What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

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    What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    Let the hype begin. The expectations are high thanks to individuals like Peter Gammons. Here is what he said last week on WEEI:"...If this guy is back to where he was five years ago — by far the best college pitcher in the sport — then they really have something. He's either going to be a really good reliever or a fascinating starter."
    What do you expect tomorrow night as he faces the San Diego Padres who as a team have a .231 batting average in the Triple A National League.
     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    Interesting comparison. He is in fact very similar to Johnson, who also suffered from control problems early in his career.
     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    Good afternoon to my good friend Carnie. I can't wait until my Yankees face him. Our lineup is not made of Triple A batters. They are made up of disciplined patient major league hitters who will treat him like a batting practice pitcher. Success at Pawtucket is not a good indicator on how he'll do facing hitters in the AL East.
     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    In Response to What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?:
    [QUOTE]Let the hype begin. The expectations are high thanks to individuals like Peter Gammons. Here is what he said last week on WEEI:"...If this guy is back to where he was five years ago — by far the best college pitcher in the sport — then they really have something. He's either going to be a really good reliever or a fascinating starter." What do you expect tomorrow night as he faces the San Diego Padres who as a team have a .231 batting average in the Triple A National League.
    Posted by FRAFRGL[/QUOTE]

    Just to lend a helping hand would be great.
     
  5. You have chosen to ignore posts from FRAFRGL. Show FRAFRGL's posts

    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    To my good friend craze4sox:Don't expect Randy Johnson to walk on the field.
     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    For starters, he is at least much better looking than Randy. 



    Then again, I think most of us can say this. 
     
  7. You have chosen to ignore posts from carnie. Show carnie's posts

    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    I would think that the likelihood of the Yanks facing Miller would be pretty low unless someone else gets hurt. Clay should be fully recovered by August.
     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    In Response to Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?:
    [QUOTE]To my good friend craze4sox:Don't expect Randy Johnson to walk on the field.
    Posted by FRAFRGL[/QUOTE]

    I'm hoping for soimething in between the Randy that beatt the Yankees in the WS and the one that limped out of NY.
     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    In Response to Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?:
    [QUOTE]Good afternoon to my good friend Carnie. I can't wait until my Yankees face him. Our lineup is not made of Triple A batters. They are made up of disciplined patient major league hitters who will treat him like a batting practice pitcher. Success at Pawtucket is not a good indicator on how he'll do facing hitters in the AL East.
    Posted by FRAFRGL[/QUOTE]

    He's got to start off by going up and in on AL East hitters.  Chin music cannot be underestimated.  Nor can drillinig a few.  Just ask Pedro Martinez. 
     
  10. You have chosen to ignore posts from southpaw777. Show southpaw777's posts

    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    In Response to Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?:
    [QUOTE]Good afternoon to my good friend Carnie. I can't wait until my Yankees face him. Our lineup is not made of Triple A batters. They are made up of disciplined patient major league hitters who will treat him like a batting practice pitcher. Success at Pawtucket is not a good indicator on how he'll do facing hitters in the AL East.
    Posted by FRAFRGL[/QUOTE]

    If Miller has finally figured it out, that statement might be a bit much there Frankie..Tall lanky lefties usuallt take a little more time to get the mechanics right..Theo could have a steal here..We'll have to wait a couple starts to see..
     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    One step at a time before comparing him to RJ.  I'll be happy if he doesn't walk many and gets the team into the 6th. 
     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    5 innings, maybe close to 6, 88 pitches, 3 hits, 1 run, 1 walk, 8 k's......not bad for an AAA guy...
     
  13. You have chosen to ignore posts from REBEL. Show REBEL's posts

    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    In Response to Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?:
    [QUOTE]Good afternoon to my good friend Carnie. I can't wait until my Yankees face him. Our lineup is not made of Triple A batters. They are made up of disciplined patient major league hitters who will treat him like a batting practice pitcher. Success at Pawtucket is not a good indicator on how he'll do facing hitters in the AL East.
    Posted by FRAFRGL[/QUOTE]

    Yes, and I can't wait until the Rumatoid, old hasbeen Yankees face him either... they will stick their heads over the plate in hopes of being hit, then blame it on us!!
    The only good Yankee is a dead Yankee/Yankee fan!!
     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

