Two Seldom Discussed Hitting Tips from Ted W.

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from bosoxmal. Show bosoxmal's posts

    Two Seldom Discussed Hitting Tips from Ted W.

    I saw Williams play maybe 15 to 20 games, live, and maybe twice that many on TV. He had one trait that never gets talked about: He seldom stepped out of the batter's box between pitches. No messing with the batting gloves because he didn't wear any batting gloves. (The first days of spring training were mostly for toughening up the hands).


    I also remember reading somewhere that many hitter did not understand the "plane of the swing". It wasn't flat, he said, and not an uppercut. It was whatever the plane of the ball was taking.


    My point is: Do the Red Sox players pay attention to what made the great hitter, great hitters? I wonder.

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from georom4. Show georom4's posts

    Re: Two Seldom Discussed Hitting Tips from Ted W.

    i read some amazing stuff about TW's eyes and his ability to see the ball in slow motion and know which seam he hit the bat with - however fwiw i read something recently about hitting and this new study claims that seeing it like Williams is impossible - they argue that the best hitters are simply better at predicting which direction the ball will take based on the pitchers movement...this could explain the success of non-flamethrowing pitchers with "movement"...(koji)


     


    here is the link


     


    http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/issue.aspx?id=962&y=0&no=&content=true&page=2&css=print

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from dannycater. Show dannycater's posts

    Re: Two Seldom Discussed Hitting Tips from Ted W.

    Most of the best hitters had fantastic beyond just 20-20 vision...Let's blame Mike Hargrove for permanently ending fast at bats. The Human Rain Delay had to adjust everything between pitches out of the box (hell, Nomar did a fast version of MH). But that's exactly right about plane of the ball and the swing...if you go down to reach a low pitch, it's your body coming down and the swing is just coming from a lower plane. Same thing when you go for the outside pitch and drive it to LF or opposite field hitting in general. The body adjusts turns, left or right, or low or high, and then the swing is on the plane of where the ball is pitched...But can we stop using Teddy Ballgame as a way for Jackie Bradley Jr to suddenly learn how to hit? This goes back to the Fire Greg Colbrunn parade. A good batting coach can only do so much and a bad hitter can only improve so much. A good hitter could become a great hitter with a good coach, that's how the progression goes. If you can't hit MLB pitching, you simply lose your job. Survival of the Fittest.

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from dannycater. Show dannycater's posts

    Re: Two Seldom Discussed Hitting Tips from Ted W.

    And bosoxmal, I envy that you got to see Teddy BG in person hitting the baseball...what a treat. 

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from wonderdrums. Show wonderdrums's posts

    Re: Two Seldom Discussed Hitting Tips from Ted W.

    In response to bosoxmal's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I saw Williams play maybe 15 to 20 games, live, and maybe twice that many on TV. He had one trait that never gets talked about: He seldom stepped out of the batter's box between pitches. No messing with the batting gloves because he didn't wear any batting gloves. (The first days of spring training were mostly for toughening up the hands).

     

    I also remember reading somewhere that many hitter did not understand the "plane of the swing". It wasn't flat, he said, and not an uppercut. It was whatever the plane of the ball was taking.

     

    My point is: Do the Red Sox players pay attention to what made the great hitter, great hitters? I wonder.

    [/QUOTE]

    As a kid, I read The Science of Hitting by Ted W and I learned something new from it every time I read it. It is an outstanding read on several levels. Ultimately I realized that it came down to essentially one thing. See the ball- hit the ball. As DannyCater stated simply, if you can't hit pitching you lose your job. Go Sox!

     
  6. You have chosen to ignore posts from dannycater. Show dannycater's posts

    Re: Two Seldom Discussed Hitting Tips from Ted W.

    wonder, I still play in a plus-35 league and every time someone talks about hitting that line comes out every time---see the ball, hit the ball...it sounds so simple and yet it's so hard for many...Stance and approach is so important...For me, once I found a stance I liked, it changed everything for me. Repetition like anything makes hitting like a routine...it's like anything really. It's just that the moment you face a pitcher with good stuff, good sliders, great sequences inside and outside, that's when the ability to hit gets tested. Everyone can hit a fastball down the middle (well most baseball guys can). Most can't hit a breaking ball to save themselves. Changing speeds, they can't be patient, so the batter trips himself up. 

