What are you reading?

  1. You have chosen to ignore posts from bosoxmal. Show bosoxmal's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I read the Montville bio of Ted Williams.  I seem to be in the minority on this, but I found the story of Ted Williams to be a little sad and depressing.  In spite of all his on-the-field success, Williams did not seem to me to be a happy person.  There was a lot of frustration in his baseball career, with the heartbreaking losses in 1946, 1948 and 1949 and his own failures in his one WS appearance.  And the beating he took from the Boston press was just horrific.  We might think there is negativity in the Boston sports press now, but it's got nothing on what Williams went through. 

    Williams' personal life also struck me as a bit sad.  At the end of the day I got the feeling that his happiest times were when he was retired and 'gone fishing' to his heart's content.

    [/QUOTE]Back about 40+ years ago, my wife and I walked into the Hancock (NH) Inn dining room. It was empty except for two guys at a small window table. Around Thanksgiving time, and cold. We had a sandwich, and before we finished up, I went to the john. On the way back, I stopped by his table, and said thanks for all the great memories. We had a few words about nothing. When we got ready to leave, the waitress came over and told me that TW had picked up our check. Somehow his shotarming the the left field stands didn't seem very important.

    As I recall, it was Cashman and, even, Bill Cunningham who were his worst "press". Any of that in the bios?

     

     
  2. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    In response to ampoule's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I could never understand reading works of fiction.  I know that it is not real, so I have a problem connecting with it.

    [/QUOTE]

    I feel the same....non-fiction only.

    [/QUOTE]

    No fictional TV shows or movies either?

     
  3. You have chosen to ignore posts from Hfxsoxnut. Show Hfxsoxnut's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    In response to bosoxmal's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Back about 40+ years ago, my wife and I walked into the Hancock (NH) Inn dining room. It was empty except for two guys at a small window table. Around Thanksgiving time, and cold. We had a sandwich, and before we finished up, I went to the john. On the way back, I stopped by his table, and said thanks for all the great memories. We had a few words about nothing. When we got ready to leave, the waitress came over and told me that TW had picked up our check. Somehow his shotarming the the left field stands didn't seem very important.

    As I recall, it was Cashman and, even, Bill Cunningham who were his worst "press". Any of that in the bios?

    [/QUOTE]

    The guy that stands out in the Montville bio was Dave 'The Colonel' Egan.  I came to hate this guy.  A real Knight of the Keyboard.

     

     
  4. You have chosen to ignore posts from bosoxmal. Show bosoxmal's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to bosoxmal's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Back about 40+ years ago, my wife and I walked into the Hancock (NH) Inn dining room. It was empty except for two guys at a small window table. Around Thanksgiving time, and cold. We had a sandwich, and before we finished up, I went to the john. On the way back, I stopped by his table, and said thanks for all the great memories. We had a few words about nothing. When we got ready to leave, the waitress came over and told me that TW had picked up our check. Somehow his shotarming the the left field stands didn't seem very important.

    As I recall, it was Cashman and, even, Bill Cunningham who were his worst "press". Any of that in the bios?

    [/QUOTE]

    The guy that stands out in the Montville bio was Dave 'The Colonel' Egan.  I came to hate this guy.  A real Knight of the Keyboard.

     

    [/QUOTE]


    Golly, how could I forget Egan! I wonder how he hung on so long. He was with the American, right?

     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from NLU75. Show NLU75's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    In response to youkillus's comment:

    In response to antibody's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Currently reading two. Team of Rivals (The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln) byDoris Kearns Goodwin and Stormy Weather by Carl Hiaasen. I've read one book by James Lee Burke, a Robichaux novel, and would like to read more.



    Burke is great, the telling of long time social injustice in La is in stark contrast to the dream world of Duck Dynasty.

