the Hammer has become the Nail...

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from slasher9. Show slasher9's posts

    the Hammer has become the Nail...

    whole story here:

    http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/10150907/the-new-normal-new-york-yankees

    The New Normal.

    Robinson Cano and Mariano Rivera are gone. Derek Jeter is old. It's time to accept that 2013 wasn't a fluke: The Yankees aren't good, and they aren't getting better.  

    After winning their third World Series in a decade, the Red Sox appear well positioned to keep their success going. They're not a particularly old team. Last season, David Ortiz was the only lineup regular older than 32. Dustin Pedroia, one of the best second basemen in baseball, signed an extraordinarily team-friendly eight-year, $110 million extension. Boston's farm system is one of the game's best: Jackie Bradley Jr. is ready to take over in center field for the departed Jacoby Ellsbury, while phenom Xander Bogaerts, who started every game of the World Series after playing just 18 games in the regular season, is slated to replace Stephen Drew at shortstop. The melding of money and talent, the "$100 million player development machine" that former Boston GM Theo Epstein talked about more than a decade ago, continues unabated in New England.

    Things in the Bronx are … not as great. As tempting as it might be to label 2013 a fluke and say the Yankees will soon return to winning 94 games every year, as they did in 11 of the previous 12 seasons, the evidence points in a different direction. Last season wasn't a fluke; it was the new normal for the Yankees, and nothing they've done this offseason changes that. If anything, the moves the Yankees have made this offseason seem guaranteed to perpetuate that reality.

     

    The Yankees were not a good team in 2013. Their Pythagorean record, an estimate of what their win-loss record should have been based on their runs scored and runs allowed,3 was 79-83. They won 85 games and stayed on the fringes of the playoff race for most of the year because of their incredible performance in one-run games, in which they were 30-16.

    Success in one-run games comes down to two parts luck and one part bullpen. Luck, as the Baltimore Orioles showed the last two seasons,4 is fleeting. As for the bullpen: The Yankees just lost the greatest reliever in baseball history to retirement. Good luck replicating that record next year, gentlemen.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from slasher9. Show slasher9's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    HAHAHAHAHA.

    Now, when Rodriguez misses time, Johnson or Nunez will likely fill in at third. Jeter will return for one more year at shortstop, and aside from turning 40, missing almost all of last season with an ankle injury, and playing poor defense for the last decade, this should go great. (On days when Johnson plays second base, he and Jeter will form one of the worst defensive middle infields you'll ever see on a putative contender.) The Yankees have signed Brendan Ryan as Jeter's caddie; Ryan is an absolute defensive whiz … and has hit .196/.268/.275 over the last two years. Teixeira should return to man first base, but he'll turn 34 in April and was in decline for three consecutive years before he missed almost all of last season. Soriano was excellent as the DH after coming over from the Cubs in 2013, but he'll be 38 during the 2014 season and was so bad in Chicago that the Cubs paid three-quarters of his salary just to get the Yankees to take him off their hands.

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from TheExaminer. Show TheExaminer's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    I hope this is right, but you know NYY, they are always lurking.....

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    In response to slasher9's comment:

    whole story here:

    http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/10150907/the-new-normal-new-york-yankees

    The New Normal.

    Robinson Cano and Mariano Rivera are gone. Derek Jeter is old. It's time to accept that 2013 wasn't a fluke: The Yankees aren't good, and they aren't getting better.  

    After winning their third World Series in a decade, the Red Sox appear well positioned to keep their success going. They're not a particularly old team. Last season, David Ortiz was the only lineup regular older than 32. Dustin Pedroia, one of the best second basemen in baseball, signed an extraordinarily team-friendly eight-year, $110 million extension. Boston's farm system is one of the game's best: Jackie Bradley Jr. is ready to take over in center field for the departed Jacoby Ellsbury, while phenom Xander Bogaerts, who started every game of the World Series after playing just 18 games in the regular season, is slated to replace Stephen Drew at shortstop. The melding of money and talent, the "$100 million player development machine" that former Boston GM Theo Epstein talked about more than a decade ago, continues unabated in New England.

    Things in the Bronx are … not as great. As tempting as it might be to label 2013 a fluke and say the Yankees will soon return to winning 94 games every year, as they did in 11 of the previous 12 seasons, the evidence points in a different direction. Last season wasn't a fluke; it was the new normal for the Yankees, and nothing they've done this offseason changes that. If anything, the moves the Yankees have made this offseason seem guaranteed to perpetuate that reality.

