none is a good fielder.  Heck, none is a good baserunner.  Was it last year when Nava was on 2B and failed to advance to 3B on a ball hit all the way to the wall in deep right field, a sure double and possible triple?  But that's OK because job one for Nava, which he does well, is to get on base, period.   

    Infield, same deal.  Napoli, Pedroia, Bogaerts, and Middlebrooks are all expected to hit first, field second even though none is a lousy fielder (I'm giving MBR the benefit of the doubt here). 

    And it's not just this year.  The Sox have always favored good hitters over good fielders, largely because they play at Fenway and know they must score to win.  The 2004 WS champs had I think a guy named Mueller who was hitting .287 and batted 8th.  That, sports fans, is a lineup. 

    Last year the Sox had a brilliant SS, Iglesias, and let him go to Detroit--who were thrilled to get him--to get a so-so starter, Peavy.  Fortunately, by then Drew was a very solid defensive SS--not brilliant, but very dependable--and a better  hitter.  But Iglesias was the SS of the future, assuming he could hit.  The problem was the Sox didn't think he would hit (and maybe they were nervous about the pains in his legs).  This year the Sox did not bring back that very reliable fielding SS Drew because they had/have a better hitting and younger model named Bogaerts. 

    We all know that Pedroia is one ferociously good fielder at 2B and has one more than one gold glove.  But forget that long-term contract if he weren't also a terrific hitter, good enough one year to win the AL MVP. 

    The single greatest player in Sox history was the embodiment of great hit, so-so field (by his own admission), Mr. Ted Williams, the splendid splinter (occasionally spitter). 

    So when Mr. Herrera meets new people and they ask him what he does for a living, he can brag he is the rarest of rarities, a Boston Red Sox designated non-hitter.  He made the squad because of his glove--to which a knowledgeable fan should say, "Wow.  I didn't think that was possible." 

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Max,

    In the end it's the sum of the parts that ultimately tip he scale for all position players. I think you're under estimating the value the Red Sox place on defense. All teams will start the better hitter at any position, as long as they can field the position and make the routine play, look routine. A players abilty to field his position is secondary to thier ability to hit at or above the league average for their respective positions. 

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from jidgef. Show jidgef's posts

    Re: Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    Max you might also be selling Herrera a bit short. While he will never be considered an offense-frist kind of player, from what I have seen this spring he has delivered some very tough at-bats. He will not be an automatic out as lots of utility infielders are; he can run a bit and I believe that people in Boston are going to be very happy with this aquisition.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    In response to jidgef's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Max you might also be selling Herrera a bit short. While he will never be considered an offense-frist kind of player, from what I have seen this spring he has delivered some very tough at-bats. He will not be an automatic out as lots of utility infielders are; he can run a bit and I believe that people in Boston are going to be very happy with this aquisition.

    [/QUOTE]

    Yeah, I don't think he's a donut.  His career road OPS is .645, and he modestly better against righties than lefties.  The league-wide average SS only had a .682.  He seems like a reasonable alternative.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from steven11. Show steven11's posts

    Re: Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Named Herrera.  Everyone else among the 12 position players is expected to hit.  Even Ross and Pierzynski are expected to hit within the parameters of decent hitting catchers.  But neither is expected to be an ace defensively or, god forbid, throw out baserunners going to second. 

    I completely agree with starting Sizemore in CF because he is good field as well as good hit, but we also have to recognize he is likely to have durability issues.  Bradley on the other hand is an ace fielder in CF, a position that cries out for a great fielder, and he is as far as we know very durable.  But he is going to play for Pawtucket, not Boston, because his hitting is suspect.  Simple as that.  As good as Victorino is playing RF--maybe one of the two or three best the Sox have had out there--the Sox signed him with expectations he would hit, and he has.  Nava, Gomes, and Carp are the other three outfielders--the Sox are carrying five outfielders because two, Carp and Nava, can also play 1B--and none is a good fielder.  Heck, none is a good baserunner.  Was it last year when Nava was on 2B and failed to advance to 3B on a ball hit all the way to the wall in deep right field, a sure double and possible triple?  But that's OK because job one for Nava, which he does well, is to get on base, period.   

    Infield, same deal.  Napoli, Pedroia, Bogaerts, and Middlebrooks are all expected to hit first, field second even though none is a lousy fielder (I'm giving MBR the benefit of the doubt here). 

    And it's not just this year.  The Sox have always favored good hitters over good fielders, largely because they play at Fenway and know they must score to win.  The 2004 WS champs had I think a guy named Mueller who was hitting .287 and batted 8th.  That, sports fans, is a lineup. 