        Miller has always had the kind of stuff of which number one starters are made but he has also had problems putting his pitches where he wanted them.He clearly was rushed to the majors and,as often the case with those whose physical skills are of a dominating nature but aren't given the time to harness and hone their physical gifts,developed and displayed more than the odd technical flaws until a few weeks ago.Has he finally learned and incorporated the necessary fundamentals to use his skills to there maximum capacity?If he has,the Red Sox have struck gold,hit the lottery and inherited millions from an unknown second cousin.Way too soon to tell,but if has he's going to great to watch for a lot of years. 
     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    never mind miller frank. worry about the cubbies tonight.
     
  16. You have chosen to ignore posts from promise4you. Show promise4you's posts

    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    In Response to What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?:
    [QUOTE]Let the hype begin. The expectations are high thanks to individuals like Peter Gammons. Here is what he said last week on WEEI:"...If this guy is back to where he was five years ago — by far the best college pitcher in the sport — then they really have something. He's either going to be a really good reliever or a fascinating starter." What do you expect tomorrow night as he faces the San Diego Padres who as a team have a .231 batting average in the Triple A National League.
    Posted by FRAFRGL[/QUOTE]

    I Hope that he excels, and I hope he does not read this stuff. He needs no pressure put upon him. Everyone knows he has fabulous stuff. I hope the Sox baby him, bring him along slow, give hive support, tell him how much they believe in him. Same as they did Mr Lester. I have pondered what it would be like to have two dominating lefties, we are so close. Maybe some can remember two dominating lefties on the same team, my memory betrays me in thinking of a staff that had two. Im thinking that with Dobrount coming soon, we may have no room left at the top as he has displayed great stuff as well. It is so nice to live in Theo era, talent beholds us because of him!
     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    Based upon his history I hope he makes it to the 5th without walking more than 3.His history says this could be another pitching performance similar to Dice a lot of walks. Difference is Dice nibbled and Miller will be at least trying to throw it over the plate.

    Twice he went from the minors to the majors and failed I hope the third time is a charm
     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    In Response to Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?:
    [QUOTE]Interesting comparison. He is in fact very similar to Johnson, who also suffered from control problems early in his career.
    Posted by carnie[/QUOTE]

    Carnie, a few weeks ago i checked his stats compared to the GREAT Randy Johnson. Mr Millers control problems were much worse the Johnson's. However there is a parallelism to the two. I think we have a winner in this kid. He was smart to stay with the Sox who believed in him and were totally honest with him on this road to the majors. I hope for him and the Sox it pays big time. This kid has class, he stuck with a program that only promised to help him get things back together again. Both sides will benefit from this. Long live faith in our systems ability to produce winners.
     
  19. You have chosen to ignore posts from fir.eballer58. Show fir.eballer58's posts

    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    Andrew Miller and Sandy Koufax? Koufax had control problems early in career.
    From Wikipedia:
    Early years (1955–60)

    Because Koufax's signing bonus was greater than $4,000 ($33,000 in current dollar terms), he was known as a bonus baby. This forced the Dodgers to keep him on the major league roster for at least two years before he could be sent to the minors. To make room for him, the Dodgers optioned their future manager, Tommy Lasorda, to the Montreal Royals of the International League. Lasorda would later joke that it took Koufax to keep him off the Dodger pitching staff.[19]

    Koufax made his major league debut on June 24 1955 against the Milwaukee Braves, with the Dodgers trailing 7–1 in the fifth inning. Johnny Logan, the first batter Koufax faced, hit a bloop single. Eddie Mathews bunted, and Koufax threw the ball into center field. Koufax walked Hank Aaron on four pitches to load the bases, then struck out Bobby Thomson on a full count.[20]

    Koufax's first start was on July 6. He lasted only 4 ⅔ innings, giving up eight walks.[21] He did not start again for almost two months, but on August 27, Koufax threw a two-hit, 7–0 complete game shutout against the Cincinnati Reds for his first major league win.[22] Koufax made only 12 appearances in 1955, pitching 41.7 innings and walking almost as many men (28) as he struck out (30). His only other win in 1955 was also a shutout.[23]