     

    The Yankees were not a good team in 2013. Their Pythagorean record, an estimate of what their win-loss record should have been based on their runs scored and runs allowed,3 was 79-83. They won 85 games and stayed on the fringes of the playoff race for most of the year because of their incredible performance in one-run games, in which they were 30-16.

    Success in one-run games comes down to two parts luck and one part bullpen. Luck, as the Baltimore Orioles showed the last two seasons,4 is fleeting. As for the bullpen: The Yankees just lost the greatest reliever in baseball history to retirement. Good luck replicating that record next year, gentlemen.



    LOVE IT! LOVE IT! LOVE IT!

    And with the new technology, they will actually have to finally play the game like everyone else with no help from their extra teammates behind the plate, and the bases. It will be interesting to see how that turns out for them with everyone finally watching.

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    Next up...hopefully...a salary cap. While I agree, it's worked against them more than for them, it has always been a crutch they rely on, and have always used to stock their team. Take that away and it's good times for a long time. IMO

    They may actually have to develop their own players, and they're starting from nothing.

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    It kind of feels like the Yankees are throwing darts at a dartboard with some of these signings they're making.

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    I beg your pardon slasher! I have done no such thing............. ;-)

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    I beg your pardon slasher! I have done no such thing............. ;-)



    LOL Hammah! No one would believe that. :)

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from garyhow. Show garyhow's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    In response to slasher9's comment:

    whole story here:

    http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/10150907/the-new-normal-new-york-yankees

    The New Normal.

    Robinson Cano and Mariano Rivera are gone. Derek Jeter is old. It's time to accept that 2013 wasn't a fluke: The Yankees aren't good, and they aren't getting better.  

    After winning their third World Series in a decade, the Red Sox appear well positioned to keep their success going. They're not a particularly old team. Last season, David Ortiz was the only lineup regular older than 32. Dustin Pedroia, one of the best second basemen in baseball, signed an extraordinarily team-friendly eight-year, $110 million extension. Boston's farm system is one of the game's best: Jackie Bradley Jr. is ready to take over in center field for the departed Jacoby Ellsbury, while phenom Xander Bogaerts, who started every game of the World Series after playing just 18 games in the regular season, is slated to replace Stephen Drew at shortstop. The melding of money and talent, the "$100 million player development machine" that former Boston GM Theo Epstein talked about more than a decade ago, continues unabated in New England.

    Things in the Bronx are … not as great. As tempting as it might be to label 2013 a fluke and say the Yankees will soon return to winning 94 games every year, as they did in 11 of the previous 12 seasons, the evidence points in a different direction. Last season wasn't a fluke; it was the new normal for the Yankees, and nothing they've done this offseason changes that. If anything, the moves the Yankees have made this offseason seem guaranteed to perpetuate that reality.

     

    The Yankees were not a good team in 2013. Their Pythagorean record, an estimate of what their win-loss record should have been based on their runs scored and runs allowed,3 was 79-83. They won 85 games and stayed on the fringes of the playoff race for most of the year because of their incredible performance in one-run games, in which they were 30-16.

    Success in one-run games comes down to two parts luck and one part bullpen. Luck, as the Baltimore Orioles showed the last two seasons,4 is fleeting. As for the bullpen: The Yankees just lost the greatest reliever in baseball history to retirement. Good luck replicating that record next year, gentlemen.




    Would agree with most everything you said! The RS have a bright future and IMO could easily win another 3 in the next 10 yrs. While I said it before, Cash will be gone before Ells new contract runs out. 2 large market teams w/ 2 very different approaches to building a roster. RS from within adding some pieces from FA to build a WS contender, the Yanks under Cashman have become a sign the biggest name lose the draft pick and then throw more $ at any problems that might arise.

    Cash inherited a roster that was built by Gene Michael [a great talent evaluator]. One that included a roster of young either close to or HOF caliber talent in Mo / Jeter/ Bernie/ Petitte/ Posada a pretty good nucleus to start with? Cash did add some high $ help Clemens, etc... and win a bunch of WS's. Now under Cash's control the Yanks have not developed any young talent worth mention, Int FA [Cano/Wang] came down to who had the most $ under old system [Kudos to Bud] But credit for that Yankee dynasty should go to G.Michael. Cash can and should only credit 09 as his, he won with Michaels talent and all the $ he spent on Tex / CC / Burnett.

    The RS on the other hand have become the talent producing farm system that Theo predicted. Credit should go to the top in John Henry, this is someone as a fan you have to love as your owner. He wanted to build something that was sustainable for many years and looks like he is suceeding. They went off track for a couple of yrs while trying to feed the moster so to speak, but seems they have found there way again!