    Last year the Sox had a brilliant SS, Iglesias, and let him go to Detroit--who were thrilled to get him--to get a so-so starter, Peavy.  Fortunately, by then Drew was a very solid defensive SS--not brilliant, but very dependable--and a better  hitter.  But Iglesias was the SS of the future, assuming he could hit.  The problem was the Sox didn't think he would hit (and maybe they were nervous about the pains in his legs).  This year the Sox did not bring back that very reliable fielding SS Drew because they had/have a better hitting and younger model named Bogaerts. 

    We all know that Pedroia is one ferociously good fielder at 2B and has one more than one gold glove.  But forget that long-term contract if he weren't also a terrific hitter, good enough one year to win the AL MVP. 

    The single greatest player in Sox history was the embodiment of great hit, so-so field (by his own admission), Mr. Ted Williams, the splendid splinter (occasionally spitter). 

    So when Mr. Herrera meets new people and they ask him what he does for a living, he can brag he is the rarest of rarities, a Boston Red Sox designated non-hitter.  He made the squad because of his glove--to which a knowledgeable fan should say, "Wow.  I didn't think that was possible." 

     

     

    [/QUOTE]


    nice post, well written.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from maxbialystock. Show maxbialystock's posts

    Re: Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    And it's not just this year.  The Sox have always favored good hitters over good fielders, largely because they play at Fenway and know they must score to win.  The 2004 WS champs had I think a guy named Mueller who was hitting .287 and batted 8th.  That, sports fans, is a lineup. 

    [/QUOTE]

    There's a lot of truth in this but I think you're generalizing a bit too much.

    2004 was also the year of the Nomar trade, the great benefit of which was the improvement in the team's defence.

    Last year a big reason Victorino was acquired, IMO, was his defence.

    A big reason they decided to fork out to re-sign Napoli, IMO, was his (surprisingly good) defence.

    In the playoffs last year they kept Drew in the lineup for his defence although he was floundering at the plate.

    This team does value defence a lot.  But I agree that the scale does tip more toward offence because of Fenway.  

     

    [/QUOTE]

    nomar left because he insisted on it.  they loved his bat.  

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from maxbialystock. Show maxbialystock's posts

    Re: Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to jidgef's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Max you might also be selling Herrera a bit short. While he will never be considered an offense-frist kind of player, from what I have seen this spring he has delivered some very tough at-bats. He will not be an automatic out as lots of utility infielders are; he can run a bit and I believe that people in Boston are going to be very happy with this aquisition.

    [/QUOTE]

    Yeah, I don't think he's a donut.  His career road OPS is .645, and he modestly better against righties than lefties.  The league-wide average SS only had a .682.  He seems like a reasonable alternative.

    [/QUOTE]

    Come on guys.  The regular SS is hoped to be an all star level hitter.  

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from maxbialystock. Show maxbialystock's posts

    Re: Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    In response to Beantowne's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Named Herrera.  Everyone else among the 12 position players is expected to hit.  Even Ross and Pierzynski are expected to hit within the parameters of decent hitting catchers.  But neither is expected to be an ace defensively or, god forbid, throw out baserunners going to second. 

    I completely agree with starting Sizemore in CF because he is good field as well as good hit, but we also have to recognize he is likely to have durability issues.  Bradley on the other hand is an ace fielder in CF, a position that cries out for a great fielder, and he is as far as we know very durable.  But he is going to play for Pawtucket, not Boston, because his hitting is suspect.  Simple as that.  As good as Victorino is playing RF--maybe one of the two or three best the Sox have had out there--the Sox signed him with expectations he would hit, and he has.  Nava, Gomes, and Carp are the other three outfielders--the Sox are carrying five outfielders because two, Carp and Nava, can also play 1B--and none is a good fielder.  Heck, none is a good baserunner.  Was it last year when Nava was on 2B and failed to advance to 3B on a ball hit all the way to the wall in deep right field, a sure double and possible triple?  But that's OK because job one for Nava, which he does well, is to get on base, period.   

    Infield, same deal.  Napoli, Pedroia, Bogaerts, and Middlebrooks are all expected to hit first, field second even though none is a lousy fielder (I'm giving MBR the benefit of the doubt here). 

    And it's not just this year.  The Sox have always favored good hitters over good fielders, largely because they play at Fenway and know they must score to win.  The 2004 WS champs had I think a guy named Mueller who was hitting .287 and batted 8th.  That, sports fans, is a lineup. 

    Last year the Sox had a brilliant SS, Iglesias, and let him go to Detroit--who were thrilled to get him--to get a so-so starter, Peavy.  Fortunately, by then Drew was a very solid defensive SS--not brilliant, but very dependable--and a better  hitter.  But Iglesias was the SS of the future, assuming he could hit.  The problem was the Sox didn't think he would hit (and maybe they were nervous about the pains in his legs).  This year the Sox did not bring back that very reliable fielding SS Drew because they had/have a better hitting and younger model named Bogaerts. 

