Stan" the man"Musial passes away

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    Re: Stan

    Joe Posnanski wrote a nice tribute to Musial. He relates a quote by a political figure (gasp!) on the subject of age.

    "There was the story of John Kennedy, who became Musial's friend*. In 1962, at 41, Musial became a .330 hitter again, like he was reversing time. "They told me I was too young to be president and you were too old to be playing baseball," Kennedy said. "But we fooled them."'

    *Italics mine.

     
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    Re: Stan

    unfortunately, never got see to him play..RIP...STM

     
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    Re: Stan

    A few side facts, mostly due to a recent Bob Costas interview

     

    1)      He became a hitter by way of a coach's suggestion when he developed a sore shoulder, rendering him through as a Pitcher in the minors

    2)      He had a very unorthodox (â corkscrew) stance

    3)      He was coined "Stan The Man" by, of all people, Bklyn Dodger fans; he used to kill in Ebbets, but they liked him anyway, partly due to his acceptance of Jackie Robinson

    4)      He had  the same exact number of hits at home vs away (1,815), hit 331 lifetime

    5)      Between WWII and the steroid era; he was one of  3 players who had a season with a SLG Avg over 700 (1948) : Mantle & Williams were the others

    6)      He rarely struck out; and never struck out more than 51x in a season

    7)      Hit 330 with 19 HRs  at the age of 41 (turned 42 in Nov of that year, 1962)

    8)      Amazingly, the fickle ESPN (Top 50) & fans in 1999, left him off their lists (Him & Spahn were added in by the Commisioner). The guy is easily in the top 20.

    9)      Mantle was "told" by the NYY to claim DiMag was his idol, but it was really Musial

    10)   Has 2 statues outside of Busch Stadium

    11)   Rose broke his NL Hits record (despite missing time in WWII)

    12)   In his first 4  full seasons, won the pennant each time, and the WS 3 (including the Yankees only WS loss between 1927 and 1953; that's amazing in itself, considering its mostly a crapshoot)

    13)   Pre 1960s, St Louis was the western & southern outpost for MLB; as a result, half of the nation were Cardinal fans, and the games were carried by many radio stations; during games, one could see license plates  in  the parking lot from a bunch of states as a result

    14)   Was one of the few persons who ever lived who "nobody had a bad word to say about him"

    15)   Was never tossed from a game

    16)   Played "Take Me Out To The Ball Game" on his harmonica whenever he visited the HOF; usually in front of crowds, and other HOFers would sing along

    17)   Yogi Berra met his wife at Musial's restaurant, where she worked as a waitress

     
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    Re: Stan

    In response to Softlaw1's comment:

     

    10)   Has 2 statues outside of Busch Stadium

    Not his frault, but idolizing any person is disturbed. 

    14)   Was one of the few persons who ever lived who "nobody had a bad word to say about him"

    I'm sure someone who knew him has an unflattering word to say about him, but it won't be published in the mass media.

     



    10 - that would be true of all statues then

     

    14 - agree, but obviously a pretty good guy, as opposed to what we have for athletes today as a general rule

     
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  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from devildavid. Show devildavid's posts

    Re: Stan

    File:George Washington by Jean-Antoine Houdon - DSC05828.JPG

    Courtesy of the great state of North Carolina. Dedicated July 4, 1857.

     
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    Re: Stan

    In response to Softlaw1's comment:

    A man to be admired, but not idolized. The statue of George Washington does a disservice to his mortal life.

    However, let's not equate a man, depicted in his military uniform, who fought for the ideals stated in the Declaration of Indepndence and The Constitution, with a professional baseball player who played a child's game for money.



    A man is a man, no matter how he is dressed. Military leaders are no more sacred than other men. Washington is important more for his leadership than his military accomplishments. Any fool can win a war. Is Ghandi less of a great man because he waged a peaceful fight for Indian independence?

    It isn't the statue that shows men are disturbed, but what is in their hearts when they look at it. All statues are meant merely as remembrances of people who were admired. Were fans disturbed when they cheered Musial's exploits on the field? There is nothing wrong with a statue to remind one of greatness, no matter what field it was in.

     
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    Re: Stan

    In response to Softlaw1's comment:

    Any fool can win a war     False. And, George Washington was certainly no fool. As for "sacred", you inject bugaboo. George Washington is to be admired for his leadership, period, which can't be weighed and categorized.

    It isn't the statue that shows men are disturbed, but what is in their hearts when they look at it.

    Public display of statues of individual men is disturbed. It is a separate issue as to what is in the hearts of those who look at it.   

    All statues are meant merely as remembrances of people who were admired.

    False. Admiration and rememberance are only part of the pride and prejudice behind the act of commissioning the creation of a public display of a statue of an individual man. Of course, admiration isn't static and is a funciton of time and popularity of the times.

    Were fans disturbed when they cheered Musial's exploits on the field?

    Depends upon the state of mind of each fan.  

    There is nothing wrong with a statue to remind one of greatness, no matter what field it was in

    There is something wrong with a public display of a statue of an individual man. As for "greatness", no athlete is "great". And while no man is "great", when it comes to admiration, one should not equate public admiration for professional athletes to public admiration for George Washington.    

    By the way, George Washington is not very popular in this Nation, today. As happens with other public statues, I expect many of statues have already been removed or will be removed from the public squares of the body politic.



    Once again, you are wrong. there is nothing wrong with the public (or private) display of the statue of a man or woman. You take yourself way too seriously. There is no should or shouldn't when it comes to public (or private) admiration. People have the liberty to admire anyone they please. You can place your personal values on it, but your values are not universal values. Greatness is whatever each individual wants it to be. All things are relative. You may not like this, but it is a fact. Your attempt to make authoritative statements is a failure.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from nhsteven. Show nhsteven's posts

    Re: Stan

    In response to Softlaw1's comment:

    10 - that would be true of all statues then

     It's true of all statues that idolize individuals, not a statue, for example, of men erecting an American flag during a battle waged to stop totalitarianism

    14 - agree, but obviously a pretty good guy, as opposed to what we have for athletes today as a general rule

    Agree.

    My issue is that it was a diservice to the man to inject political identity politics and patronizing words from a long list of partisan politicians who represent terrible character. But this has become the monolithic calling card of social engineering and The "Great" Society.

     



    This list of "partisan politicians who represent terrible character"; you mean your list?

     
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  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from redsoxdirtdog. Show redsoxdirtdog's posts

    Re: Stan

    In response to Softlaw1's comment:

    TW was a stout Republican

    That might explain why the author of this political commentary called him "prickly". Clinton is as sleezy as they get. Ditto on JFK and LBJ. This wasn't an obituary, it was some media hack pridefully injecting his politics.

    I certainly hope that Musual would not approve of the federal identity politics and sleezy political characters being injected into this political commentary. If he approved it, he's more pathetic than surrounding himself with chidlen as a King's decree is used to violate the 2nd Amendment. 




    RICH :)  LOL

     
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    Re: Stan

     

    Given Stiffy's reference yesterday to MLK Day being "skin pigmentation celebration day," one is left wonderng what's in Stiffy's "HEART" when gazing upon this statue????

     

    Hmmmm???  I wonder????

     

     

     
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    Re: Stan

    Classic Stiffy!   ;)

     
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    Re: Stan

    Still waiting for your answer stiffy?

     
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