    [/QUOTE] The  Last Gunfight Jeff Guinn about the gunfight at the OK Corral & to ride shoot straight & speak the truth by Jeff Cooper


     
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  8. You have chosen to ignore posts from billge. Show billge's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    If you like crime and mystery, the Scandanavians have some great writers. Obviously Stieg Larsen or my favorite Jo Nesbo is great.  Also Jussi adler Olsen,  Hakan Nesser and Henning Mankell are all excellent

     
  9. You have chosen to ignore posts from hill55. Show hill55's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    As a result of this thread and conversations I had at a party last Saturday night, I am now reading Team of Rivals.

     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from antibody. Show antibody's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    In response to royf19's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to billge's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    Yeah Roy if  wasn't in school, or playing ball, I was reading and going to the library. Simpler times, less tv and no computers.  and djc Vermont eh, where about in  Vermont  and now?  Used to wofk some Vermont towns, wnen I lived in NH, now in NC Used to know a Dave Buffum from Nebraska I think at the beach

    [/QUOTE]

    I could never understand reading works of fiction.  I know that it is not real, so I have a problem connecting with it.  So I generally read non-fiction, generally about financial matters.  Last book I read was The Big Short.  That was a couple of years ago, but I read it five times.  It's amazing how nothing ever changes.

    [/QUOTE]

    I read more fiction when I was younger, mysteries like Agatha Christie novels and some others. I've read a bunch of Michner novels because I liked the way he blends fictional characters in real historical situations where the history is real.

    But I love history, so now I tend to read mostly history. There are some fiction that might seem interesting -- Dan Brown, Grisham, Clancey -- and every now and then I'll get one but it takes a lot for one of them to get on my current reading list.

    [/QUOTE]


    Have you ever heard of William Martin? Writes historical fiction based on actual events with some fictional element thrown in, most of them set in New England. Back Bay is about a missing Paul Revere tea set stolen from the White House in the War of 1812. Cape Cod is about the missing log of The Mayflower's captain. I highly reccomend all of his books.

     
  11. You have chosen to ignore posts from billge. Show billge's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    Dont know Martin, will have to check him out

     
  12. You have chosen to ignore posts from antibody. Show antibody's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    In response to tvfrank's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to NLU75's comment:

     

    In response to youkillus's comment:

     

     

     

    In response to antibody's comment:

     

    Currently reading two. Team of Rivals (The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln) byDoris Kearns Goodwin and Stormy Weather by Carl Hiaasen. I've read one book by James Lee Burke, a Robichaux novel, and would like to read more.

     

     



    Burke is great, the telling of long time social injustice in La is in stark contrast to the dream world of Duck Dynasty.

     

     

     

    The  Last Gunfight Jeff Guinn about the gunfight at the OK Corral & to ride shoot straight & speak the truth by Jeff Cooper


     

     



    I agree that James Lee Burke is great. I'll go one step further and state that he is the best American novelist working today. Btw, Clete Purcell is one of the most complex characters ever to appear in a work of fiction.

     

    Other excellent crime novelists i would reccommend  are:

    George Pelecanos

    Robert Crais

    Lee Child

    Joe Finder

    Michael Connelly

    Andrew Vachhs

    Don Winslow

    Lawrence Bloch

    James Ellroy

    Joe R. Lansdale

     

    At this time i'm reading DOCTOR SLEEP by Stephen King. A sequel to THE SHINING.

    [/QUOTE]


    Would add to the list of crime authors John D. MacDonald and his Travis McGee series.

     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from antibody. Show antibody's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    In response to hill55's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    As a result of this thread and conversations I had at a party last Saturday night, I am now reading Team of Rivals.

    [/QUOTE]


    Cool

     
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  15. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    Orange is the New Black. Yes, I'm late to the party. Just curious as to what it would be like to be in prison. Interesting though, it seems like it's not a prison prison since everyone seems free to roam outside. I didn't know that.

    Also, of course, my usual Everest conquest books I always read in the winter. I'm completely obsessed with the guys that climb that mountain. They're like rock stars to me. I've even thought about what it would be like to go to base camp just to meet them. lol  They have to be some of the most fascinating people to talk to. I mean, who would do that? It's just amazing to me.