    We all know that Pedroia is one ferociously good fielder at 2B and has one more than one gold glove.  But forget that long-term contract if he weren't also a terrific hitter, good enough one year to win the AL MVP. 

    The single greatest player in Sox history was the embodiment of great hit, so-so field (by his own admission), Mr. Ted Williams, the splendid splinter (occasionally spitter). 

    So when Mr. Herrera meets new people and they ask him what he does for a living, he can brag he is the rarest of rarities, a Boston Red Sox designated non-hitter.  He made the squad because of his glove--to which a knowledgeable fan should say, "Wow.  I didn't think that was possible." 

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Max,

    In the end it's the sum of the parts that ultimately tip he scale for all position players. I think you're under estimating the value the Red Sox place on defense. All teams will start the better hitter at any position, as long as they can field the position and make the routine play, look routine. A players abilty to field his position is secondary to thier ability to hit at or above the league average for their respective positions. 

    [/QUOTE]

    Ever heard of Iglesias?  Tigers were ecstatic to get him--young with a great glove.  Sox dumped him to get Peavy.  Tigers were/are prepared to start iglesias at SS for a decade.  

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Ever heard of Iglesias?  Tigers were ecstatic to get him--young with a great glove.  Sox dumped him to get Peavy.  Tigers were/are prepared to start iglesias at SS for a decade.  

    [/QUOTE]

    You're seriously overplaying your hand.  The Tigers had an emergency because of Peralta's suspension.  It was hardly their plan at the start of 2013 to trade for Iglesias and have him be their shortstop for a decade.

     

     

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to jidgef's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Max you might also be selling Herrera a bit short. While he will never be considered an offense-frist kind of player, from what I have seen this spring he has delivered some very tough at-bats. He will not be an automatic out as lots of utility infielders are; he can run a bit and I believe that people in Boston are going to be very happy with this aquisition.

    [/QUOTE]

    Yeah, I don't think he's a donut.  His career road OPS is .645, and he modestly better against righties than lefties.  The league-wide average SS only had a .682.  He seems like a reasonable alternative.

    [/QUOTE]

    Come on guys.  The regular SS is hoped to be an all star level hitter.  

    [/QUOTE]

    Why would that be? SS is a tough defensive position.

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Beantowne's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Named Herrera.  Everyone else among the 12 position players is expected to hit.  Even Ross and Pierzynski are expected to hit within the parameters of decent hitting catchers.  But neither is expected to be an ace defensively or, god forbid, throw out baserunners going to second. 

    I completely agree with starting Sizemore in CF because he is good field as well as good hit, but we also have to recognize he is likely to have durability issues.  Bradley on the other hand is an ace fielder in CF, a position that cries out for a great fielder, and he is as far as we know very durable.  But he is going to play for Pawtucket, not Boston, because his hitting is suspect.  Simple as that.  As good as Victorino is playing RF--maybe one of the two or three best the Sox have had out there--the Sox signed him with expectations he would hit, and he has.  Nava, Gomes, and Carp are the other three outfielders--the Sox are carrying five outfielders because two, Carp and Nava, can also play 1B--and none is a good fielder.  Heck, none is a good baserunner.  Was it last year when Nava was on 2B and failed to advance to 3B on a ball hit all the way to the wall in deep right field, a sure double and possible triple?  But that's OK because job one for Nava, which he does well, is to get on base, period.   

    Infield, same deal.  Napoli, Pedroia, Bogaerts, and Middlebrooks are all expected to hit first, field second even though none is a lousy fielder (I'm giving MBR the benefit of the doubt here). 

    And it's not just this year.  The Sox have always favored good hitters over good fielders, largely because they play at Fenway and know they must score to win.  The 2004 WS champs had I think a guy named Mueller who was hitting .287 and batted 8th.  That, sports fans, is a lineup. 

    Last year the Sox had a brilliant SS, Iglesias, and let him go to Detroit--who were thrilled to get him--to get a so-so starter, Peavy.  Fortunately, by then Drew was a very solid defensive SS--not brilliant, but very dependable--and a better  hitter.  But Iglesias was the SS of the future, assuming he could hit.  The problem was the Sox didn't think he would hit (and maybe they were nervous about the pains in his legs).  This year the Sox did not bring back that very reliable fielding SS Drew because they had/have a better hitting and younger model named Bogaerts. 

    We all know that Pedroia is one ferociously good fielder at 2B and has one more than one gold glove.  But forget that long-term contract if he weren't also a terrific hitter, good enough one year to win the AL MVP. 

    The single greatest player in Sox history was the embodiment of great hit, so-so field (by his own admission), Mr. Ted Williams, the splendid splinter (occasionally spitter). 

    So when Mr. Herrera meets new people and they ask him what he does for a living, he can brag he is the rarest of rarities, a Boston Red Sox designated non-hitter.  He made the squad because of his glove--to which a knowledgeable fan should say, "Wow.  I didn't think that was possible." 