     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from dannycater. Show dannycater's posts

    Re: Two Seldom Discussed Hitting Tips from Ted W.

    You then put all that at the MLB level, and that's how a JBJr can look so overmatched....

     
  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from dannycater. Show dannycater's posts

    Re: Two Seldom Discussed Hitting Tips from Ted W.

    Taking pitches is more about confidence than it is strategy....Guys who don't have confidence, don't take pitches much...They are afraid to fall behind in the count.

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from dannycater. Show dannycater's posts

    Re: Two Seldom Discussed Hitting Tips from Ted W.

    Mike Napoli is a guy comfortable in his skin. He takes pitches and takes a lot of strike 3 calls too. It never phases him, and he ultimately has good enough numbers by season's end. He can be maddening, but when he is on like he was in the '13 season, you can see how important a guy who draws counts out can be.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from bosoxmal. Show bosoxmal's posts

    Re: Two Seldom Discussed Hitting Tips from Ted W.

    In response to dannycater's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    And bosoxmal, I envy that you got to see Teddy BG in person hitting the baseball...what a treat. 

    [/QUOTE]


    Yes, it was. And we knew it then! In 1950-51, I worked at a company located on Rt 1 in Norwood. On days when a game was televised a few of us would scoot down the road to a restaurant where the game would on (over the bar). We'd get a hot dog and a beer, hang there until Williams came to bat, then go back to work. I was in the Army from early 1943 to September 1948, but took my new wife to Fenway in late September to see a game in which both Williams and Joe DiMaggio played. I can't remmber where I put my shoes half the time, but those things you never forget.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from bosoxmal. Show bosoxmal's posts

    Re: Two Seldom Discussed Hitting Tips from Ted W.

    In response to dannycater's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Taking pitches is more about confidence than it is strategy....Guys who don't have confidence, don't take pitches much...They are afraid to fall behind in the count.

    [/QUOTE]


    True; but if you let a 1st pitch down the shoot cookie go by for strike one, you're probably hitting far fewer home runs and for a much lower BA than if you swung away. Williams didn't take pitches just to run the count. He took them because they were not what he was looking for. There are more home runs hit on the first pitch than on any other pitch. If a pitcher threw a first pitch fastball down the middle to Williams, it got hammered. He would also look for the pitch that this particular pitcher used to get him out. Because, he often said, "wait, wait, wait---quick, quick, quick."

    I was really encouraged, last night, when Garagiola, in talking about Craig, before his injury, he probably waited as long as anyone in baseball before swinging.

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from dannycater. Show dannycater's posts

    Re: Two Seldom Discussed Hitting Tips from Ted W.

    bosox, but a lot of times guys don't get the fastball down the middle for pitch 1...the game has changed. Most got ahead of the count earlier in Williams' era (and even as late as 1990s) with hittable fastballs. Now you can expect pretty much anything for pitch 1...and that's where the pitcher outwits the hitter. And I agree with you that you don't take the fastball down the middle to stretch the count, if you are sitting on it as they say--you go after it. But if you are not ready, which happens sometimes for some hitters, then you may just take a strike to get yourself prepared for a longer at-bat. Confidence being a key to that scenario.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from dannycater. Show dannycater's posts

    Re: Two Seldom Discussed Hitting Tips from Ted W.

    I enjoy these type of threads more than anything else. I love talking fundamental baseball not as much about FireSales and ChickenBeerGates and why a kid should not be in the big leagues for one tool.

     
  14. You have chosen to ignore posts from slasher9. Show slasher9's posts

    Re: Two Seldom Discussed Hitting Tips from Ted W.

    In response to dannycater's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Taking pitches is more about confidence than it is strategy....Guys who don't have confidence, don't take pitches much...They are afraid to fall behind in the count.

    [/QUOTE]

    how you take a pitch is important too.  are you tracking the ball from the pitchers hand all the way to the catchers mitt?  are you recognizing pitch type / speed / location?  it's an art.  and like most arts - repitition and practice is what separate the "good" from the "masters". 

    if you are constantly changing your stance/viewing angle it is very hard to have repitition and recognition...

    other names i have posted under:  none

     

     
  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from dannycater. Show dannycater's posts

    Re: Two Seldom Discussed Hitting Tips from Ted W.

    Boggs did that, watched the ball completely into the glove. Few people do that.

     
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