    And I'm obsessed with Nepal and the sherpas as well. I even have things I've bought that were handmade in Nepal that I love. The people there and their stories are so interesting. I just love everything about them and that mountain. I don't know why.

     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from youkillus. Show youkillus's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    In response to tvfrank's comment:

    In response to NLU75's comment:

    In response to antibody's comment:

     I agree that James Lee Burke is great. I'll go one step further and state that he is the best American novelist working today. Btw, Clete Purcell is one of the most complex characters ever to appear in a work of fiction.

     

    At this time i'm reading DOCTOR SLEEP by Stephen King. A sequel to THE SHINING.



    Naturally Hollwood ruins Purcell for the movie, "In the Electric Mist" starring Tommy Lee Jones as Dave Robicheaux. They change his name, and have him commit suicide, which makes Robicheaux use the throw down piece to create "evidence", both acts were out of character.

     
  17. You have chosen to ignore posts from youkillus. Show youkillus's posts

    Re: What are you reading?


    Christmas stocking delivered "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas", and "A Cruel and Shocking Act" about the investigation of the JFK assassination. 

     

     
  18. You have chosen to ignore posts from Joebreidey. Show Joebreidey's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    And I'm obsessed with Nepal and the sherpas as well. I even have things I've bought that were handmade in Nepal that I love. The people there and their stories are so interesting. I just love everything about them and that mountain. I don't know why.

    Do you ever do any climbing?  I climbed the mountain next to Lake Mohonk, which is not much more than a vertical hike (1500-1660 ft), it made me feel remarkable calm.

     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from kimsaysthis. Show kimsaysthis's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    In response to Joebreidey's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    And I'm obsessed with Nepal and the sherpas as well. I even have things I've bought that were handmade in Nepal that I love. The people there and their stories are so interesting. I just love everything about them and that mountain. I don't know why.

    Do you ever do any climbing?  I climbed the mountain next to Lake Mohonk, which is not much more than a vertical hike (1500-1660 ft), it made me feel remarkable calm.

    [/QUOTE]

    That's amazing to me. You should feel proud. I mean that. I think I'm a little in love with you now. :)  It's interesting that you say you felt calm. So many climbers say that, even on K2. It really must be as amazing as I imagine it would be. Otherworldly.

     I personally don't climb. Just the idea of it is so foreign to me. I would probably be considered a nuisance on any mountain. If I showed up, they would probably say, "Oh, great, here we go. Another idiot who read too many books about mountain climbing." lol

    Having said that, it has absolutely fascinated me for years now. I love reading about their climbs and what happened. How they dealt with any situation and still kept going.  I probably know everything there is to know about how to climb, and what to do, but would never actually have the courage to do it. And I don't have to get there to find that out. That's probably part of the appeal to me. It's something I could never do, and people devote their whole lives to it. It does make for interesting reading for sure.

     
  20. You have chosen to ignore posts from royf19. Show royf19's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    In response to tvfrank's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    In response to Hfxsoxnut's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    I read the Montville bio of Ted Williams.  I seem to be in the minority on this, but I found the story of Ted Williams to be a little sad and depressing.  In spite of all his on-the-field success, Williams did not seem to me to be a happy person.  There was a lot of frustration in his baseball career, with the heartbreaking losses in 1946, 1948 and 1949 and his own failures in his one WS appearance.  And the beating he took from the Boston press was just horrific.  We might think there is negativity in the Boston sports press now, but it's got nothing on what Williams went through. 

    Williams' personal life also struck me as a bit sad.  At the end of the day I got the feeling that his happiest times were when he was retired and 'gone fishing' to his heart's content.

    [/QUOTE]

    I can recommend two excellent books relating to Ted:

    Summer of '49

    The Teammates.

    Both were written by the late, great David Halberstam.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Both great books. Read them both. Love David Halberstam. Also read and recommend:

    "The Powers that Be"

    "The Fifties"

    "The Best and the Brightest"

    "The Reckoning"

    "The Education of a Coach"

    It's too bad he never completed the book he was working on about the 1958 NFL championship. With his style, it would have been a great read.

