The SLAP TAG

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from youkillus. Show youkillus's posts

    The SLAP TAG

    Are players so bereft of technical knowledge or indifferent to doing their job correctly? I'm talking about the slap tag, especially at 2B on steals and attempted doubles. The runner slides in, the defender slaps a tag down, and raises his glove triumphantly, meanwhile the runner's momentum carries him off the bag, and if the defender would simply keep his glove on the runner, he would be recording an out. I'm watching the Tigers game, and Prince Fielder slugged one off the wall, Michael Bourn of the Indians made a brilliant throw to second, Fielder slides in ahead of the slap, and had to hold on for dear life, bear hugging the bag. The throw was amazing, the effort by Fielder was extrordinary to stay in contact with the bag, and the infielder's laissez faire effort was in line with what I see the Sox doing constantly.

     So why the slap tag? Let's get some outs!

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Sheriff-Rojas. Show Sheriff-Rojas's posts

    Re: The SLAP TAG

    In response to youkillus' comment:

    Are players so bereft of technical knowledge or indifferent to doing their job correctly? I'm talking about the slap tag, especially at 2B on steals and attempted doubles. The runner slides in, the defender slaps a tag down, and raises his glove triumphantly, meanwhile the runner's momentum carries him off the bag, and if the defender would simply keep his glove on the runner, he would be recording an out. I'm watching the Tigers game, and Prince Fielder slugged one off the wall, Michael Bourn of the Indians made a brilliant throw to second, Fielder slides in ahead of the slap, and had to hold on for dear life, bear hugging the bag. The throw was amazing, the effort by Fielder was extrordinary to stay in contact with the bag, and the infielder's laissez faire effort was in line with what I see the Sox doing constantly.

     So why the slap tag? Let's get some outs!

     



    The fielder placing the tag has to first focus on catching the baseball and is not contemplating options.  It's often a bang/bang play where they have to react.  The alert player with quick reflexes can sometimes do both (place a slap tag and tag the player after the slide).  Dustin Pedroia comes to mind.  

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Beantowne. Show Beantowne's posts

    Re: The SLAP TAG

    In response to Sheriff-Rojas' comment:

    In response to youkillus' comment:

    [QUOTE]

     

    Are players so bereft of technical knowledge or indifferent to doing their job correctly? I'm talking about the slap tag, especially at 2B on steals and attempted doubles. The runner slides in, the defender slaps a tag down, and raises his glove triumphantly, meanwhile the runner's momentum carries him off the bag, and if the defender would simply keep his glove on the runner, he would be recording an out. I'm watching the Tigers game, and Prince Fielder slugged one off the wall, Michael Bourn of the Indians made a brilliant throw to second, Fielder slides in ahead of the slap, and had to hold on for dear life, bear hugging the bag. The throw was amazing, the effort by Fielder was extrordinary to stay in contact with the bag, and the infielder's laissez faire effort was in line with what I see the Sox doing constantly.

     So why the slap tag? Let's get some outs!

     

     



    The fielder placing the tag has to first focus on catching the baseball and is not contemplating options.  It's often a bang/bang play where they have to react.  The alert player with quick reflexes can sometimes do both (place a slap tag and tag the player after the slide).  Dustin Pedroia comes to mind.  

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Why the slap tag...first off the guy coming in has cleats on and depending on how much time the fielder has to catch and apply the tag dictates the tecnique, most of the time when the fielder use the slap tag is when recieving the throw and has to make a quick move to catch it and apply the tag. why the the fielder raises his glove after applying the tag is to demonstrate to the umpire that he has control of the ball. 

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from georom4. Show georom4's posts

    Re: The SLAP TAG

    im not totally getting this conversation...tags are made based on all sorts of factors from runners speed/direction to ball location....you catch the ball and try to tage the guy before he touches the bag....am i missing something?

    As always - 100% correct!

     
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac35. Show pinstripezac35's posts

    Re: The SLAP TAG

    In response to georom4's comment:

    im not totally getting this conversation...tags are made based on all sorts of factors from runners speed/direction to ball location....you catch the ball and try to tage the guy before he touches the bag....am i missing something?

    As always - 100% correct!

     




    I think youks point is

    what happens after that, and I agree that

    to many middle inf go for that o'lay type slap tag

    and fail to keep the glove on the player once he has touched 2B

    jeter has been a master of keeping the glove down and getting the call

    when the runner over slides the bag for that 1 or 2 seconds

     

    gardner gets away with it all the time

    his hand touches the bag

    but his momentum keeps him going past the bag

    and there's a moment when he has no contact with the bag before his foot gets there

     
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  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from S5. Show S5's posts

    Re: The SLAP TAG

    Did you guys ever play MI positions?   This is all dependent on where the ball gets to the base.  If the catcher throws the ball so it comes about a foot off the ground and on the 1B side of the bag there is no "slap tag".  The 2B catches the ball and holds it there, and the runner slides into it.