     

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    I beg your pardon slasher! I have done no such thing............. ;-)



    LOL Hammah! No one would believe that. :)


    Ha! yeah Kim I know. I got a good chuckle at the thread title myself........are you local to boston Kim? the reason I ask is my commute last night was almost 3 hours......damn snow.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    I beg your pardon slasher! I have done no such thing............. ;-)



    LOL Hammah! No one would believe that. :)


    Ha! yeah Kim I know. I got a good chuckle at the thread title myself........are you local to boston Kim? the reason I ask is my commute last night was almost 3 hours......damn snow.



    I'll never tell. :) I have enough people aggravated with me on here where I don't want to position myself so much. lol

    Having said that, I hope we do meet up one day. I think we would have a blast. There's a few posters here I wouldn't mind meeting up with.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from bosox0489. Show bosox0489's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...


    Put the first pitch in ellsburys ear hole 98/ mph     GO SOX!

     

                                         Steve bosox since 1946  semper fi.

     

     

     

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    In response to bosox0489's comment:


    Put the first pitch in ellsburys ear hole 98/ mph     GO SOX!

     

                                         Steve bosox since 1946  semper fi.

     

     

     



    Don't say that, and don't put semper fi after it. That's disrespectful to everyone who would never agree with you.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    In response to bosox0489's comment:


    Put the first pitch in ellsburys ear hole 98/ mph     GO SOX!

     

                                         Steve bosox since 1946  semper fi.

     

     

     



    sorry bulldog! I know your only kidding. however, that said I don't shiv a git who the opposing player is. 98 mph in someone's ear is just simply wrong. Just imagine what would have possibly happened if Tony C didn't get hit in his face eh? the possibilities man.
    are you sure that you were a marine?

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from slasher9. Show slasher9's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    I beg your pardon slasher! I have done no such thing............. ;-)




    hahaha.  no man.  Hammah will ALWAYS be the Hammah!!!!!

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    I beg your pardon slasher! I have done no such thing............. ;-)



    LOL Hammah! No one would believe that. :)

    yeah, because a nail isn't as dull Tongue Out


     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hammah29r2. Show Hammah29r2's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    In response to jete02fan's comment:

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    I beg your pardon slasher! I have done no such thing............. ;-)



    LOL Hammah! No one would believe that. :)

    yeah, because a nail isn't as dull Tongue Out



    BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!! gonna getcha for that one "B"

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from craze4sox. Show craze4sox's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    In response to slasher9's comment:

     

    HAHAHAHAHA.

    Now, when Rodriguez misses time, Johnson or Nunez will likely fill in at third. Jeter will return for one more year at shortstop, and aside from turning 40, missing almost all of last season with an ankle injury, and playing poor defense for the last decade, this should go great. (On days when Johnson plays second base, he and Jeter will form one of the worst defensive middle infields you'll ever see on a putative contender.) The Yankees have signed Brendan Ryan as Jeter's caddie; Ryan is an absolute defensive whiz … and has hit .196/.268/.275 over the last two years. Teixeira should return to man first base, but he'll turn 34 in April and was in decline for three consecutive years before he missed almost all of last season. Soriano was excellent as the DH after coming over from the Cubs in 2013, but he'll be 38 during the 2014 season and was so bad in Chicago that the Cubs paid three-quarters of his salary just to get the Yankees to take him off their hands.

     



    If the the Yankees can land one or two more capable starters their offense should keep them in the race.  It's great they continue to make crazy (long term) deals and struggle to build their farm but don't think for a minute they won't score runs or have enough veteran bench players to pick up the slack if someone goes down.

     

    Counting the Yankees out of the race in 2014 is as silly as some Sox fans thinking JBJ and Middy will help our cause next season enough to erase the loss of Jacoby's offense and Drews defense.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from jete02fan. Show jete02fan's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    In response to jete02fan's comment:

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    I beg your pardon slasher! I have done no such thing............. ;-)



    LOL Hammah! No one would believe that. :)

    yeah, because a nail isn't as dull Tongue Out



    BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!! gonna getcha for that one "B"

    LOL....i said that the second i finished typing :-)


     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from donrd4. Show donrd4's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    In response to garyhow's comment:

    In response to slasher9's comment:

    whole story here:

    http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/10150907/the-new-normal-new-york-yankees

    The New Normal.

    Robinson Cano and Mariano Rivera are gone. Derek Jeter is old. It's time to accept that 2013 wasn't a fluke: The Yankees aren't good, and they aren't getting better.  