    During the fall, he enrolled in the Columbia University School of General Studies, which offered night classes in architecture. The Dodgers won the 1955 World Series for the first title in franchise history, but Koufax did not appear in the series. After the final out of Game Seven, Koufax drove to Columbia to attend class.[24]

    1956 wasn't very different from 1955 for Koufax. Despite the blazing speed of his fastball, Koufax continued to struggle with control problems. He saw little work, pitching only 58.7 innings with a 4.91 ERA, walking 29 and striking out 30. He was rarely allowed to work out of a jam. As soon as Koufax threw a couple of balls in a row, Alston would signal for a replacement to start warming up in the bullpen. Jackie Robinson, in his final season, clashed with Alston on several different subjects, including Koufax. Robinson saw that Koufax was talented and had flashes of brilliance, and objected to Koufax being benched for weeks at a time.[25]

    To prepare for the 1957 season, the Dodgers sent Koufax to Puerto Rico to play winter ball. On May 15, the restriction on sending Koufax down to the minors was lifted. Alston gave him a chance to justify his place on the major league roster by giving him the next day's start. Facing the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field, Koufax struck out 13 while pitching his first complete game in almost two years. For the first time in his career, he was in the starting rotation, but only for two weeks. Despite winning three of his next five with a 2.90 ERA, Koufax didn't get another start for 45 days. In that start, he struck out 11 in seven innings, but got a no-decision. On September 29, Koufax became the last man ever to pitch for the Brooklyn Dodgers before their move to Los Angeles, by throwing an inning of relief in the final game of the season.[26]

    Over the next three seasons, Koufax was in and out of the Dodger starting rotation due to injuries. In 1958, he began 7–3, but sprained his ankle in a collision at first base, finishing the season at 11–11 and leading the NL in wild pitches. In June 1959, Koufax set the record for a night game with 16 strikeouts. On August 31, 1959, he surpassed his career high with 18 strikeouts, setting the NL record and tying Bob Feller's major league record for strikeouts in one game.[27]

    In 1959, the Dodgers won a close pennant race against the Braves and the Giants, then beat the Chicago White Sox in the World Series. Koufax pitched two perfect relief innings in the Series opener, though they came after the Dodgers were already behind 11–0. Alston gave him the start in the fifth game, at the Los Angeles Coliseum in front of 92,706 fans. Koufax allowed only one run in seven innings, but lost the 1–0 game when Nellie Fox scored on a double play. Returning to Chicago, the Dodgers won the sixth game and the Series.[28]

    In early 1960, Koufax asked Dodgers GM Buzzie Bavasi to trade him because he wasn't getting enough playing time. By the end of 1960, after going 8–13, Koufax was thinking about quitting baseball to devote himself to an electronics business that he'd invested in. After the last game of the season, he threw his gloves and spikes into the trash. Nobe Kawano, the clubhouse supervisor, retrieved the equipment to return to Koufax the following year (or to somebody else if Koufax did not return to play).[29]

