The game of baseball has changed over the years

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  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from youkillus. Show youkillus's posts

    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    Great post Yank. I love looking at stats from bygone times. My favorite historical team is the 1950 Red Sox. They scored an amaxing 1027 runs in just 154 games, without benefit of a DH. Among the regulars, Bobby Doerr had the lowest average at .294. 1B Walt Droppo led the team with just 75 strikeouts. Pitcher Mickey McDermott hit .364. Ted Williams, though injured compiled 28 HR's, 97 RBI in just 89 games. They won 94 games, but finished third.

     
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    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    Nolan Ryan's 383 strikeouts in 1973 has always been one of the real mind-boggling numbers for me.  That is one big number.  To get to that number he had to pitch 326 innings and average 10.6 strikeouts per game.

    Between 1972 and 1977, Ryan had at least 327 strikeouts 5 times in 6 seasons.  The only one he didn't was 1975, when injury limited him to a paltry 198 innings.

     
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    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    Baseball has changed, and maybe some of the changes not for the better.  But it's still a great game, always has been and always will be.

     
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    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    The strikeout seemed to be looked on as a "bad out" in the past also. Now it seems like no big deal, at least it wasn't a double play.

     
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    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    Good post but comparing baseball now to the post world war 2 era is not fair.  Most of the ball players went to war and again during the Korean War.  Baseball took a while to recover both talent wise and attendance after both wars.

    How about comparing today's pitching to The Sandy Koufax era.  This year's pitching seems to already a lot of high era's.  The one statement which best describe's Koufax's era is: " In the decade of the pitcher, Sandy was the pitcher of the decade."

     

     
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    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    Players are bigger and faster but not necessarily better prepared.

    It seems more pitchers get TJ surgery now but in the past maybe before they just pitched threw it until they no longer could.

    I read in an article that players played hurt because the money was better in baseball and easier than digging ditches.

    Most players today are smarter older and not just baseball players.

    Before many were HS grads maybe and baseball only guys. Back in the 50's and 60's in HS there hardly any guys that playerd multiple sports. I do not remember any at my HS.

    Just trying to say that there are many variables from one generation to another and very hard to say one was better than the other.

    Then do not forget that the pitchers mound is different.

     
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    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    In response to stapleton's comment:

    Of course Mickey Mantle played hurt...he was playing for a year to year contract.  He didn't play....next year's contract was not going to be so good......different era...whole different set of variables.  Better era for the players now.  If fans were players, they would want to play in this era....they wouldn't be so wistful for the "old days".




    Stapleturd you mental midget Mantle played injured because he was and he played as well as he could every minute he played he didn't play for a contract.

     
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    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    Is stapleton Pike, in a new phase one step closer to dementia?

     
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    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    In response to JimfromFlorida's comment:

    Players are bigger and faster but not necessarily better prepared.

    It seems more pitchers get TJ surgery now but in the past maybe before they just pitched threw it until they no longer could.

    I read in an article that players played hurt because the money was better in baseball and easier than digging ditches.

    Most players today are smarter older and not just baseball players.

    Before many were HS grads maybe and baseball only guys. Back in the 50's and 60's in HS there hardly any guys that playerd multiple sports. I do not remember any at my HS.

    Just trying to say that there are many variables from one generation to another and very hard to say one was better than the other.

    Then do not forget that the pitchers mound is different.




    I don't understand.  I graduated in '63 and lettered in three sports...baseball, basketball, and football...  I wasn't the only one.  The high school was decent size...about 600-700 students.

    Maybe I misundersood your post.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Rizzuto1965. Show Rizzuto1965's posts

    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    In response to youkillus' comment:

     

    Great post Yank. I love looking at stats from bygone times. My favorite historical team is the 1950 Red Sox. They scored an amaxing 1027 runs in just 154 games, without benefit of a DH. Among the regulars, Bobby Doerr had the lowest average at .294. 1B Walt Droppo led the team with just 75 strikeouts. Pitcher Mickey McDermott hit .364. Ted Williams, though injured compiled 28 HR's, 97 RBI in just 89 games. They won 94 games, but finished third.

     



    It is a very good post...unfortunately, it is plagiarized.   Whoever Yankenstein is, he pilfered this very post word-for-word from a Yankee forum (Scout.com) authored by a poster there.  I checked with the original poster (JW), and he confirmed  he has never frequented this site.  

     

    Attribution is more than a courtesy.  This is probably the same guy who was banned from the Scout.com Yankee forum for using multiple screen names, one of them "Yankenstein."  If he did it there, he is likely someone else here as well.

     

     
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    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    The game has changed alot since the 50's...4 man rotations....starting pitchers throwing 300+ innings per year...games being played in less than 2 hours. What changed....relief pitching became specialized and teams have a game plan of running up the pitch count and driving the starter out of the game. Free agency has also changed things ....power hitters get big money so everyone is looking to drive balls....that is part of the reason strike outs are way up. When you work counts you also put yourself at the discretion of the umpire...taking close pitches  means you are going to walk a lot and strike out...looking. In the 50's strike outs were viewed as not doing your job...and since contracts weren't guaranteed players didn't wait around looking for a pitch to drive...they put it in play. A starting pitcher who throws 200 innings in todays game probably throws pretty close to the same number of pitches as a pitcher that threw 300 innings in the 50's...they weren't supermen in the 50's...they just played  a different game.