    After winning their third World Series in a decade, the Red Sox appear well positioned to keep their success going. They're not a particularly old team. Last season, David Ortiz was the only lineup regular older than 32. Dustin Pedroia, one of the best second basemen in baseball, signed an extraordinarily team-friendly eight-year, $110 million extension. Boston's farm system is one of the game's best: Jackie Bradley Jr. is ready to take over in center field for the departed Jacoby Ellsbury, while phenom Xander Bogaerts, who started every game of the World Series after playing just 18 games in the regular season, is slated to replace Stephen Drew at shortstop. The melding of money and talent, the "$100 million player development machine" that former Boston GM Theo Epstein talked about more than a decade ago, continues unabated in New England.

    Things in the Bronx are … not as great. As tempting as it might be to label 2013 a fluke and say the Yankees will soon return to winning 94 games every year, as they did in 11 of the previous 12 seasons, the evidence points in a different direction. Last season wasn't a fluke; it was the new normal for the Yankees, and nothing they've done this offseason changes that. If anything, the moves the Yankees have made this offseason seem guaranteed to perpetuate that reality.

     

    The Yankees were not a good team in 2013. Their Pythagorean record, an estimate of what their win-loss record should have been based on their runs scored and runs allowed,3 was 79-83. They won 85 games and stayed on the fringes of the playoff race for most of the year because of their incredible performance in one-run games, in which they were 30-16.

    Success in one-run games comes down to two parts luck and one part bullpen. Luck, as the Baltimore Orioles showed the last two seasons,4 is fleeting. As for the bullpen: The Yankees just lost the greatest reliever in baseball history to retirement. Good luck replicating that record next year, gentlemen.




    Would agree with most everything you said! The RS have a bright future and IMO could easily win another 3 in the next 10 yrs. While I said it before, Cash will be gone before Ells new contract runs out. 2 large market teams w/ 2 very different approaches to building a roster. RS from within adding some pieces from FA to build a WS contender, the Yanks under Cashman have become a sign the biggest name lose the draft pick and then throw more $ at any problems that might arise.

    Cash inherited a roster that was built by Gene Michael [a great talent evaluator]. One that included a roster of young either close to or HOF caliber talent in Mo / Jeter/ Bernie/ Petitte/ Posada a pretty good nucleus to start with? Cash did add some high $ help Clemens, etc... and win a bunch of WS's. Now under Cash's control the Yanks have not developed any young talent worth mention, Int FA [Cano/Wang] came down to who had the most $ under old system [Kudos to Bud] But credit for that Yankee dynasty should go to G.Michael. Cash can and should only credit 09 as his, he won with Michaels talent and all the $ he spent on Tex / CC / Burnett.

    The RS on the other hand have become the talent producing farm system that Theo predicted. Credit should go to the top in John Henry, this is someone as a fan you have to love as your owner. He wanted to build something that was sustainable for many years and looks like he is suceeding. They went off track for a couple of yrs while trying to feed the moster so to speak, but seems they have found there way again!

     



    Talent producing farm systen... Ido agree with you on that.. Also i believe that 80% of the posters on here would rather trade our talent for some million dollar  player that other teams are trying to dump. Just plain stupid, That shows you what they all know about nothing.Trade trade trade... get over it !!! Bring in the kids and let them be our future.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from redsoxfan94. Show redsoxfan94's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    Can't ever count the yanks out, but some of the moves they have made this offseason leave much to be desired, especially overpaying for Ells and letting Cano go. 

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from SpacemanEephus. Show SpacemanEephus's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    In response to redsoxfan94's comment:

    Can't ever count the yanks out, but some of the moves they have made this offseason leave much to be desired, especially overpaying for Ells and letting Cano go. 



    Yeah, so far - so meh from the Empire.  BUT, if they manage to land Tanaka, the rest of the moves start to look a lot better.

     
  23. You have chosen to ignore posts from SleeStack1. Show SleeStack1's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    Honestly, I think you can't count the Yanks out in the same vein that you can't count any other team in baseball out.  But absolutely no more respectful consideration.

     

     
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  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: the Hammer has become the Nail...

    In response to jete02fan's comment:

    In response to kimsaysthis' comment:

    In response to Hammah29r2's comment:

    I beg your pardon slasher! I have done no such thing............. ;-)



    LOL Hammah! No one would believe that. :)

    yeah, because a nail isn't as dull Tongue Out




    Uh oh, Jete. You're in trouble now! LOL

     
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