     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    In Response to Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?:
    [QUOTE]Andrew Miller and Sandy Koufax? Koufax had control problems early in career. From Wikipedia: Early years (1955–60) Because Koufax's signing bonus was greater than $ 4,000 ($33,000 in current dollar terms), he was known as a bonus baby . This forced the Dodgers to keep him on the major league roster for at least two years before he could be sent to the minors . To make room for him, the Dodgers optioned their future manager, Tommy Lasorda , to the Montreal Royals of the International League . Lasorda would later joke that it took Koufax to keep him off the Dodger pitching staff. [ 19 ] Koufax made his major league debut on June 24 1955 against the Milwaukee Braves , with the Dodgers trailing 7–1 in the fifth inning. Johnny Logan , the first batter Koufax faced, hit a bloop single. Eddie Mathews bunted, and Koufax threw the ball into center field. Koufax walked Hank Aaron on four pitches to load the bases, then struck out Bobby Thomson on a full count . [ 20 ] Koufax's first start was on July 6. He lasted only 4 ⅔ innings, giving up eight walks. [ 21 ] He did not start again for almost two months, but on August 27, Koufax threw a two-hit, 7–0 complete game shutout against the Cincinnati Reds for his first major league win. [ 22 ] Koufax made only 12 appearances in 1955, pitching 41.7 innings and walking almost as many men (28) as he struck out (30). His only other win in 1955 was also a shutout. [ 23 ] During the fall, he enrolled in the Columbia University School of General Studies , which offered night classes in architecture. The Dodgers won the 1955 World Series for the first title in franchise history, but Koufax did not appear in the series. After the final out of Game Seven, Koufax drove to Columbia to attend class. [ 24 ] 1956 wasn't very different from 1955 for Koufax. Despite the blazing speed of his fastball, Koufax continued to struggle with control problems. He saw little work, pitching only 58.7 innings with a 4.91 ERA, walking 29 and striking out 30. He was rarely allowed to work out of a jam. As soon as Koufax threw a couple of balls in a row, Alston would signal for a replacement to start warming up in the bullpen. Jackie Robinson , in his final season, clashed with Alston on several different subjects, including Koufax. Robinson saw that Koufax was talented and had flashes of brilliance, and objected to Koufax being benched for weeks at a time. [ 25 ] To prepare for the 1957 season, the Dodgers sent Koufax to Puerto Rico to play winter ball. On May 15, the restriction on sending Koufax down to the minors was lifted. Alston gave him a chance to justify his place on the major league roster by giving him the next day's start. Facing the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field , Koufax struck out 13 while pitching his first complete game in almost two years. For the first time in his career, he was in the starting rotation, but only for two weeks. Despite winning three of his next five with a 2.90 ERA, Koufax didn't get another start for 45 days. In that start, he struck out 11 in seven innings, but got a no-decision. On September 29, Koufax became the last man ever to pitch for the Brooklyn Dodgers before their move to Los Angeles , by throwing an inning of relief in the final game of the season. [ 26 ] Over the next three seasons, Koufax was in and out of the Dodger starting rotation due to injuries. In 1958, he began 7–3, but sprained his ankle in a collision at first base, finishing the season at 11–11 and leading the NL in wild pitches. In June 1959, Koufax set the record for a night game with 16 strikeouts. On August 31, 1959, he surpassed his career high with 18 strikeouts, setting the NL record and tying Bob Feller 's major league record for strikeouts in one game. [ 27 ] In 1959 , the Dodgers won a close pennant race against the Braves and the Giants , then beat the Chicago White Sox in the World Series . Koufax pitched two perfect relief innings in the Series opener, though they came after the Dodgers were already behind 11–0. Alston gave him the start in the fifth game, at the Los Angeles Coliseum in front of 92,706 fans. Koufax allowed only one run in seven innings, but lost the 1–0 game when Nellie Fox scored on a double play. Returning to Chicago, the Dodgers won the sixth game and the Series. [ 28 ] In early 1960 , Koufax asked Dodgers GM Buzzie Bavasi to trade him because he wasn't getting enough playing time. By the end of 1960 , after going 8–13, Koufax was thinking about quitting baseball to devote himself to an electronics business that he'd invested in. After the last game of the season, he threw his gloves and spikes into the trash. Nobe Kawano, the clubhouse supervisor, retrieved the equipment to return to Koufax the following year (or to somebody else if Koufax did not return to play). [ 29 ]
    Posted by fir.eballer58[/QUOTE]

    Well, Rick Ankiel also struggled with his control.  That doesn't mean that Andrew Miller will become a slugging outfielder. 
     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    Fireballer, Thanks for that wonderful piece! I was aware of Koufax's control issues, but i did not realize they were that bad. After all I was born in 55 and only remember reading about his greatness.
     
  22. You have chosen to ignore posts from Your-Echo. Show Your-Echo's posts

    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    Another thread about hype that isn't validated. If you read the quote by Gammons he was speaking of the Andrew Miller just out of college five years ago. He made no comparison to Randy Johnson. This thread sounds like Softlaw started it since he is sees hype behind every tree and under every stone.
     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    I'll be real happy with a QS.
     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    I always expect greatness.
     
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    Re: What are your expectations for Andrew Miller. The Second Coming of Randy Johnson?

    geez...the kid's tall and a lefty, so compare him to Randy Johnson...that's pretty unfair...what if he pitches more like Walter Johnson...is that ok?....
     
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