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Max,

    In the end it's the sum of the parts that ultimately tip he scale for all position players. I think you're under estimating the value the Red Sox place on defense. All teams will start the better hitter at any position, as long as they can field the position and make the routine play, look routine. A players abilty to field his position is secondary to thier ability to hit at or above the league average for their respective positions. 

    [/QUOTE]

    Ever heard of Iglesias?  Tigers were ecstatic to get him--young with a great glove.  Sox dumped him to get Peavy.  Tigers were/are prepared to start iglesias at SS for a decade.  

    [/QUOTE]

    No, that's not true. That's not going to happen. We dodged a bullet IMO, and the RS know this. And it's not just his legs, which are incredibly important for playing SS. I think there's a personality problem that isn't a good fit in a clubhouse -- and we all know how that can play out.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    If Herrera can play multiple positions well, and run well, I think he will come in handy for the Sox.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Beantowne. Show Beantowne's posts

    Re: Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Beantowne's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to maxbialystock's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Named Herrera.  Everyone else among the 12 position players is expected to hit.  Even Ross and Pierzynski are expected to hit within the parameters of decent hitting catchers.  But neither is expected to be an ace defensively or, god forbid, throw out baserunners going to second. 

    I completely agree with starting Sizemore in CF because he is good field as well as good hit, but we also have to recognize he is likely to have durability issues.  Bradley on the other hand is an ace fielder in CF, a position that cries out for a great fielder, and he is as far as we know very durable.  But he is going to play for Pawtucket, not Boston, because his hitting is suspect.  Simple as that.  As good as Victorino is playing RF--maybe one of the two or three best the Sox have had out there--the Sox signed him with expectations he would hit, and he has.  Nava, Gomes, and Carp are the other three outfielders--the Sox are carrying five outfielders because two, Carp and Nava, can also play 1B--and none is a good fielder.  Heck, none is a good baserunner.  Was it last year when Nava was on 2B and failed to advance to 3B on a ball hit all the way to the wall in deep right field, a sure double and possible triple?  But that's OK because job one for Nava, which he does well, is to get on base, period.   

    Infield, same deal.  Napoli, Pedroia, Bogaerts, and Middlebrooks are all expected to hit first, field second even though none is a lousy fielder (I'm giving MBR the benefit of the doubt here). 

    And it's not just this year.  The Sox have always favored good hitters over good fielders, largely because they play at Fenway and know they must score to win.  The 2004 WS champs had I think a guy named Mueller who was hitting .287 and batted 8th.  That, sports fans, is a lineup. 

    Last year the Sox had a brilliant SS, Iglesias, and let him go to Detroit--who were thrilled to get him--to get a so-so starter, Peavy.  Fortunately, by then Drew was a very solid defensive SS--not brilliant, but very dependable--and a better  hitter.  But Iglesias was the SS of the future, assuming he could hit.  The problem was the Sox didn't think he would hit (and maybe they were nervous about the pains in his legs).  This year the Sox did not bring back that very reliable fielding SS Drew because they had/have a better hitting and younger model named Bogaerts. 

    We all know that Pedroia is one ferociously good fielder at 2B and has one more than one gold glove.  But forget that long-term contract if he weren't also a terrific hitter, good enough one year to win the AL MVP. 

    The single greatest player in Sox history was the embodiment of great hit, so-so field (by his own admission), Mr. Ted Williams, the splendid splinter (occasionally spitter). 

    So when Mr. Herrera meets new people and they ask him what he does for a living, he can brag he is the rarest of rarities, a Boston Red Sox designated non-hitter.  He made the squad because of his glove--to which a knowledgeable fan should say, "Wow.  I didn't think that was possible." 

     

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Max,

    In the end it's the sum of the parts that ultimately tip he scale for all position players. I think you're under estimating the value the Red Sox place on defense. All teams will start the better hitter at any position, as long as they can field the position and make the routine play, look routine. A players abilty to field his position is secondary to thier ability to hit at or above the league average for their respective positions. 

    [/QUOTE]

    Ever heard of Iglesias?  Tigers were ecstatic to get him--young with a great glove.  Sox dumped him to get Peavy.  Tigers were/are prepared to start iglesias at SS for a decade.  

    [/QUOTE]

    The Red Sox were happy to trade thier third best SS to aquire Peavy. If the Tigers had a choice between Bogaerts or Iglesias trust me they'd have taken Bogaerts....

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from hill55. Show hill55's posts

    Re: Sox pare roster down to one designated non-hitter . . .

    For what it's worth, last season Jonathan Herrera had a park-adjusted OPS+ of 83 in 215 plate appearances while Will Middlebrooks had an OPS+ of 88 in 374 plate appearances and Xander Bogaerts an OPS+ of 88 in 50 plate appearances.

    We'll see how this season unfolds.

     

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