    Once I whittle down the number of books on my bookshelf that I haven't read yet, I'll probablypick up some of the other books he's written.

     
  21. You have chosen to ignore posts from Ice-Cream. Show Ice-Cream's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    Good morning everyone   Laughing

    Below is an interesting article to read with a few fun facts about the Red Sox (which I copy-pasted below)    Cool

    http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/10210242/mlb-strange-true-2013

    • As recently as 2012, they won the same number of games as the Marlins (69). And had a worse run differential (minus-72) than the Mets (minus-59). And had a worse record in their hallowed home park (34-47) than the Astros (35-46). Pretty zany formula for winning the next World Series, don't you think?

    • But in 2013, those same Red Sox turned themselves into the first team in the major leagues to win 90 games -- a year after they neglected to win 90 ALL SEASON. Hey, of course they did.

    • Their unhittable closer, Koji Uehara, was a guy who started out the year pitching the SIXTH inning.

    • Their World Series MVP, David Ortiz, was a guy who went 2-for-22 in the ALCS.

    • Their fearsome lineup batted a combined .169 in the World Series – if you didn't count Ortiz, that is. (He hit .688.)

    • The 7-8-9 spots in that fearsome lineup went 0-for-44 at one point in that World Series. Yep, 0-for-44.

    • Over the first three games of the ALCS against Detroit, that same fearsome lineup got no hits through five innings in Game 1, no hits through five in Game 2 and then one hit through five in Game 3 – which added up to the picturesque total of 1-for-46. Yeah, 1-for-46. And they somehow won two of those three games.

     

     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from EnchiladaT. Show EnchiladaT's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    Ho Chi Minh, A Life by William J. Duiker

     
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  24. You have chosen to ignore posts from michaelsjr. Show michaelsjr's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    The bulk of my reading other than professional literature is Civil War History, but got these goodies for Christmas..

    The Brothers by Stephen Kinzer

    The Kid (Ted Williams) by Ben Bradlee, Jr

    Tenth of December by George Saunders

    Thank You For Your Service by David Finkel

    Sycamore Row (Grisham)

    Dr Sleep (Stephen King)

    FYI - My Life (B Clinton) is good book as is HRC's autobio as is GWB's memoirs and surprisingly so is the autobio by Keith Richards and the bio of Mick Jagger

    The "Killing.." books (Lincoln, Kennedy, Jesus) by O'Reilly are all quite good as well.

    Someone said their take on Ted Williams bio was one of a sad or unhappy man...Have read several TW bios and about to read another and I agree...same for Cobb, Ruth, DiMaggio and especially Thorpe.

    Happy New Year, everyone.

     

     
  25. You have chosen to ignore posts from soxnewmex. Show soxnewmex's posts

    Re: What are you reading?

    In response to michaelsjr's comment:
    [QUOTE]

    The bulk of my reading other than professional literature is Civil War History, but got these goodies for Christmas..

    The Brothers by Stephen Kinzer

    The Kid (Ted Williams) by Ben Bradlee, Jr

    Tenth of December by George Saunders

    Thank You For Your Service by David Finkel

    Sycamore Row (Grisham)

    Dr Sleep (Stephen King)

    FYI - My Life (B Clinton) is good book as is HRC's autobio as is GWB's memoirs and surprisingly so is the autobio by Keith Richards and the bio of Mick Jagger

    The "Killing.." books (Lincoln, Kennedy, Jesus) by O'Reilly are all quite good as well.

    Someone said their take on Ted Williams bio was one of a sad or unhappy man...Have read several TW bios and about to read another and I agree...same for Cobb, Ruth, DiMaggio and especially Thorpe.

    Happy New Year, everyone.

     

    [/QUOTE]

    Liked that Saunders earlier books more than a little, haven't read the new one Tenth of December yet.

     

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