    It's when the ball is anyplace else that the "slap tag" comes into play.  The farther the ball is from the base the quicker the IF has to move his arm to get the ball to the base in time to tag the runner.  It's the momentum of the arm coming down that makes it look like a "slap tag".   The farther the ball is from the bag the more momentum the arm has, making it more difficult to stop the glove right in front of the bag.  Hence the "slap tag".   

    Having the right to do something doesn't make it the right thing to do.

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac35. Show pinstripezac35's posts

    Re: The SLAP TAG

    In response to S5's comment:

     

    Did you guys ever play MI positions?   This is all dependent on where the ball gets to the base.  If the catcher throws the ball so it comes about a foot off the ground and on the 1B side of the bag there is no "slap tag".  The 2B catches the ball and holds it there, and the runner slides into it.

    It's when the ball is anyplace else that the "slap tag" comes into play.  The farther the ball is from the base the quicker the IF has to move his arm to get the ball to the base in time to tag the runner.  It's the momentum of the arm coming down that makes it look like a "slap tag".   The farther the ball is from the bag the more momentum the arm has, making it more difficult to stop the glove right in front of the bag.  Hence the "slap tag".   

    Having the right to do something doesn't make it the right thing to do.

     




     

     more difficult or impossible to stop

    R U really arguing there aren't players who could improve their control

    I'm thinking sure sometimes they can't hold the tag

    but there are times when they aren't even trying

    perhaps some MA non contact sparring could help

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from S5. Show S5's posts

    Re: The SLAP TAG

    In response to pinstripezac35's comment:

    In response to S5's comment:

     

    Did you guys ever play MI positions?   This is all dependent on where the ball gets to the base.  If the catcher throws the ball so it comes about a foot off the ground and on the 1B side of the bag there is no "slap tag".  The 2B catches the ball and holds it there, and the runner slides into it.

    It's when the ball is anyplace else that the "slap tag" comes into play.  The farther the ball is from the base the quicker the IF has to move his arm to get the ball to the base in time to tag the runner.  It's the momentum of the arm coming down that makes it look like a "slap tag".   The farther the ball is from the bag the more momentum the arm has, making it more difficult to stop the glove right in front of the bag.  Hence the "slap tag".   

    Having the right to do something doesn't make it the right thing to do.

     more difficult or impossible to stop

    R U really arguing there aren't players who could improve their control

    I'm thinking sure sometimes they can't hold the tag

    but there are times when they aren't even trying

    perhaps some MA non contact sparring could help



    Whether it's "more difficult" or "impossible" has a lot to do with where the throw was.  If the throw was knee-high there's no need for a sweep tag but if the throw is at the height of the 2B/SS head and the play is going to be close it may be impossible to get the ball to the bag in time AND stop it there.

    There's too much that goes into this to paint everyone with the same brush.  Ideally and with a perfect throw there is no sweep tag but the farther from perfect that throw is the more need there is for the sweep.

    Look, I'm not saying that some MIf's don't like to showboat with that tag - some most certainly do.  Even *I* have to say that sometimes a MI will try to "sell" the tag by making a sweep tag and then holding the ball over their head.  All I'm saying is that with the fundamentally solid IF's the sweep only happens when it's necessary and the longer the sweep the more difficult (toward impossible) it is to stop the ball in front of the bag. 

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from pinstripezac35. Show pinstripezac35's posts

    Re: The SLAP TAG

     

    Look, I'm not saying that some MIf's don't like to showboat with that tag - some most certainly do.  Even *I* have to say that sometimes a MI will try to "sell" the tag by making a sweep tag and then holding the ball over their head.  All I'm saying is that with the fundamentally solid IF's the sweep only happens when it's necessary and the longer the sweep the more difficult (toward impossible) it is to stop the ball in front of the bag.

     

     

    fair enough S5

    I wasn't talkin about all mid inf

    only that some  could improve

     

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from maxbialystock. Show maxbialystock's posts

    Re: The SLAP TAG

    OP could be right, but most guys going into second manage to stay on the bag, so the odds would seem to favor the slap tag for its selling potential.    I know it worked at least once against Ellsbury who was in fact safe by the slap tag sold the ump on the out. 

     
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