     
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    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    Lowered and moved mound back, after Gibson's lowest ERA year. Made a huge difference. McClain won 30 that year. Pitching was dominant.
    Baseball knew the importance of Offense, for tickets.

     
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    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    In response to youkillus's comment:

     

    Great post Yank. I love looking at stats from bygone times. My favorite historical team is the 1950 Red Sox. They scored an amaxing 1027 runs in just 154 games, without benefit of a DH. Among the regulars, Bobby Doerr had the lowest average at .294. 1B Walt Droppo led the team with just 75 strikeouts. Pitcher Mickey McDermott hit .364. Ted Williams, though injured compiled 28 HR's, 97 RBI in just 89 games. They won 94 games, but finished third.

     




    That stunk for Williams he got hurt. I believe if he hit the 100 rbi (in which he would have), he would have had 10 years in a row 100 rbi's. One of the toughest things to do. Right up there with the 56 game hit streak, and .400 avg.

     

     
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    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    Mind boggling, what might have been, his greatest season.

    89 games, 28HRS, 97 RBI's.

     
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    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    In response to djcbuffum's comment:

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:

     

    Nolan Ryan's 383 strikeouts in 1973 has always been one of the real mind-boggling numbers for me.  That is one big number.  To get to that number he had to pitch 326 innings and [b]average 10.6 strikeouts per inning.[/b]

    Between 1972 and 1977, Ryan had at least 327 strikeouts 5 times in 6 seasons.  The only one he didn't was 1975, when injury limited him to a paltry 198 innings.

     



    LOL. You must mean 10.6 strikeouts per [i]game[/i].

     



    LOL..yikes...I fixed it.  Thanks for reading closely.  

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from youkillus. Show youkillus's posts

    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    In response to Rizzuto1965's comment:

    In response to youkillus' comment:

     

    Great post Yank. I love looking at stats from bygone times. My favorite historical team is the 1950 Red Sox. They scored an amaxing 1027 runs in just 154 games, without benefit of a DH. Among the regulars, Bobby Doerr had the lowest average at .294. 1B Walt Droppo led the team with just 75 strikeouts. Pitcher Mickey McDermott hit .364. Ted Williams, though injured compiled 28 HR's, 97 RBI in just 89 games. They won 94 games, but finished third.

     



    It is a very good post...unfortunately, it is plagiarized.   Whoever Yankenstein is, he pilfered this very post word-for-word from a Yankee forum (Scout.com) authored by a poster there.  I checked with the original poster (JW), and he confirmed  he has never frequented this site.  

     

    Attribution is more than a courtesy.  This is probably the same guy who was banned from the Scout.com Yankee forum for using multiple screen names, one of them "Yankenstein."  If he did it there, he is likely someone else here as well.

     




    Disgusting. Thanks for bringing it up. Because he didn't rebut your claim, I'll accept it as true, fat chance I'll go on A Yankee fan site to verify! Yankenstein, you're dead to me.

     
  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from Rizzuto1965. Show Rizzuto1965's posts

    Re: The game of baseball has changed over the years

    In response to youkillus' comment:

     

    In response to Rizzuto1965's comment:

     

    In response to youkillus' comment:

     

    Great post Yank. I love looking at stats from bygone times. My favorite historical team is the 1950 Red Sox. They scored an amaxing 1027 runs in just 154 games, without benefit of a DH. Among the regulars, Bobby Doerr had the lowest average at .294. 1B Walt Droppo led the team with just 75 strikeouts. Pitcher Mickey McDermott hit .364. Ted Williams, though injured compiled 28 HR's, 97 RBI in just 89 games. They won 94 games, but finished third.

     



    It is a very good post...unfortunately, it is plagiarized.   Whoever Yankenstein is, he pilfered this very post word-for-word from a Yankee forum (Scout.com) authored by a poster there.  I checked with the original poster (JW), and he confirmed  he has never frequented this site.  

     

    Attribution is more than a courtesy.  This is probably the same guy who was banned from the Scout.com Yankee forum for using multiple screen names, one of them "Yankenstein."  If he did it there, he is likely someone else here as well.

     

     




    Disgusting. Thanks for bringing it up. Because he didn't rebut your claim, I'll accept it as true, fat chance I'll go on A Yankee fan site to verify! Yankenstein, you're dead to me.

     

     



    You are very welcome.  I do not post often, but every now and again will check-in, curious of topics being discussed in Red Sox Nation, especially noting young players called up, minor league news, and Boston fans' opinions on all things in Yankeeland.  

    And, all baseball fans are welcome on the Scout.com Yankees' forum - Red Sox fans especially.  Just like here, as long as discussions are good-natured and baseball-oriented, everyone gets along.  It is only when posters, like the aforementioned plagiarist, pretend to be something they are not, initially, then cause problems down the road, that the atmosphere becomes toxic.

     

     
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